Calendar of Events

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

Details

March

MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 1 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Early American History Seminar Negro Cloth: Mastering the Market for Slave Clothing in Antebellum America 4 March 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Seth Rockman, Brown University Comment: David Quigley, Boston College Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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Brown Bag The Appomattox Effect: Searching for the End of War in the American Civil War and Beyond 5 March 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Michael Vorenberg, Brown University Americans tend to mark the surrender at Appomattox as the end of the Civil War, but the last battle ...

Americans tend to mark the surrender at Appomattox as the end of the Civil War, but the last battle came more than a month later, the last surrender a month after that, and the official “cessation of hostilities” more than a year later. A similar Appomattox effect shapes the way Americans think of other wars, making people assume, even when well-known facts indicate otherwise, that wars have discrete, identifiable endpoints. This lunch discussion raises some of the issues associated with identifying the end of any U.S. war in light of the search for an end of the Civil War.

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Public Program, Special Event A Traveled First Lady: An Evening with Louisa Catherine Adams 6 March 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm C. James Taylor and Margaret Hogan In A Traveled First Lady: Writings of Louisa Catherine Adams, editors Margaret Hogan and C. ...

In A Traveled First Lady: Writings of Louisa Catherine Adams, editors Margaret Hogan and C. James Taylor selected excerpts from diaries and memoirs of Adams’s most revealing comments on life at European courts, the difficulty of being an outsider, Abigail Adams’s Quincy, and the importance of society and etiquette in early Washington D.C. She is best remembered as one the capital’s most accomplished hostesses as hundreds of guests regularly attended her Tuesday evenings of conversation, music, dancing, and refreshments. Join the editors for a social evening with Louisa. There will be conversation and refreshments—but no dancing!

Margaret A. Hogan is an independent editorial consultant and the former Managing Editor of the Adams Papers at the Massachusetts Historical Society. C. James Taylor is Editor in Chief of the Adams Papers.

To Reserve: There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 8 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Environmental History Seminar The Galveston Spirit: How a Hurricane Remade American Politics 11 March 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Summer A. Shafer, Harvard University Comment: Anthony N. Penna, Northeastern University Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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Public Program Created Equal: The Abolitionists 12 March 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Film Screening & Discussion Facilitated by Joanne Pope Melish, University of Kentucky The Abolitionists brings to life the struggles of the men and women who led the battle to ...

The Abolitionists brings to life the struggles of the men and women who led the battle to end slavery.Using this film to ground our discussion, we will explore the lives of the individuals who participated in the antislavery movement: newspaper editor William Lloyd Garrison; former slave, author, and activist Frederick Douglass; Angelina Grimké, daughter of a rich South Carolina slaveholder; Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin; and John Brown, ultimately executed for his armed seizure of the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. Clips from the film will be shown at the event, and the film can be viewed in its entirety at: createdequal.neh.gov.

Joanne Pope Melish is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky and a visiting scholar in American Studies at Brown University. She is the author of Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and “Race” in New England, 1780-1860.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 15 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Public Program, Author Talk The Lodge Women, Their Men and Their Times 17 March 2014.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Emily Lodge Like a Whitman poem, the saga of the Lodge family has unfolded in tandem with the history of the ...

Like a Whitman poem, the saga of the Lodge family has unfolded in tandem with the history of the great American experiment itself. Yet while the biographies of the Lodge patriarchs have been well-documented, the stories of the influential Lodge women have never been authoritatively chronicled. From the earliest days of the American colonies, through the Gilded Age, and into the first years of the 21st century, The Lodge Women Their Men, and Their Times traces her family’s remarkable history through its female figures, constructing a narrative that is at once intensely personal, political, and wholly universal.

Based on archival research, interviews, and personal memoirs, Emily Lodge presents her ancestors' stories largely through their own voices, heard in a rich collection of personal letters exchanged with the luminaries of their times, whose lives were linked with the Lodges by politics, art, and family: Henry Adams, Henry James, Theodore Roosevelt, John Hay, Elizabeth Cameron and Edith Wharton, some of whose letters are published here for the first time.From her unique descendant’s view on a long line of prominent Lodge women, the author recalls their grace, dash, and political influence through a sweep of history that illuminates the pages with the incandescent human truths of a distinguished family's life and times.

Over the last thirty years a fascination with public policy has taken Emily into government, journalism, business and academia. As a print journalist, she focused on law and the courts. As a speech-writer for a US Congressman and a US Ambassador to France, her domain was foreign policy. As an award-winning television documentary researcher for 60 Minutes, she helped prove someone innocent. Emily won an Emmy Award for a CBS News Special Report about education. On moving to Europe, she became a correspondent for Brussel’s leading monthly business magazine. Her ParisVoice features column were known for their witty and perceptive observations about public figures. She has written brochures for companies and helped create a major fund-raising drive for INSEAD, Europe’s premier business school. A graduate of Georgetown University in diplomatic history, she is currently writing news analysis from the Middle East.

To Reserve: This event is free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag "Dam all pumpkin states": King Williams War in the North and Colonial Legitimacy 19 March 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Katie Moore, Boston University In the spring of 1689, the Dominion of New England collapsed when provisional authorities in Boston ...

In the spring of 1689, the Dominion of New England collapsed when provisional authorities in Boston and New York seized power. The governor-general was placed under house arrest and the northern garrisons ordered abandoned, exposing the English frontier to ongoing attacks by French and Abenaki soldiers. The following year, ad hoc colonial governments coordinated and launched attacks on Quebec and Montreal. How did Puritan divines and a German militia captain use war with the French to legitimate their authority to colonists, colonial leaders, and Native American allies? How did they justify strategy, finance, and diplomacy? Join us to learn more about this fascinating project. - This event has been rescheduled from February 5, when it was postponed due to snow..

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Special Event An Evening at the Bostonian Society 19 March 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM This event is open only to members of the Jeremy Belknap Circle. Members of the Jeremy Belknap Circle are invited to an evening at the Bostonian Society located at ...

State Street, 1801Members of the Jeremy Belknap Circle are invited to an evening at the Bostonian Society located at 206 Washington Street in Boston. Brian LeMay and Nat Sheidley will discuss ongoing plans and lead a tour of the building, including the tower (and its resident ghost). A reception will follow.

To register, please call 617-646-0543 or e-mail awolfe@masshist.org.

Join an MHS Fund Giving Circle today!

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Biography Seminar The Days of Their Lives: Using Diaries, Journals, and an "Almanack" to Recover the Past 20 March 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, Harvard University; Louisa Thomas, independent scholar and the author of Conscience; Noelle Baker, The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau Moderator: Susan Ware, General Editor, American National Biography This program will feature a conversation with Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, 300th Anniversary University ...

This program will feature a conversation with Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, 300th Anniversary University Professor at Harvard, who is using diaries (men's and women's) in her broader study of Mormon history; Louisa Thomas, an independent scholar and the author of "Conscience" (about her grandfather Norman Thomas), who is writing a biography of Louisa Catherine Adams; and Noelle Baker, Editorial Consultant to The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau, who is preparing a digital edition of Mary Moody Emerson's diary.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 22 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Boston’s Chinatowns and Recent Senior Migration 25 March 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Nicole Newendorp, Harvard University Comment: Wing-kai To, Bridgewater State University Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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Library Closed Library Closed 27 March 2014.Thursday, all day Due to maintenance work in the building the MHS library will be closed to researchers on Thursday, ...

Due to maintenance work in the building the MHS library will be closed to researchers on Thursday, 27 March 2014.  Contact the library staff at 617-646-0532 or library@masshist.org with any questions. 

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Member Event, Special Event New Faces & New Acquisitions 27 March 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   This event is open only to new MHS Fellows and Members. Following a reception, new Fellows and Members are invited to join us for a unique opportunity to ...

Following a reception, new Fellows and Members are invited to join us for a unique opportunity to learn more about and view a selection of the Society's most recent acquisitions, including letters from a stunning collection of Adams and Cranch family correspondence and items from the Civil War archives of Capt. Luis F. Emilio of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment. Enjoy the chance to view Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial. Please call 617-646-0560 or register online by clicking the ticket icon above.

Become a Member today!

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Special Event, Public Program Tell it with Pride 29 March 2014.Saturday, 12:00PM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A Kathryn Greenthal and Henry Duffy Visitors are invited to enjoy an afternoon program of exhibition tours and special talks at the MHS ...

Visitors are invited to enjoy an afternoon program of exhibition tours and special talks at the MHS related to the Tell It With Pride exhibition.

12:00: Join us for a presentation from the men of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A, a company of civilian re-enactment personnel who keep alive the legacy of the unit through living history displays, educational briefings to the general public, and Civil War period encampments and re-enactments.

1:00 Time to view the exhibition and for informal conversation with the men of the 54th Regiment.

2:00: Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial: Its Context and Its Creation, a lecture by Kathryn Greenthal, author of Augustus Saint-Gaudens: Master Sculptor.

3:00 Consecration and Monument: Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts 54th Regiment, a lecture by Henry Duffy, Curator of Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish, NH.

This program is presented in partnership with the Friends of the Public Garden.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560. Please register if you plan to attend ANY part of this program (even if you can not join us for the entire afternoon).

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April
Public Program, Author Talk American Jews & America’s Game 1 April 2014.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Larry Ruttman Larry Ruttman will discuss the four main subjects of his book: baseball; American Jewish life in the ...

Larry Ruttman will discuss the four main subjects of his book: baseball; American Jewish life in the United States over the last century; American history; and the revealing personal lives of people involved with the game. Compiled using oral histories gathered from nearly 50 Jewish baseball luminaries (who served the game both on and off the field), Ruttman's book offers an anecdotal study of American Jews and the fellow citizens with whom they interacted during momentous times for America, set against the backdrop of a quintessentially American game that fascinates us all.

Larry Ruttman, Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, is the author of Voices of Brookline, a national finalist for the Award of Merit of the American Association of State and Local History. He has practiced law in Boston for more than fifty years and produces and hosts a television interview show in his hometown of Brookline, Massachusetts.

To Reserve: This event is free and open to the public.

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Early American History Seminar From "Disturbers" to Protectors of the Peace: Baptist Church Discipline and Legalities on the Trans-Appalachian Frontier 1 April 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Jeff Perry, Purdue University Comment: Stephen A. Marini, Wellesley College Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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Brown Bag Liberal Religion and Slavery in America, 1775-1865 2 April 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Christopher Cameron, University of North Carolina at Charlotte This talk will explore the disparate ways that liberal ministers engaged with the institution of ...

This talk will explore the disparate ways that liberal ministers engaged with the institution of slavery, whether as proslavery thinkers, colonizationists, or radical abolitionists. It will examine the theological underpinnings of liberals' views on slavery, as well as the differences between Unitarian, Universalist, and Transcendentalists' engagement with the institution.

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Public Program Created Equal: Slavery by Another Name & The Freedom Riders 2 April 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Film Screening & Discussion Facilitated by Joanne Pope Melish, University of Kentucky Based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning book by Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another ...

Based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning book by Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes and often guilty of nothing, who were bought, sold, abused, and subjected to deadly working conditions. Raymond Arsenault’s 2007 book Freedom Riders served as the basis for the film of the same name, which tells the terrifying, moving, and suspenseful story of a time when white and black volunteers riding a bus into the Deep South risked being jailed, beaten, or killed, as white local and state authorities ignored or encouraged violent attacks. Clips from the two films will be shown, and they can be viewed online in their entirety at: createdequal.neh.gov.

Joanne Pope Melish is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky and a visiting scholar in American Studies at Brown University. She is the author of Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and “Race” in New England, 1780-1860.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar "Talents Committed to Your Care": Reading and Writing Antislavery 3 April 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:00PM RSVP required Mary Kelley, University of Michigan Comment: Elizabeth Maddock Dillon, Northeastern University Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 5 April 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Environmental History Seminar A Mountain in Winter: Wilderness Politics, Economic Development, and the Transformation of Whiteface Mountain into a Modern Ski Center, 1932-1980 8 April 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Jonathan D. Anzalone, Stony Brook University Comment: Jim O’Connell, National Park Service Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 12 April 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar "How can the wife submit?" African Families Negotiate Gender and Slavery in New England 15 April 2014.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 7:00PM RSVP required Location: Schlesinger Library Gloria Whiting, Harvard University Comment: Barbara Krauthamer, University of Massachusetts—Amherst Rescheduled from February 13, 2014. This paper discusses various ways in which the everyday ...

Rescheduled from February 13, 2014.

This paper discusses various ways in which the everyday realities of slavery shaped gender relations in Afro-New England families. While the structure of slave families in the region was unusually matrifocal, these families nonetheless exhibited a number of patriarchal tendencies. Enslaved African families in New England therefore complicate the assumption of much scholarship that the structure of slave families defined their normative values.

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Public Program, Exhibition The Battles of the 54th: Northern Racism and the Unequal Pay Crisis 18 April 2014.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Gallery Talk Samantha Anderson Grangaard, Northeastern University When Massachusetts Governor John A. Andrew proposed to raise the first military unit consisting of ...

When Massachusetts Governor John A. Andrew proposed to raise the first military unit consisting of black soldiers during the Civil War, he was assured by Secretary of War Edwin Stanton that the men would be paid, clothed, and treated in the same way as white troops. As the recruiting posters and newspaper advertisements stated, this included a state bounty and a monthly pay of $13. In July of 1863, an order was issued in Washington fixing the compensation of black soldiers at the laborers' rate of $10 per month. This amount was offered on several occasions to the men of the 54th, but was continually refused. Governor Andrew and the Massachusetts legislature, feeling responsible for the $3 discrepancy in pay promised to the troops, passed an act in November of 1863 providing the difference from state funds. The men refused to accept this resolution, however, demanding that they receive full soldier pay from the federal government.

Learn more about this pay controvery, and how it was resolved, through items on display in our current exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial.

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Building Closed Patriot's Day 21 April 2014.Monday, all day The MHS is closed for Patriot's Day.

The MHS is closed for Patriot's Day.

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Teacher Workshopbegins Canceled: Tell it With Pride: A Workshop for Educators 22 April 2014.Tuesday, 9:00AM - 3:00PM This event has been canceled. Please contact the education department for more information: ...

This event has been canceled. Please contact the education department for more information: education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

Join us as we explore the role of African Americans in Massachusetts in the era of the Civil War!

Day one (April 22) will take place at the Massachusetts Historical Society, where participants can view original documents and artifacts that shed light on the antislavery movement, the work of the 54th Regiment and its supporters, and the creation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ memorial on Beacon Street.

Day two (April 23) will take place on Beacon Hill. In the morning, we will take a walking tour through the neighborhood with a ranger from Boston African American National Historic Site. After a lunch on your own at Faneuil Hall, we will regroup for a program at the Museum of African American History, which includes a tour of the recently restored African Meeting House.

This workshop is open to all K-12 teachers and library media specialists. The $55 registration fee covers lunch on April 22, materials, and admission to the Museum of African American History. Teachers can earn 10 Professional Development Points for their participation.

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Teacher Workshopends Canceled: Tell it With Pride: A Workshop for Educators 23 April 2014.Wednesday, 9:00AM - 3:00PM This event has been canceled. Please contact the education department for more information: ...

This event has been canceled. Please contact the education department for more information: education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

Join us as we explore the role of African Americans in Massachusetts in the era of the Civil War!

Day one (April 22) will take place at the Massachusetts Historical Society, where participants can view original documents and artifacts that shed light on the antislavery movement, the work of the 54th Regiment and its supporters, and the creation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ memorial on Beacon Street.

Day two (April 23) will take place on Beacon Hill. In the morning, we will take a walking tour through the neighborhood with a ranger from Boston African American National Historic Site. After a lunch on your own at Faneuil Hall, we will regroup for a program at the Museum of African American History, which includes a tour of the recently restored African Meeting House.

This workshop is open to all K-12 teachers and library media specialists. The $55 registration fee covers lunch on April 22, materials, and admission to the Museum of African American History. Teachers can earn 10 Professional Development Points for their participation.

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Brown Bag "Pious Females" and "Good Schools": Transnational Networks of Education in Nineteenth-Century Liberia 23 April 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Marie Stango, University of Michigan This project examines the networks of men and women who helped support education efforts in the ...

This project examines the networks of men and women who helped support education efforts in the American settlements in Liberia, West Africa. These philanthropists, many of them based in Massachusetts, helped establish formal and informal schools in the former American colonies and planned for a college, which opened for classes as Liberia College (now the University of Liberia) in 1863. How did these American sponsors manage an institution over four thousand miles away?

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Public Program Dr. Zabdiel Boylston Adams: Surgeon & Soldier for the Union 23 April 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm Mitchell L. Adams For Zabdiel Boylston Adams, an 1853 graduate of Harvard Medical School, the Civil War was a ...

For Zabdiel Boylston Adams, an 1853 graduate of Harvard Medical School, the Civil War was a watershed and a defining period. On the afternoon of July 2, 1863, the doctor set up a makeshift hospital close to the field of battle. Having noticed how many soldiers were dying during transport from combat to distant medical care, Adams pioneered on-site medical treatments. He labored so long in surgeries at Gettysburg that he was nearly blinded with exhaustion. At the Battle of the Wilderness Adams was severely wounded. Captured by Confederate forces, his shattered left leg useless and gangrenous, he treated himself by pouring pure nitric acid into his wounds, a treatment that must have been as excruciating as it was efficacious. A man at the nexus of two distinguished New England families—Boylston and Adams—at a particularly dramatic moment in history, Dr. Adams is more than an ancestor or historical figure; to his great-grandson, Mitchell L. Adams, he is a legend.

To Reserve: Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

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Public Program Marching in the Margins: 19th-Century African American Women in the Civil War 25 April 2014.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Gallery Talk L'Merchie Frazier, Museum of African American History Massachusetts women played a vital role in recruiting, supporting, and caring for the men who fought ...

Massachusetts women played a vital role in recruiting, supporting, and caring for the men who fought in the Civil War. Learn more about their heroic efforts through Society's current exhibition Tell It with Pride. L'Merchie Frazier, Director of Education at Boston's Museum of African American History will be on hand to discuss some of the evocative photographs and objects on display.

To Register: This program is free and open to the public.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 26 April 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Panel Discussion: American Catholics and U.S. Immigration Policy before the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 29 April 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Danielle Battisti, University of Nebraska, Gráinne McEvoy, Boston College Comment: Justin Poché, College of the Holy Cross McEvoy’s paper, “‘A Christian and Democratic Attitude’: The Catholic ...

McEvoy’s paper, “‘A Christian and Democratic Attitude’: The Catholic Campaign for Education and Enlightenment on U.S. Immigration Policy, 1952-1957,” examines the Catholic campaign for comprehensive immigration reform during and in the wake of the McCarran-Walter Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, which removed discrimination on the basis of race from federal immigration policy but retained the national origins quota system. Battisti’s essay, “‘Whom Shall We Welcome?’ Italian Americans and Immigration Reform Campaigns, 1948-1965,” examines the efforts of Italian Americans who both assisted Italian immigrants to the U.S. after World War II and who joined in a broader movement to abolish the national origins system and thereby reform the nation’s immigration policies in the 1950s and 1960s.

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Author Talk, Public Program Jefferson & Hamilton: The Rivalry that Forged a Nation 30 April 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm John Ferling Annual Jefferson Lecture Jefferson and Hamilton is the story of the fierce struggle—both public and, ultimately, ...

Jefferson and Hamilton is the story of the fierce struggle—both public and, ultimately, bitterly personal—between two titans. Both men were visionaries, but their visions of what the United States should be were diametrically opposed. Jefferson believed passionately in individual liberty and a more egalitarian society, with a weak central government and greater powers for the states. Hamilton sought to build a powerful national government that could ensure the young nation’s security and drive it toward economic greatness.

John Ferling, a leading authority on late 18th and early 19th century American history, is the author of many books, including Almost a Miracle: The American Victory in the War for Independence, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800, Setting the World Ablaze: Washington, Adams, and Jefferson in the American Revolution, and the award-winning A Leap in the Dark: The Struggle to Create the American Republic.

To Reserve: There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

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Early American History Seminar Through Novanglus’s Eyes: Forms of Empire in India 6 May 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Hari Vishwanadha, Santa Monica College Comment: Eliga H. Gould, University of New Hampshire Yankee merchants in the India trade successfully negotiated the competing claims of Indian society ...

Yankee merchants in the India trade successfully negotiated the competing claims of Indian society and the British Raj. As the empire flourished, the merchants prospered. The experiences of two prominent men, Henry Lee and Charles Eliot Norton, are representative of the rich and complex relationship among the three peoples and their cultures and served as a template for subsequent merchants engaged in the India trade during the nineteenth century.

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Notice Library Closing @ 2:30 PM 7 May 2014.Wednesday, all day details
Brown Bag The Poor Always with You: Poverty in an Age of Emancipation, 1833-1879 7 May 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Chris Florio, Princeton University Poverty and slavery are monumental problems – but today we assume they are separate problems. ...

Poverty and slavery are monumental problems – but today we assume they are separate problems. In the mid-nineteenth century, however, American and British observers struggled to distinguish the poor from the slave. Tracing a key shift in the moral imagination, my dissertation explores how the boundaries of poverty and slavery blurred during the so-called “age of emancipation.” I ask: how did poverty and slavery, as political categories and social conditions, entangle with one another in locations spanning the United States and the British Empire?

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Member Event, Special Event John F. Kennedy Medal Presentation 7 May 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:00PM SOLD OUT The event is sold out. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0552. ...

The event is sold out. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0552.

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to attend the presentation of The John F. Kennedy Medal to David McCullough.

5:30 PM: reception

6:00 PM: presentation of the medal with remarks by David McCullough

Seating is limited.

Kennedy Medal

 

 

 

 

 

 

The John F. Kennedy Medal is awarded by the Massachusetts Historical Society to persons who have rendered distinguished service to the cause of history. It is not limited to any field of history or to any particular kind of service to history.

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Public Program The Adams Portraits & Other Treats: 18th-Century Artist Benjamin Blyth 8 May 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm Bettina A. Norton Benjamin Blyth, the Salem artist of the Society’s iconic portraits of John and Abigail Adams, ...

Benjamin Blyth, the Salem artist of the Society’s iconic portraits of John and Abigail Adams, also left a large, delightful number of other portraits of local families, merchants, and participants in the American Revolution. His brother Samuel, a jack-of-all trades in the construction and home-decorating trades, was far more successful. But because of Benjamin’s flight from Salem to Virginia in 1782, he and his brother seemed to swap careers. Therein lies the tale.

Bettina A. Norton is a retired museum professional. She has published widely in her field, American historical prints. In later years, she was editor and publisher of The Beacon Hill Chronicle and is currently Editor Emerita of the Boston Musical Intelligencer. She is author of Edwin Whitefield: Nineteenth-Century North American Scenery; History of the Boston Naval Shipyard, 1800-1974; Trinity Church: The Story of an Episcopal Parish in the City of Boston; ‘To Create and Foster Architecture: History of the Boston Architectural Center; Prints at the Essex Institute; and over 60 articles on American graphic arts, architecture, and social history. She has lived with her family in a house on Beacon Hill since 1941, and in 1967 she founded Hill House, its community center.

To Reserve: Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

Image: Abigail Adams. Portrait, pastel on paper by Benjamin Blyth, circa 1766.

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Brown Bag Classroom Currents: Childhood Education Reforms in Nineteenth-Century Boston and Buenos Aires 9 May 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Carolina Zumaglini, Florida International University This project traces the origins and evolution of nineteenth-century public educational theories and ...

This project traces the origins and evolution of nineteenth-century public educational theories and their significance to nation-building processes within the Americas. Focusing on the Atlantic seaboard cities of Boston in the United States and Buenos Aires in Argentina as case studies, it analyzes how educational ideas traveled and were reshaped by local conditions. The similarities in the nature and scope—and ultimately, the differences in the implementation—of educational policies in each city supports a larger analysis on the transformation of politics and the shaping of distinct national identities in the nineteenth-century Americas.

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Walking Tour, Public Program Created Equal: Walking Tour of Boston Black Heritage Trail 10 May 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 12:00PM Boston African American National Historic Site Series participants are invited on a walking tour of Boston’s Black Heritage Trail offered in ...

Series participants are invited on a walking tour of Boston’s Black Heritage Trail offered in conjunction with the Created Equal Film & Discussion Series. The tour is presented by our partner organization, Boston African American National Historic Site.

For more information, please call 617-646-0557 or e-mail education@masshist.org.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 10 May 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag The Performance of Miracles: Alexander Graham Bell's Mission to Save the Deaf 12 May 2014.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Katie Booth, University of Pittsburgh Alexander Graham Bell believed that his most important contribution was not the telephone, but his ...

Alexander Graham Bell believed that his most important contribution was not the telephone, but his work to liberate the deaf by destroying their community. He came to Boston in 1871 to teach deaf children through oralism, a method that forbade the use of Sign Language and instead taught deaf children to speak. He quickly became an international leader of the oralist movement, but for the deaf who believed he was robbing them of their language, he became the culture’s greatest enemy.

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Public Program, Special Event An Historical Look at the Goodridge Same Sex Marriage Decision 15 May 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm Chief Justice Margaret H. Marshall Same-sex marriage in Massachusetts began on May 17, 2004, as a result of the ruling in Goodridge ...

Same-sex marriage in Massachusetts began on May 17, 2004, as a result of the ruling in Goodridge v. Department of Public Health, which stated that it was unconstitutional under the Massachusetts Constitution to allow only opposite-sex couples to marry. Chief Justice Marshall will talk about this landmark decision.

Chief Justice Marshall is a former Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, having retired from the Court in December 2010. Appointed to the position in 1999 by Governor A. Paul Cellucci, Chief Justice Marshall was the first woman to serve as Chief Justice, and the second woman appointed to serve as an Associate Justice in the Court's then three hundred and four year history when she was first appointed to the bench in 1996 by Governor William F. Weld.

To Reserve: There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

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Public Program, Brown Bag Louisa Catherine Adams: One Woman, Many Voices 16 May 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Moderator: Beth Luey Panelists: Judith Graham, Margaret Hogan, David Michelmore Louisa Catherine Adams wrote in several genres, including letters, diaries, poetry, and memoirs. ...

Louisa Catherine Adams wrote in several genres, including letters, diaries, poetry, and memoirs. Bring your lunch and join us for a conversation with the editors who have prepared her work for publication, and a biographer who has used it. They will discuss what we can learn about Louisa by listening to her different voices.

To Reserve: This event is free and open to the public.

Image: Louisa Catherine Johnson. Miniature oil portrait, circa 1792.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 17 May 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag Postponed: POSTPONED - NEW DATE TBA Securing the Spanish Main: British Subjecthood and the Peace of 1763 21 May 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Bryan Rosenblithe, Columbia University This talk examines the ways that political, economic, and military contests in the Floridas and ...

This talk examines the ways that political, economic, and military contests in the Floridas and Honduras during the era of the Seven Years War shaped imperial notions of British subjecthood. It also explores how questions related to who counted as a subject influenced British strategic thinking during a time of widely perceived Bourbon revanchism.  

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Exhibitionends Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial 23 May 2014.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington In commemoration of the Civil War battle of Fort Wagner led by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and the men ...


In commemoration of the Civil War battle of Fort Wagner led by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and the men of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment and in cooperation with the Massachusetts Historical Society, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. has organized the exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial.

The exhibition celebrates Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ magisterial Shaw Memorial (1883–1900). When Saint-Gaudens created the monument, he based his likeness of Shaw on photographs of the colonel, but for his depiction of the other soldiers, he hired African American men to pose in his studio. This exhibition seeks to make real the soldiers of the 54th represented anonymously in the memorial. It brings together vintage photographic portraits of members of the regiment and of the men and women who recruited, nursed, taught, and guided them.

Throughout the run of the exhibition special programs are planned in cooperation with the Museum of African American History, the Boston African American National Historic Site, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A, and the Friends of the Public Garden.

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Public Program Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of the U.S. Foreign Service 23 May 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM HdG, Dna. Maria St. Catherine McConnell Bring your lunch and join us as we celebrate the 90th Anniversary of the 1924 U.S. Foreign Service ...

Bring your lunch and join us as we celebrate the 90th Anniversary of the 1924 U.S. Foreign Service Act ("The Rogers Act"), which created the US Foreign Service. We will explore the role of Massachusetts statesmen and diplomats in establishing the U.S. Foreign Service and in pioneering America's diplomatic history and tradition. The Rogers Act was authored by Massachusetts Congressman, John Jacob Rogers (1912-1925) of Lowell, Massachusetts, supported in the US Senate by Henry Cabot Lodge, Chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee (1893-1924), and signed into law by former Massachusetts Governor, President Calvin Coolidge (1923-1929). Men from Massachusetts have also played important roles in America's diplomatic corps, from Boston-born American envoy Benjamin Franklin (America's first diplomat at the father of American diplomacy) to our current Secretary of State, former Massachusetts Senator John Kerry.

HdG, Dna. Maria St. Catherine McConnell is a U.S.-, U.N.-, Vatican-trained & Oxford-educated diplomatic scholar formerly with The American Academy of Diplomacy, and a member of the American Foreign Service Association. She heads the Franklin-Rogers MA Public Commission on American Diplomacy & The U.S. Foreign Service, whose mission includes the promotion of knowledge and appreciation of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as "the birth-state of American diplomacy."

Reservation requested: (617) 646-0557 or education@masshist.

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Library Closed Memorial Day 24 May 2014.Saturday, all day The library at the MHS is closed for the Memorial Day weekend.

The library at the MHS is closed for the Memorial Day weekend.

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Building Closed Memorial Day 26 May 2014.Monday, all day The MHS is closed for Memorial Day.

The MHS is closed for Memorial Day.

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Brown Bag Circulating Counterfeits: Making Money and Its Meanings in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic 28 May 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Katherine Smoak, The Johns Hopkins University Counterfeiting was a ubiquitous problem in the eighteenth-century British Atlantic, encouraged by ...

Counterfeiting was a ubiquitous problem in the eighteenth-century British Atlantic, encouraged by the unstandardized and various nature of eighteenth-century currency. Counterfeiters formed regional and trans-Atlantic networks to produce and circulate debased and forged coin, both British and foreign, and faked reproductions of newly available paper notes.  Reconstructing these networks, I argue that counterfeiters shaped imperial economies in unexpected ways, impacting everything from daily economic practices to the course of economic development, and prompted complex discussions about value, worth and trust in an expanding commercial empire.

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Public Program, Author Talk The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941–1942 28 May 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm Nigel Hamilton Based on years of archival research and interviews with the last surviving aides and Roosevelt ...

Based on years of archival research and interviews with the last surviving aides and Roosevelt family members, Nigel Hamilton offers a definitive account of FDR’s masterful—and underappreciated—command of the Allied war effort. Hamilton takes readers inside FDR’s White House Oval Study—his personal command center—and into the meetings where he battled with Churchill about strategy and tactics and overrode the near mutinies of his own generals and secretary of war.

Time and again, FDR was proven right and his allies and generals were wrong. When the generals wanted to attack the Nazi-fortified coast of France, FDR knew the Allied forces weren’t ready. When Churchill insisted his Far East colonies were loyal and would resist the Japanese, Roosevelt knew it was a fantasy. As Hamilton’s account reaches its climax with the Torch landings in North Africa in late 1942, the tide of war turns in the Allies’ favor and FDR’s genius for psychology and military affairs is clear.

Nigel Hamilton is a bestselling and award-winning biographer of President John F. Kennedy, General Bernard “Monty” Montgomery, and President Bill Clinton, among other subjects. He is a Senior Fellow in the McCormack Graduate School, University of Massachusetts-Boston, and first president of the Biographers International Organization (BIO).

To Reserve: There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

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More events
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 1 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Early American History Seminar Negro Cloth: Mastering the Market for Slave Clothing in Antebellum America 4 March 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Seth Rockman, Brown University Comment: David Quigley, Boston College

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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Brown Bag The Appomattox Effect: Searching for the End of War in the American Civil War and Beyond 5 March 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Michael Vorenberg, Brown University

Americans tend to mark the surrender at Appomattox as the end of the Civil War, but the last battle came more than a month later, the last surrender a month after that, and the official “cessation of hostilities” more than a year later. A similar Appomattox effect shapes the way Americans think of other wars, making people assume, even when well-known facts indicate otherwise, that wars have discrete, identifiable endpoints. This lunch discussion raises some of the issues associated with identifying the end of any U.S. war in light of the search for an end of the Civil War.

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Public Program, Special Event A Traveled First Lady: An Evening with Louisa Catherine Adams 6 March 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm C. James Taylor and Margaret Hogan

In A Traveled First Lady: Writings of Louisa Catherine Adams, editors Margaret Hogan and C. James Taylor selected excerpts from diaries and memoirs of Adams’s most revealing comments on life at European courts, the difficulty of being an outsider, Abigail Adams’s Quincy, and the importance of society and etiquette in early Washington D.C. She is best remembered as one the capital’s most accomplished hostesses as hundreds of guests regularly attended her Tuesday evenings of conversation, music, dancing, and refreshments. Join the editors for a social evening with Louisa. There will be conversation and refreshments—but no dancing!

Margaret A. Hogan is an independent editorial consultant and the former Managing Editor of the Adams Papers at the Massachusetts Historical Society. C. James Taylor is Editor in Chief of the Adams Papers.

To Reserve: There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 8 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Environmental History Seminar The Galveston Spirit: How a Hurricane Remade American Politics 11 March 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Summer A. Shafer, Harvard University Comment: Anthony N. Penna, Northeastern University

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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Public Program Created Equal: The Abolitionists 12 March 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Film Screening & Discussion Facilitated by Joanne Pope Melish, University of Kentucky

The Abolitionists brings to life the struggles of the men and women who led the battle to end slavery.Using this film to ground our discussion, we will explore the lives of the individuals who participated in the antislavery movement: newspaper editor William Lloyd Garrison; former slave, author, and activist Frederick Douglass; Angelina Grimké, daughter of a rich South Carolina slaveholder; Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin; and John Brown, ultimately executed for his armed seizure of the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. Clips from the film will be shown at the event, and the film can be viewed in its entirety at: createdequal.neh.gov.

Joanne Pope Melish is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky and a visiting scholar in American Studies at Brown University. She is the author of Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and “Race” in New England, 1780-1860.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 15 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Public Program, Author Talk The Lodge Women, Their Men and Their Times 17 March 2014.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Emily Lodge

Like a Whitman poem, the saga of the Lodge family has unfolded in tandem with the history of the great American experiment itself. Yet while the biographies of the Lodge patriarchs have been well-documented, the stories of the influential Lodge women have never been authoritatively chronicled. From the earliest days of the American colonies, through the Gilded Age, and into the first years of the 21st century, The Lodge Women Their Men, and Their Times traces her family’s remarkable history through its female figures, constructing a narrative that is at once intensely personal, political, and wholly universal.

Based on archival research, interviews, and personal memoirs, Emily Lodge presents her ancestors' stories largely through their own voices, heard in a rich collection of personal letters exchanged with the luminaries of their times, whose lives were linked with the Lodges by politics, art, and family: Henry Adams, Henry James, Theodore Roosevelt, John Hay, Elizabeth Cameron and Edith Wharton, some of whose letters are published here for the first time.From her unique descendant’s view on a long line of prominent Lodge women, the author recalls their grace, dash, and political influence through a sweep of history that illuminates the pages with the incandescent human truths of a distinguished family's life and times.

Over the last thirty years a fascination with public policy has taken Emily into government, journalism, business and academia. As a print journalist, she focused on law and the courts. As a speech-writer for a US Congressman and a US Ambassador to France, her domain was foreign policy. As an award-winning television documentary researcher for 60 Minutes, she helped prove someone innocent. Emily won an Emmy Award for a CBS News Special Report about education. On moving to Europe, she became a correspondent for Brussel’s leading monthly business magazine. Her ParisVoice features column were known for their witty and perceptive observations about public figures. She has written brochures for companies and helped create a major fund-raising drive for INSEAD, Europe’s premier business school. A graduate of Georgetown University in diplomatic history, she is currently writing news analysis from the Middle East.

To Reserve: This event is free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag "Dam all pumpkin states": King Williams War in the North and Colonial Legitimacy 19 March 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Katie Moore, Boston University

In the spring of 1689, the Dominion of New England collapsed when provisional authorities in Boston and New York seized power. The governor-general was placed under house arrest and the northern garrisons ordered abandoned, exposing the English frontier to ongoing attacks by French and Abenaki soldiers. The following year, ad hoc colonial governments coordinated and launched attacks on Quebec and Montreal. How did Puritan divines and a German militia captain use war with the French to legitimate their authority to colonists, colonial leaders, and Native American allies? How did they justify strategy, finance, and diplomacy? Join us to learn more about this fascinating project. - This event has been rescheduled from February 5, when it was postponed due to snow..

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Special Event An Evening at the Bostonian Society 19 March 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM registration required at no cost This event is open only to members of the Jeremy Belknap Circle.

State Street, 1801Members of the Jeremy Belknap Circle are invited to an evening at the Bostonian Society located at 206 Washington Street in Boston. Brian LeMay and Nat Sheidley will discuss ongoing plans and lead a tour of the building, including the tower (and its resident ghost). A reception will follow.

To register, please call 617-646-0543 or e-mail awolfe@masshist.org.

Join an MHS Fund Giving Circle today!

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Biography Seminar The Days of Their Lives: Using Diaries, Journals, and an "Almanack" to Recover the Past 20 March 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, Harvard University; Louisa Thomas, independent scholar and the author of Conscience; Noelle Baker, The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau Moderator: Susan Ware, General Editor, American National Biography

This program will feature a conversation with Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, 300th Anniversary University Professor at Harvard, who is using diaries (men's and women's) in her broader study of Mormon history; Louisa Thomas, an independent scholar and the author of "Conscience" (about her grandfather Norman Thomas), who is writing a biography of Louisa Catherine Adams; and Noelle Baker, Editorial Consultant to The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau, who is preparing a digital edition of Mary Moody Emerson's diary.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 22 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Boston’s Chinatowns and Recent Senior Migration 25 March 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Nicole Newendorp, Harvard University Comment: Wing-kai To, Bridgewater State University

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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Library Closed Library Closed 27 March 2014.Thursday, all day

Due to maintenance work in the building the MHS library will be closed to researchers on Thursday, 27 March 2014.  Contact the library staff at 617-646-0532 or library@masshist.org with any questions. 

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Member Event, Special Event New Faces & New Acquisitions 27 March 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost This event is open only to new MHS Fellows and Members.

Following a reception, new Fellows and Members are invited to join us for a unique opportunity to learn more about and view a selection of the Society's most recent acquisitions, including letters from a stunning collection of Adams and Cranch family correspondence and items from the Civil War archives of Capt. Luis F. Emilio of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment. Enjoy the chance to view Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial. Please call 617-646-0560 or register online by clicking the ticket icon above.

Become a Member today!

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Special Event, Public Program Tell it with Pride 29 March 2014.Saturday, 12:00PM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A Kathryn Greenthal and Henry Duffy

Visitors are invited to enjoy an afternoon program of exhibition tours and special talks at the MHS related to the Tell It With Pride exhibition.

12:00: Join us for a presentation from the men of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A, a company of civilian re-enactment personnel who keep alive the legacy of the unit through living history displays, educational briefings to the general public, and Civil War period encampments and re-enactments.

1:00 Time to view the exhibition and for informal conversation with the men of the 54th Regiment.

2:00: Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial: Its Context and Its Creation, a lecture by Kathryn Greenthal, author of Augustus Saint-Gaudens: Master Sculptor.

3:00 Consecration and Monument: Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts 54th Regiment, a lecture by Henry Duffy, Curator of Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish, NH.

This program is presented in partnership with the Friends of the Public Garden.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560. Please register if you plan to attend ANY part of this program (even if you can not join us for the entire afternoon).

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Public Program, Author Talk American Jews & America’s Game 1 April 2014.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Larry Ruttman

Larry Ruttman will discuss the four main subjects of his book: baseball; American Jewish life in the United States over the last century; American history; and the revealing personal lives of people involved with the game. Compiled using oral histories gathered from nearly 50 Jewish baseball luminaries (who served the game both on and off the field), Ruttman's book offers an anecdotal study of American Jews and the fellow citizens with whom they interacted during momentous times for America, set against the backdrop of a quintessentially American game that fascinates us all.

Larry Ruttman, Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, is the author of Voices of Brookline, a national finalist for the Award of Merit of the American Association of State and Local History. He has practiced law in Boston for more than fifty years and produces and hosts a television interview show in his hometown of Brookline, Massachusetts.

To Reserve: This event is free and open to the public.

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Early American History Seminar From "Disturbers" to Protectors of the Peace: Baptist Church Discipline and Legalities on the Trans-Appalachian Frontier 1 April 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Jeff Perry, Purdue University Comment: Stephen A. Marini, Wellesley College

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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Brown Bag Liberal Religion and Slavery in America, 1775-1865 2 April 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Christopher Cameron, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

This talk will explore the disparate ways that liberal ministers engaged with the institution of slavery, whether as proslavery thinkers, colonizationists, or radical abolitionists. It will examine the theological underpinnings of liberals' views on slavery, as well as the differences between Unitarian, Universalist, and Transcendentalists' engagement with the institution.

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Public Program Created Equal: Slavery by Another Name & The Freedom Riders 2 April 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Film Screening & Discussion Facilitated by Joanne Pope Melish, University of Kentucky

Based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning book by Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes and often guilty of nothing, who were bought, sold, abused, and subjected to deadly working conditions. Raymond Arsenault’s 2007 book Freedom Riders served as the basis for the film of the same name, which tells the terrifying, moving, and suspenseful story of a time when white and black volunteers riding a bus into the Deep South risked being jailed, beaten, or killed, as white local and state authorities ignored or encouraged violent attacks. Clips from the two films will be shown, and they can be viewed online in their entirety at: createdequal.neh.gov.

Joanne Pope Melish is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky and a visiting scholar in American Studies at Brown University. She is the author of Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and “Race” in New England, 1780-1860.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar "Talents Committed to Your Care": Reading and Writing Antislavery 3 April 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:00PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Mary Kelley, University of Michigan Comment: Elizabeth Maddock Dillon, Northeastern University

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 5 April 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Environmental History Seminar A Mountain in Winter: Wilderness Politics, Economic Development, and the Transformation of Whiteface Mountain into a Modern Ski Center, 1932-1980 8 April 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Jonathan D. Anzalone, Stony Brook University Comment: Jim O’Connell, National Park Service

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 12 April 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar "How can the wife submit?" African Families Negotiate Gender and Slavery in New England 15 April 2014.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 7:00PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Location: Schlesinger Library Gloria Whiting, Harvard University Comment: Barbara Krauthamer, University of Massachusetts—Amherst

Rescheduled from February 13, 2014.

This paper discusses various ways in which the everyday realities of slavery shaped gender relations in Afro-New England families. While the structure of slave families in the region was unusually matrifocal, these families nonetheless exhibited a number of patriarchal tendencies. Enslaved African families in New England therefore complicate the assumption of much scholarship that the structure of slave families defined their normative values.

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Public Program, Exhibition The Battles of the 54th: Northern Racism and the Unequal Pay Crisis 18 April 2014.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM this event is free Gallery Talk Samantha Anderson Grangaard, Northeastern University

When Massachusetts Governor John A. Andrew proposed to raise the first military unit consisting of black soldiers during the Civil War, he was assured by Secretary of War Edwin Stanton that the men would be paid, clothed, and treated in the same way as white troops. As the recruiting posters and newspaper advertisements stated, this included a state bounty and a monthly pay of $13. In July of 1863, an order was issued in Washington fixing the compensation of black soldiers at the laborers' rate of $10 per month. This amount was offered on several occasions to the men of the 54th, but was continually refused. Governor Andrew and the Massachusetts legislature, feeling responsible for the $3 discrepancy in pay promised to the troops, passed an act in November of 1863 providing the difference from state funds. The men refused to accept this resolution, however, demanding that they receive full soldier pay from the federal government.

Learn more about this pay controvery, and how it was resolved, through items on display in our current exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial.

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Building Closed Patriot's Day 21 April 2014.Monday, all day

The MHS is closed for Patriot's Day.

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Teacher Workshop Canceled:
Tell it With Pride: A Workshop for Educators
22 April 2014 to 23 April 2014 registration required

This event has been canceled. Please contact the education department for more information: education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

Join us as we explore the role of African Americans in Massachusetts in the era of the Civil War!

Day one (April 22) will take place at the Massachusetts Historical Society, where participants can view original documents and artifacts that shed light on the antislavery movement, the work of the 54th Regiment and its supporters, and the creation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ memorial on Beacon Street.

Day two (April 23) will take place on Beacon Hill. In the morning, we will take a walking tour through the neighborhood with a ranger from Boston African American National Historic Site. After a lunch on your own at Faneuil Hall, we will regroup for a program at the Museum of African American History, which includes a tour of the recently restored African Meeting House.

This workshop is open to all K-12 teachers and library media specialists. The $55 registration fee covers lunch on April 22, materials, and admission to the Museum of African American History. Teachers can earn 10 Professional Development Points for their participation.

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Brown Bag "Pious Females" and "Good Schools": Transnational Networks of Education in Nineteenth-Century Liberia 23 April 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Marie Stango, University of Michigan

This project examines the networks of men and women who helped support education efforts in the American settlements in Liberia, West Africa. These philanthropists, many of them based in Massachusetts, helped establish formal and informal schools in the former American colonies and planned for a college, which opened for classes as Liberia College (now the University of Liberia) in 1863. How did these American sponsors manage an institution over four thousand miles away?

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Public Program Dr. Zabdiel Boylston Adams: Surgeon & Soldier for the Union 23 April 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm Mitchell L. Adams

For Zabdiel Boylston Adams, an 1853 graduate of Harvard Medical School, the Civil War was a watershed and a defining period. On the afternoon of July 2, 1863, the doctor set up a makeshift hospital close to the field of battle. Having noticed how many soldiers were dying during transport from combat to distant medical care, Adams pioneered on-site medical treatments. He labored so long in surgeries at Gettysburg that he was nearly blinded with exhaustion. At the Battle of the Wilderness Adams was severely wounded. Captured by Confederate forces, his shattered left leg useless and gangrenous, he treated himself by pouring pure nitric acid into his wounds, a treatment that must have been as excruciating as it was efficacious. A man at the nexus of two distinguished New England families—Boylston and Adams—at a particularly dramatic moment in history, Dr. Adams is more than an ancestor or historical figure; to his great-grandson, Mitchell L. Adams, he is a legend.

To Reserve: Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

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Public Program Marching in the Margins: 19th-Century African American Women in the Civil War 25 April 2014.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM this event is free Gallery Talk L'Merchie Frazier, Museum of African American History

Massachusetts women played a vital role in recruiting, supporting, and caring for the men who fought in the Civil War. Learn more about their heroic efforts through Society's current exhibition Tell It with Pride. L'Merchie Frazier, Director of Education at Boston's Museum of African American History will be on hand to discuss some of the evocative photographs and objects on display.

To Register: This program is free and open to the public.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 26 April 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Panel Discussion: American Catholics and U.S. Immigration Policy before the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 29 April 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Danielle Battisti, University of Nebraska, Gráinne McEvoy, Boston College Comment: Justin Poché, College of the Holy Cross

McEvoy’s paper, “‘A Christian and Democratic Attitude’: The Catholic Campaign for Education and Enlightenment on U.S. Immigration Policy, 1952-1957,” examines the Catholic campaign for comprehensive immigration reform during and in the wake of the McCarran-Walter Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, which removed discrimination on the basis of race from federal immigration policy but retained the national origins quota system. Battisti’s essay, “‘Whom Shall We Welcome?’ Italian Americans and Immigration Reform Campaigns, 1948-1965,” examines the efforts of Italian Americans who both assisted Italian immigrants to the U.S. after World War II and who joined in a broader movement to abolish the national origins system and thereby reform the nation’s immigration policies in the 1950s and 1960s.

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Author Talk, Public Program Jefferson & Hamilton: The Rivalry that Forged a Nation 30 April 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm John Ferling Annual Jefferson Lecture

Jefferson and Hamilton is the story of the fierce struggle—both public and, ultimately, bitterly personal—between two titans. Both men were visionaries, but their visions of what the United States should be were diametrically opposed. Jefferson believed passionately in individual liberty and a more egalitarian society, with a weak central government and greater powers for the states. Hamilton sought to build a powerful national government that could ensure the young nation’s security and drive it toward economic greatness.

John Ferling, a leading authority on late 18th and early 19th century American history, is the author of many books, including Almost a Miracle: The American Victory in the War for Independence, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800, Setting the World Ablaze: Washington, Adams, and Jefferson in the American Revolution, and the award-winning A Leap in the Dark: The Struggle to Create the American Republic.

To Reserve: There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

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Early American History Seminar Through Novanglus’s Eyes: Forms of Empire in India 6 May 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Hari Vishwanadha, Santa Monica College Comment: Eliga H. Gould, University of New Hampshire

Yankee merchants in the India trade successfully negotiated the competing claims of Indian society and the British Raj. As the empire flourished, the merchants prospered. The experiences of two prominent men, Henry Lee and Charles Eliot Norton, are representative of the rich and complex relationship among the three peoples and their cultures and served as a template for subsequent merchants engaged in the India trade during the nineteenth century.

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Notice Library Closing @ 2:30 PM 7 May 2014.Wednesday, all day close
Brown Bag The Poor Always with You: Poverty in an Age of Emancipation, 1833-1879 7 May 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Chris Florio, Princeton University

Poverty and slavery are monumental problems – but today we assume they are separate problems. In the mid-nineteenth century, however, American and British observers struggled to distinguish the poor from the slave. Tracing a key shift in the moral imagination, my dissertation explores how the boundaries of poverty and slavery blurred during the so-called “age of emancipation.” I ask: how did poverty and slavery, as political categories and social conditions, entangle with one another in locations spanning the United States and the British Empire?

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Member Event, Special Event John F. Kennedy Medal Presentation 7 May 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:00PM registration required at no cost SOLD OUT

The event is sold out. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0552.

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to attend the presentation of The John F. Kennedy Medal to David McCullough.

5:30 PM: reception

6:00 PM: presentation of the medal with remarks by David McCullough

Seating is limited.

Kennedy Medal

 

 

 

 

 

 

The John F. Kennedy Medal is awarded by the Massachusetts Historical Society to persons who have rendered distinguished service to the cause of history. It is not limited to any field of history or to any particular kind of service to history.

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Public Program The Adams Portraits & Other Treats: 18th-Century Artist Benjamin Blyth 8 May 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm Bettina A. Norton

Benjamin Blyth, the Salem artist of the Society’s iconic portraits of John and Abigail Adams, also left a large, delightful number of other portraits of local families, merchants, and participants in the American Revolution. His brother Samuel, a jack-of-all trades in the construction and home-decorating trades, was far more successful. But because of Benjamin’s flight from Salem to Virginia in 1782, he and his brother seemed to swap careers. Therein lies the tale.

Bettina A. Norton is a retired museum professional. She has published widely in her field, American historical prints. In later years, she was editor and publisher of The Beacon Hill Chronicle and is currently Editor Emerita of the Boston Musical Intelligencer. She is author of Edwin Whitefield: Nineteenth-Century North American Scenery; History of the Boston Naval Shipyard, 1800-1974; Trinity Church: The Story of an Episcopal Parish in the City of Boston; ‘To Create and Foster Architecture: History of the Boston Architectural Center; Prints at the Essex Institute; and over 60 articles on American graphic arts, architecture, and social history. She has lived with her family in a house on Beacon Hill since 1941, and in 1967 she founded Hill House, its community center.

To Reserve: Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

Image: Abigail Adams. Portrait, pastel on paper by Benjamin Blyth, circa 1766.

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Brown Bag Classroom Currents: Childhood Education Reforms in Nineteenth-Century Boston and Buenos Aires 9 May 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Carolina Zumaglini, Florida International University

This project traces the origins and evolution of nineteenth-century public educational theories and their significance to nation-building processes within the Americas. Focusing on the Atlantic seaboard cities of Boston in the United States and Buenos Aires in Argentina as case studies, it analyzes how educational ideas traveled and were reshaped by local conditions. The similarities in the nature and scope—and ultimately, the differences in the implementation—of educational policies in each city supports a larger analysis on the transformation of politics and the shaping of distinct national identities in the nineteenth-century Americas.

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Walking Tour, Public Program Created Equal: Walking Tour of Boston Black Heritage Trail 10 May 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 12:00PM registration required at no cost Boston African American National Historic Site

Series participants are invited on a walking tour of Boston’s Black Heritage Trail offered in conjunction with the Created Equal Film & Discussion Series. The tour is presented by our partner organization, Boston African American National Historic Site.

For more information, please call 617-646-0557 or e-mail education@masshist.org.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 10 May 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag The Performance of Miracles: Alexander Graham Bell's Mission to Save the Deaf 12 May 2014.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Katie Booth, University of Pittsburgh

Alexander Graham Bell believed that his most important contribution was not the telephone, but his work to liberate the deaf by destroying their community. He came to Boston in 1871 to teach deaf children through oralism, a method that forbade the use of Sign Language and instead taught deaf children to speak. He quickly became an international leader of the oralist movement, but for the deaf who believed he was robbing them of their language, he became the culture’s greatest enemy.

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Public Program, Special Event An Historical Look at the Goodridge Same Sex Marriage Decision 15 May 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm Chief Justice Margaret H. Marshall

Same-sex marriage in Massachusetts began on May 17, 2004, as a result of the ruling in Goodridge v. Department of Public Health, which stated that it was unconstitutional under the Massachusetts Constitution to allow only opposite-sex couples to marry. Chief Justice Marshall will talk about this landmark decision.

Chief Justice Marshall is a former Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, having retired from the Court in December 2010. Appointed to the position in 1999 by Governor A. Paul Cellucci, Chief Justice Marshall was the first woman to serve as Chief Justice, and the second woman appointed to serve as an Associate Justice in the Court's then three hundred and four year history when she was first appointed to the bench in 1996 by Governor William F. Weld.

To Reserve: There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

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Public Program, Brown Bag Louisa Catherine Adams: One Woman, Many Voices 16 May 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Moderator: Beth Luey Panelists: Judith Graham, Margaret Hogan, David Michelmore

Louisa Catherine Adams wrote in several genres, including letters, diaries, poetry, and memoirs. Bring your lunch and join us for a conversation with the editors who have prepared her work for publication, and a biographer who has used it. They will discuss what we can learn about Louisa by listening to her different voices.

To Reserve: This event is free and open to the public.

Image: Louisa Catherine Johnson. Miniature oil portrait, circa 1792.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 17 May 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag Postponed:
POSTPONED - NEW DATE TBA Securing the Spanish Main: British Subjecthood and the Peace of 1763
21 May 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Bryan Rosenblithe, Columbia University

This talk examines the ways that political, economic, and military contests in the Floridas and Honduras during the era of the Seven Years War shaped imperial notions of British subjecthood. It also explores how questions related to who counted as a subject influenced British strategic thinking during a time of widely perceived Bourbon revanchism.  

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Exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial 23 May 2014.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM this event is free Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington


In commemoration of the Civil War battle of Fort Wagner led by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and the men of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment and in cooperation with the Massachusetts Historical Society, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. has organized the exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial.

The exhibition celebrates Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ magisterial Shaw Memorial (1883–1900). When Saint-Gaudens created the monument, he based his likeness of Shaw on photographs of the colonel, but for his depiction of the other soldiers, he hired African American men to pose in his studio. This exhibition seeks to make real the soldiers of the 54th represented anonymously in the memorial. It brings together vintage photographic portraits of members of the regiment and of the men and women who recruited, nursed, taught, and guided them.

Throughout the run of the exhibition special programs are planned in cooperation with the Museum of African American History, the Boston African American National Historic Site, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A, and the Friends of the Public Garden.

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Public Program Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of the U.S. Foreign Service 23 May 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free HdG, Dna. Maria St. Catherine McConnell

Bring your lunch and join us as we celebrate the 90th Anniversary of the 1924 U.S. Foreign Service Act ("The Rogers Act"), which created the US Foreign Service. We will explore the role of Massachusetts statesmen and diplomats in establishing the U.S. Foreign Service and in pioneering America's diplomatic history and tradition. The Rogers Act was authored by Massachusetts Congressman, John Jacob Rogers (1912-1925) of Lowell, Massachusetts, supported in the US Senate by Henry Cabot Lodge, Chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee (1893-1924), and signed into law by former Massachusetts Governor, President Calvin Coolidge (1923-1929). Men from Massachusetts have also played important roles in America's diplomatic corps, from Boston-born American envoy Benjamin Franklin (America's first diplomat at the father of American diplomacy) to our current Secretary of State, former Massachusetts Senator John Kerry.

HdG, Dna. Maria St. Catherine McConnell is a U.S.-, U.N.-, Vatican-trained & Oxford-educated diplomatic scholar formerly with The American Academy of Diplomacy, and a member of the American Foreign Service Association. She heads the Franklin-Rogers MA Public Commission on American Diplomacy & The U.S. Foreign Service, whose mission includes the promotion of knowledge and appreciation of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as "the birth-state of American diplomacy."

Reservation requested: (617) 646-0557 or education@masshist.

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Library Closed Memorial Day 24 May 2014.Saturday, all day

The library at the MHS is closed for the Memorial Day weekend.

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Building Closed Memorial Day 26 May 2014.Monday, all day

The MHS is closed for Memorial Day.

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Brown Bag Circulating Counterfeits: Making Money and Its Meanings in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic 28 May 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Katherine Smoak, The Johns Hopkins University

Counterfeiting was a ubiquitous problem in the eighteenth-century British Atlantic, encouraged by the unstandardized and various nature of eighteenth-century currency. Counterfeiters formed regional and trans-Atlantic networks to produce and circulate debased and forged coin, both British and foreign, and faked reproductions of newly available paper notes.  Reconstructing these networks, I argue that counterfeiters shaped imperial economies in unexpected ways, impacting everything from daily economic practices to the course of economic development, and prompted complex discussions about value, worth and trust in an expanding commercial empire.

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Public Program, Author Talk The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941–1942 28 May 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm Nigel Hamilton

Based on years of archival research and interviews with the last surviving aides and Roosevelt family members, Nigel Hamilton offers a definitive account of FDR’s masterful—and underappreciated—command of the Allied war effort. Hamilton takes readers inside FDR’s White House Oval Study—his personal command center—and into the meetings where he battled with Churchill about strategy and tactics and overrode the near mutinies of his own generals and secretary of war.

Time and again, FDR was proven right and his allies and generals were wrong. When the generals wanted to attack the Nazi-fortified coast of France, FDR knew the Allied forces weren’t ready. When Churchill insisted his Far East colonies were loyal and would resist the Japanese, Roosevelt knew it was a fantasy. As Hamilton’s account reaches its climax with the Torch landings in North Africa in late 1942, the tide of war turns in the Allies’ favor and FDR’s genius for psychology and military affairs is clear.

Nigel Hamilton is a bestselling and award-winning biographer of President John F. Kennedy, General Bernard “Monty” Montgomery, and President Bill Clinton, among other subjects. He is a Senior Fellow in the McCormack Graduate School, University of Massachusetts-Boston, and first president of the Biographers International Organization (BIO).

To Reserve: There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

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