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This Week @ MHS

It's time again for the weekly round-up of events coming your way. Here's what's on tap at the Society this week:

- Wednesday, 15 June, 12:00PM : The first of two Brown Bag lunch talks this week is given by Zach Hutchins of Colorado State University and is titled "Briton Hammon in the Archives" and traces the circum-Atlantic journey of Massachusetts resident Briton Hammon. The enslaved Hammon published a narrative of his travels in 1760, an account many have described as the first slave narrative. This talk is free and open to the public. Please join us!

- Wednesday, 15 June, 6:00PM : Also on Wednesday is an author talk with Daniel R. Coquillette and Bruce A. Kimball who will discuss their book On the Battlefield of Merit: Harvard Law School, the First Century. Currently working on the second volume that will bring the story to the present, the authors will also relate this history to recent challenges faced by the school including questions of the relation of its seal to a fortune made on the backs of slaves. This talk is open to the public for a fee of $20 (no charge for MHS Members and Fellows). A pre-talk reception begins at 5:30PM and the program begins at 6:00PM. 

- Friday, 17 June, 12:00PM : The second Brown Bag of the week features Ben Davidson of New York University who presents "Freedom's Generation: Coming of Age in the Era of Emancipation." Davidson's research traces the lives of the generation of black and white children, in the North, South, and West, who grew up during the Civil War era and were the first generation to come of age after the end of slavery. This talk is free and open to the public. Pack a lunch and come on in!

- Saturday, 18 June, 10:00AM : The History and Collections of the MHS is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition.

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 12 June, 2016, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

There is a new exhibit on the way this week, as well as a couple of public programs for you. Here is what's lined up:

- Monday, 6 June, 6:00PM : When Mount Auburn Cemetery was founded in 1831 it revolutionized the way Americans mourned the dead by offering a peaceful space for contemplation. Join us to hear author Stephen Kendrick tell the story of Mount Auburn's founding, its legacy, and the many influential Americans interred there. This story is captured in Kendrick's latest book The Lively Place: Mount Auburn, America's First Garden Cemetery, and Its Revolutionary and Literary Residents. This author talk is open the public and registration is required at a cost of $20 (no charge for MHS Members or Fellows). A reception begins at 5:30PM and the talk begins at 6:00PM.

- Friday, 10 June, 10:00AM : The Private Jefferson has left the building and we are happy to present our next exhibition, "Turning Points in American History." This presentation examines 15 decisive moments when everything suddenly changed or a process began that would change what followed, described in eyewitness accounts and personal records, or commemorated by "dumb witnesses" -- artifacts found in the Society's collections. The exhibitions galleries are open to the public free of charge Monday-Saturday, 10:00AM-4:00PM. 

- Friday, 10 June, 12:00PM : Also on Friday is a Brown Bag lunch talk given by Gregory Michna of West Virginia University. "A Communion of Churches: Indian Christians, English Ministers, and Congregations in New England, 1600-1775" explores Puritan and Native American efforts to build religious communities throughout the span of colonial New England. This talk is free and open to the public. Pack a lunch and stop by!

- Saturday 11 June, 10:00AM : After a multi-week hiatus, our public tour is back! Come by on Saturday for The History and Collections of the MHS, a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public spaces. The tour is open to the public free of charge with no need for reservations for individuals or small groups. Larger parties of 8 or more should contact Curator of Art Anne Bentleh in advance at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org

- Saturday, 11 June, 5:00PM : The American President: From Teddy Roosevelt to Bill Clinton charts the enormous growth of presidential power from its lowly state in the nineteenth century to the imperial presidency of the twentieth. Join author and presidential historian William Leuchtenburg as he talks about his news book. Registration is required for this event at a cost of $20 (no charge for MHS Members or Fellows). A pre-talk reception begins at 4:30PM and the talk begins at 5:00PM

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 5 June, 2016, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

Reminder: The Society is CLOSED on Monday, 30 May, in observance of Memorial Day.

As we slide into the summer months here at the MHS, our programming slows down just a little bit compared to the past few weeks. But don't let yourself think that there is nothing going on! Here is what we have on tap for our holiday-shortened week:

- Wednesday, 1 June, 12:00PM : The first Brown Bag talk of the month features Kevin Waite of the University of Pennsylvania. His project tracks proslavery activity in California and Southerners' attempts to capture the Pacific trade, highlighting the centrality of the Far West in the nation's road to disunion. His talk, titled "The Slave South in the Far West: California, the Pacific, and Proslavery Visions of Empire, 1800-1865," is open to the public free of charge. Pack a lunch and check it out!

- Thursday, 2 June, 6:00PM : Join us for "The Road to Concord and Stamp Act Stamp Unveiling." This combined author talk/public program features author and MHS Fellow J.L. Bell, proprietor of Boston1775.net, sharing highlights from his recent book The Road to Concord: How Four Stolen Cannon Ignited the Revolutionary War, and how the Society's collections provided vital clues to this untold story. As a special treat, the U.S. Postal Service will join us for the Massachusetts unveiling of a new stamp commemorating the 250th anniversary of the end of the Stamp Act crisis, the first act of the American Revolution. This talk is free and open to the public but registration is required. A pre-talk reception begins at 5:30PM.

- Friday, 3 June, 12:00PM : The second Brown Bag talk this week is "'A Just and Honest Valuation': Money and Value in Colonial American, 1690-1750." Come in and listen to Katie Moore, Boston University, whose project argues that colonists mediated economic change within existing moral and social frameworks by re-imagining the origins and nature of value as extrinsic, a conceptual shift reflected in their use of paper money. This talk is free and open to the public. Won't you join us?

Note: The Library closes early on Friday, 3 June, at 3:00PM.

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 29 May, 2016, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

It's tough to be believe that we are almost at the end of the month, but here we are hurtling toward Memorial Day. Before the summer unofficially begins, come by the MHS for some history! Once again, we have a week that is heavy with Brown Bag talks, along with a couple other items of note. 

- Monday, 23 May, 12:00PM : Karen Weyler, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, kicks off the week with her Brown Bag entitled "Serendipity and Literary History: The Problem of 'Firstness' in Histories of the American Novel." Weyler discusses how some of her findings here at the MHS might challenge traditional inception points for literary histories of fiction in British Ameria and the early United States. As always, Brown Bag talks are free and open to the public. 

- Tuesday, 24 May, 6:00PM : Join us for a conversation with Joseph Bagley, Boston Archaeologist and Author, who will talk about "A History of Boston in 50 Artifacts." As a result of the Big Dig and the artifacts it unearthed, Bagley uncovers a fascinating hodgepodge of history that will surprise and delight even longtime residents. This talk is open to the public free of charge, though registration is required. A pre-talk reception begins at 5:30PM and the program starts at 6:00PM. 

- Wednesday, 25 May, 12:00PM : The second Brown Bag talk of the week is "'For the Good of the Country': Captive Trade Networks in the Colonial Northeast, 1630-1763." Join Joanne Jahnke Wegner, University of Minnesota, as she discusses her project which examines the commodification of captive peoples who were trafficked in the colonies, across imperial borders, and into the Atlantic world. This talk is free and open to the public. 

- Thursday, 26 May : This is your last chance to view The Private Jefferson, our current exhibition. The exhibit will close for good at 4:00PM on Thursday. Be sure to come in for a look before it's gone!

- Friday, 27 May, 12:00PM : To round out the trifecta of Brown Bag talks this week, stop by on Friday for "From the Partisan Press to the Political Procedural." This talk features Mary Hale of the University of Illinois - Chicago, whose project considers the development of a new post-Civil War genre of political novels specifically by looking at Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner's The Gilded Age and Henry Adams' Democracy.  

The Society is CLOSED on Saturday, 28 May, and Monday, 30 May, in observance of Memorial Day. Normal hours resume on Tuesday, 31 May

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 22 May, 2016, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

It feels like spring finally arrived here in Boston. Why not get outside and take a walk to the MHS for some public programs? This week we are heavy on our lunchtime Brown Bag talks, but there are also a couple other public programs to balance things out. Here's what's coming:

- Monday, 16 May, 12:00PM : The first Brown Bag talk of the week is titled "Valuing the Body of the Enslaved: From the Cradle to the Grave." Pack a lunch and come listen to short-term research fellow Daina Ramey Berry of the University of Texas at Austin. Berry presents her framework for understanding the valuation of enslaved peoples from birth to beyond death, based on 10 years of research in northern and southern archives. This talk is free and open to the public. 

- Monday, 16 May, 6:00PM : "Jefferson the Architect" is the final public program from the Jefferson Series, which centers around our current exhibition. In this talk, Henry Adams of Case Western Reserve University explores the impact of Jefferson in American architecture and the legacy he has left on our country's built environment. This talk is open to the public, though registration is required with a fee of $20 (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members). There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30PM and the talk begins at 6:00PM. 

 - Wednesday, 18 May, 12:00PM : Brown Bag talk number two this week is presented by Sarah Templier of Johns Hopkins University, and is called "The Lives of Textiles: Trading and Consuming Clothing, Fabrics, and Apparel Accessories in French and British North America, 1720s-1770s." The progam presents an overview of Templier's dissertation research. This talk is free and open to the public. 

- Thursday, 19 May, 6:00PM : POSTPONED: "Mass Momentum: Highlighting the Innovation Hub."

- Friday, 20 May, 12:00PM : The third and final Brown Bag talk this week features Travis Jacquess, University of Mississippi. In his talk, "'My Principles for Government...Are Fixed,' Declarations of Independence between Fathers and Sons in the Age of Revolution," Jacquess argues that the spirit of of independence - the spirit of '76 - gave rise to the spirit of individualism, which was passed from father to son as a natural product of their experience in the Revolution and their engagement in the new American Republic. This talk is free and open to the public. 

- Saturday, 21 May, 1:00PM : Join us for the final instalment of this season's discussion of primary readings, Begin at the Beginning, led by Dr. Abby Chandler. "John Gyles' Odd Adventure : A Different Captivity Narrative" tells a story of his upbringing among the Micmac and Maliseet peoples: a story of understanding and respect, unlike most Puritan captivity narratives that tell tales of horror and fear. This program is open to the public and registration is required at no cost; Please RSVP

Finally, if you have not yet come in to see the Private Jefferson, your time is running out. The exhibition remains on view to the public through Wednesday, May 26. Don't miss it!

There is no Saturday tour this week

 

 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 15 May, 2016, 12:00 AM

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