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This Week @ MHS

October arrives this week and with it comes a slew of public programs at the Society. Here is what is on tap this week: 

First, on Wednesday, 1 October, there is a Brown Bag talk starting at 12:00PM. Come by to hear Sean Moore of the University of New Hampshire present "Reading Locke on the Plantation." This examines the well-known paradox of early Americans asserting their desire for freedom while, at the same time, enslaving others. The project examines how the African diaspora underwrote the dissemination of British books of literature and philosophy while considering the political theory of Locke. This talk is free and open to the public. 

Also on Wednesday is "The Trials of Old New England Towns in a New Nation," an author talk featuring independent scholar Mary Babson Fuhrer. In this talk, Fuhrer will discuss the remarkable stories of conflict and transformation that reshaped local communities in the decades leading up to the Civil War. Her research with various diaries, letters, and account books form the basis of her recent book, Crisis of Community: Trials and Transformation of a New England Town, 1815-1848. This talk is open to the public with a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register. There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30PM and the program begins at 6:00PM.

On Thursday, 2 October, is this season's first edition of the History of Women and Gender seminar series: "Enslaved Women and the Politics of Self-Liberation in Revolutionary North America." This paper, presented by Barbara Krauthamer of University of Massachusetts, Amherst, examines enslaved women's strategies for gaining freedom through escape, focusing on their escape from bondage and their concomitant movements to various sites in the Americas. Comment is provided by Kate Masur, Northwestern University. This talk takes places at Harvard's Schlesinger Library, begins at 5:30PM, and is free and open to the public, RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

And on Saturday, 4 October, join us for a free tour through the public space in the Society's building at 1154 Boylston Street. The tour is free and open to the public and begins at 10:00AM. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

 

 

 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 28 September, 2014, 12:00 PM

This Week @ MHS

Hard to believe that we are already in the last week of September, but so it is. With the closing of the month comes the dawn of seminar season here at the MHS, and while there are only a couple of programs this week, it signals the coming of a much busier October. Here is what's on tap:

On Tuesday, 23 September, come by for this year's first installment of the Immigration and Urban History seminar series, "The Importance of Place and Place-makers in the Life of a Los Angeles Community: What Gentrification Erases from Echo Park, 1950s-Present." In this talk, Natalia Molina of the University of California - San Diego, examines and discusses the history of the Los Angeles neighborhood, Echo Park, shaped by its Leftist, Communist, and gay residents. Ms. Molina's project asks what the role of history is in the neighborhood's evolving identity. Comment provided by Judith Smith, University of Massachusetts - Boston. The talk begins at 5:15PM and is free and open to the public, though RSVP is required. You can also Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers. 

Also on this week is the final event in a series of teacher workshops called "Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation." This edition of the workshop takes place at the Framingham History Center on Friday and Saturday, 26 and 27 September. Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215. There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. 

And on Saturday, 27 September, is another free tour at the Society, "The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society." This 90-minute docent-led tour is free and open to the public and begins at 10:00AM. There is no need to make reservations for individuals or small groups, but parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information, please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org. While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I." This exhibit is open Monday-Saturday, 10:00AM-4:00PM, free of charge. 

As always, be sure to keep an eye on our online events calendar to see what other programs are coming up at the Society. We hope to see you here soon!

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Saturday, 20 September, 2014, 3:46 PM

This Week @ MHS

Calling all graduate students! 

Are you studying American history or some other related subject? Are you interested in meeting fellow students and faculty members who work in your field? Then consider attending a special Graduate Student Reception at the Massachusetts Historical Society this week. Beginning at 6:00PM on Thursday, 18 September, this event is a great way to network with your peers in the area, tour our historic building at 1154 Boylston Street, and to learn about the range of resources available to support your work, including MHS fellowship programs. This event is free for graduate students and faculty members, though RSVP required by September 17. Email kviens@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568 with your name and affiliation. Indicate whether you are a graduate student or faculty member. We hope to see you there!

Also at the Society this week, we continue our exhibition of World War I photographs, letters and memorabilia with "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I." As always, the exhibit is open Monday - Saturday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM, free of charge. And on Saturday, 20 September, stop by at 10:00AM for "The History and Collections of the MHS," a free 90-minute tour of the Society's building. The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Saturday, 13 September, 2014, 5:31 PM

This Week @ MHS

It seems that summer is trying to reassert itself here in September but it is quiet and cool at the MHS. There is but one public program on the calendar this week in the form of a Brown Bag lunch talk on Wednesday, 10 September. Come by at noon for "Sculpting the Citizen Soldier: Civil War Memory and the Life Cycle of Monuments," presented by short-term research fellow Sarah Beetham, University of Delaware. In this talk, Dr. Beetham will explore how Civil War citizen soldier monuments have factored into community life in the century and a half since the war’s end. Soldier monuments have been interpreted and interpreted, vandalized and hit by cars, amended and moved to new locations. How do these interventions affect our understanding of post-Civil War memory? This talk is open to the public free of charge. 

There is also a free tour this week on Saturday, 13 September, starting at 10:00AM. "The History and Collections of the MHS" is a 90-minute, docent-led tour that allows visitors to see all of the public spaces at the Society while learning about the art, architecture, history, and collections in the building at 1154 Boylston. The tour is free and open to the public with no reservations required for individuals or small groups. However, groups of 8 or more should contact the MHS before attending the tour. For more information, please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org

And while this September is pretty quiet here at the MHS, seminar season is nearly upon us. Be sure to keep an eye on the online events calendar to see all of the public events on tap later this month and into October. 

 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 7 September, 2014, 12:00 PM

This Week @ MHS

**Please note that the Society is closed on Monday, 1 September, in observance of Labor Day.**

September is upon us and it makes its appearance quietly as we begin the month with a holiday closure. The only main item of note this week on the calendar is a Brown Bag lunch talk on Wednesday, 3 September. Come by the MHS at noon for "Unspeakable Loss: North America's Invisible Throat Distemper Epidemic of 1735-1765," presented by Nicholad Bonneau, University of Notre Dame. While the New England throat distemper epidemic never achieved the notoriety acquired by other more notorious diseases of the colonial era, no single epidemic of that period proved more deadly to European settlers. This project asks why this epidemic escaped comment by contemporaries and past historians while raising interpretive questions informing our larger views of change, the priority of documentation, and the role of memory. This talk is free and open to the public so pack a lunch and come on by! 

And remember that on most Saturdays, including 6 September, you can visit the Society for a free tour. The History and Collections of the MHS is a 90-minute docent-led tour that explores all of the public spaces in the Society's home.. This event is free and open to the public and begins at 10:00AM. And while you are here for the tour you can also view our current exhibition, "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I," open Monday-Saturday, 10:00AM-4:00PM.

**Library Hours Changing! Effective 1 September, the library is no longer open late on Tuesday evenings. New hours for the library are Mon-Fri, 9:00AM-4:45PM, and Saturday, 9:00AM-4:00PM.**

 

 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 31 August, 2014, 12:00 PM

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