The Beehive: the official blog of the Massachusetts Historical Society

Beehive series: Today @MHS

This Week @ MHS

- Tuesday, 2 May, 5:15PM : We start the week with an Early American History Seminar, this time in panel format. "Nathaniel Hawthorne and Friends" is a discussion with Philip Gould of Brown University and Thomas Balcerski of Eastern Connecticut State University. The conversation revolves around their respsective essays, "Hawthorne and the State of War" and "A Work of Friendship." Maurice Lee of Boston University provides comment. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Wednesday, 3 May, 12:00PM : Stephen Engle of Florida Atlantic University leads this week's Brown Bag lunch talk, titled "Politics of Civil War Governance: A Conversation about Lincoln and his Loyal Governors during the Civil War." Engle discusses his most recent book, Gathering to Save a Nation: Lincoln and the Union's War Governors and how it led to his current project, a biography of Massachusetts Governor John Albion Andrew. This talk is free and open to the public. 

- Wednesday, 3 May, 6:00PM : "Where to Go" is the next installment of the Cooking Boston series of public programs here at the MHS, exploring the culinary history of Boston. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston. This event features a discussion with James O'Connell, Corky White, and Eriwn Ramos, moderated by Peter Drummey of the MHS. This talk is open to the public and registration is required with a fee of $20 (no charge for MHS Members of Fellows). A pre-talk reception begins at 5:30PM, followed by the speaking program at 6:00PM. 

- Saturday, 6 May, 10:00AM : The History and Collections of the MHS is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

- Saturday, 6 May, 1:00PM : The practice of slavery in the early modern Atlantic world generated a variety of theological debates about its nature, origins, and legitimacy. "Of One Blood? New England Slavery and Theology," part of the Begin at the Beginning series of talks, is a discussion led by PhD candidate Eduardo Gonzalez of Boston College. This program is open to the public, registration required at no cost. The discussion is based on primary readings listed on the reigstration page. 

  

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 30 April, 2017, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE LIBRARY IS CLOSED ON WEDNESDAY, 26 APRIL, FOR A STAFF EVENT. 

This week's program schedule is heavy in the middle, with a seminar and a pair of public programs. Here are the specifics:

- Tuesday, 25 April, 5:15PM : Anna M. Blankenship of North Dakota State University leads a Modern American Society and Culture seminar, titled "Interreligious Responses to the Settlement House Movement, 1880-1924." This paper analyzes how Catholic and Jewish immigrant communities in New York City responded to the Protestant origins and agenda of their benefactors prior to the 1920s, when many settlement houses secularized activities in order to receive money from the Community Chest. Kristen Petersen of the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences provides comment. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Wednesday, 26 April, 6:00PM : Join us for an author talk with David Waldstreicher and Matthew Mason, author/editors of a recent book titled John Quincy Adams and the Politics of Slavery: Selections from the Diary. Within, the authors offer an unusual perspective on the dramatic and shifting politics of slavery in the early republic. By juxtaposing Adams' personal reflections of slavery with what he said - and did not say - publicly on the issue, the editors offer a nuanced portrait of how he interacted with prevailing ideologies during his consequential career and life. This talk is open to the public and registration is required with a fee of $10 (no charge for MHS Members or Fellows). Pre-talk reception begins at 5:30PM, followed by the program at 6:00PM. 

- Thursday, 27 April, 6:00PM : "Eating Other People's Food" is the second installment of the Cooking Boston series. In this program, Alex Prud'homme, Laura Shapiro, Stephen Chen, and moderator Megan Sniffin-Marinoff discuss Americans' re-introduction to the food of the world in the second half of the 20th century. The expansion of the American palate that began with television chefs like Julia Child in Cambridge continued with restaurants across greater Boston and helped reshape the idea of dinner. This talk is open to the public and registration is required with a fee of $20 (no charge for MHS Members or Fellows). A pre-talk reception starts at 5:30PM, followed by the program at 6:00PM. 

- Saturday, 29 April, 9:00AM : Civil Rights in America is a teacher workshop sponsored by the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University, and is made possible thanks to a grant form the Lincoln and Theresa Filene Foundation. This program is SOLD OUT and registration is closed.

 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 23 April, 2017, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

After you recover from the Marathon why not take in some public progams here at the Society. Here is what is lined up for the week ahead:

The MHS is CLOSED on Monday, 17 April, in observance of Patriots' Day.

- Tuesday, 18 April, 2:00PM : Looking for something to do with the kids during vacation week? Come on in Tuesday at 2:00PM for Make Your Own Comic: The Jamestown Relief Mission to Ireland, a hands-on history program. After hearing from historians about the famine relief mission from Boston to Ireland led by Robert Bennet Forbes aboard the Jamestown, local comic book artists will help the young historians make their own historical comic depicting stories of Irish immigration. This event is open to the public free of charge though registration is required.

- Thursday, 20 April, 9:00AM : Boston to the Rescue: Robert B. Forbes & Irish Famine Relief is a full-day teacher workshop open to K-12 educators and students. Participants will explore the history of earliy Irish immigration to Boston and the tensions divided Catholic immigrants and Protestant New Englanders in the 1830s and 1840s. Registration is required at a cost of $25 (free for students). Please e-mail education@masshist.org or call 617-646-0557 for more information or to register. 

- Thursday, 20 April, 5:30PM : Lauren Meyer of Yale University presents this weeks History of Women and Gender Seminar, "Sadie Alexander, Black Women's Work, and Economic Citizenship during the New Deal Era." This argues that Sadie Alexander, the first black woman to earn a Ph.D. in economics and a successful practicing lawyer, offered an alternative, black feminist definition of economic citizenship that shifted discourses on the relationship between race, gender, labor, and the meaning of citizenship. Martin Summers of Boston College provides comment. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Saturday, 22 April, 10:00AM : The History and Collections of the MHS Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 16 April, 2017, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

There is a flurry of activity to start the week here at the Society before we ease into a long weekend. Here is what we have in store:

- Monday, 10 April, 6:00PM : We begin the week with an author talk featuring Ronald H. Epp, whose recent book is titled Creating Acadia National Park: The Biography of George Bucknam Dorr. In his work, Epp examines the pioneering role of Dorr's seminal contributions - largely unacknowledged - to the American environmental movement. This talk is open to the public and registration is required with a fee of $10 (no charge for MHS Members or Fellows). A pre-talk reception begins at 5:30PM followed by the speaking program at 6:00PM. 

- Tuesday, 11 April, 5:15PM : This weeks Environmental History Seminar is a panel discussion titled "Fishing the Commons." The talk will feature Erik Reardon of University of Maine at Orono and his paper "New England's Pre-Industrial River Commons: Culture and Economy," as well as Stacy Roberts of University of California, Davis, and her essay "The Private Commons: Oyster Planting in 19th-century Connecticut." Matthew McKenzie of University of Connecticut at Avery Point provides comment. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Wednesday, 12 April, 12:00PM : Come in for a Brown Bag talk on Wednesday titled "Radical Enlightenment in the Struggle over Slavery," featuring Matthew Stewart, author of Nature's God: The Heretical Origins of the American Republic. This talk draws material from a work in progress to lead a discussion about the role of Enlightenment ideas in shaping abolitionism, anti-slavery politics, and the Civil War. This talk is free and open to the public so grab your lunch and stop by!

- Wednesday, 12 April, 6:00PM : "The Rise and Fall of the American Party" is a public program that is part of The Irish Atlantic Series which is centered on our current exhibition. In this talk, Stephen T. Riley Librarian of the MHS, Peter Drummey, looks at the meteoric rise of the American Party - the "Know Nothings" - as well as its rapid decline with the approach of the Civil War. This talk is free and open to the public though registration is required. Pre-talk reception kicks-off at 5:30PM and the program starts at 6:00PM. 

- Saturday, 15 April, 10:00AM : The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

Please note that the Society is CLOSED on Monday, 17 April, in observance of Patriot's Day.

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 9 April, 2017, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

It's a pretty quiet week here at the Society as we begin a new month. Here is what lies ahead:

- Tuesday, 4 April, 5:15PM : Agnès Delahaye of the Université Lyon II presents this week's Early American History seminar titled "Promotional Literature and Identity in Colonial Massachusetts." This essay examines the institutional and cultural factors behind promotional literature, the body of colonial sources written for metropolitan audiences. The essay details the tropes and expressions of the commonality of purpose that Delahaye sees in most New England historiography, and explores the relationship between colonial historiography and exceptionalism in the New England tradition. Conrad E. Wright of the MHS provides comment. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Wednesday, 5 April, 12:00PM : Julia Rose Kraut of the Historical Society of the New York Courts leads this week's Brown Bag lunch talk, entitled "A Fear of Foreigners and of Freedom: Ideological Exclusion and Deportation in America." This talk examines the history of the exclusion and deportation of foreigners from the United States based on their beliefs, associations, and/or expressions, from the Alien Act of 1798 to the War on Terror. This talk is free and open to the public.

- Saturday, 8 April, 10:00AM : The History and Collections of the MHS is a 90-minute docent-led walk through the public spaces here at the Society. The tour is free and open to the public with no need for researvations for individuals and small groups. Larger parties (8 or more) should contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley in advance at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity.

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 2 April, 2017, 12:00 AM

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