The Beehive: the official blog of the Massachusetts Historical Society

Beehive series: Today @MHS

This Week @ MHS

The Society is CLOSED on Monday, 16 January, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Here are the events on the schedule this week:

- Wednesday, 18 January, 12:00PM : "The Fight for Women's Equality in the Anti-Slavery Movement, 1833-1840" is a Brown Bag talk with Louis Knight, author of Jane Addams: Spirit in Action. The talk examines ow some early feminist abolitionists sought to integrate women into the American Antislavery Society beginning in 1833 and finally succeeding in 1840, illustrating how these women were inspired by a groundbreaking feminist vision for a genderblind democracy. This talk is free and open to the public. 

- Wednesday, 18 January, 6:00PM : Loom, a new book of poetry by Kevin Gallagher, explores the difficult relations between the northern textile mills and the cotton produced by the southern slave economy. This author talk is open to the public and registration is required with a fee of $10 (no charge for MHS Members or Fellows). There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 with light refreshments, and the program begins at 6:00PM. 

- Thursday, 19 January, 5:30PM : "Publishing Lives: How It's Done, and Who Does It" is part of the New England Biography Seminar series. Deanne Urmy, Senior Executive Editor at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, and Jill Kneerim of the Kneerim & Williams literary agency, both of whom are actively engaged in publishing biography, will be joined by Laura Claridge, author of the just-published The Lady with the Borzoi: Blanche Knopf, Literary Tastemaker Extraordinaire. Their conversation will widen out from biography itself to the workings of the literary marketplace, then and now. The discussion is moderated by Megan Marshall. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Saturday, 21 January, 10:00AM : The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Turning Points in American History.

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 15 January, 2017, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

We're back to business here at the MHS, heading into year 226! Our programs begin in earnest this week with a seminar, a brown bag, and a tour. Here's the rundown:

- Tuesday, 10 January, 5:15PM : The first seminar of the year is part of the Environmental History series and is called "Sex in the Reeds: Disciplining Nature and Cultivating Virtue in the Back Bay Fens." Zachary Nowak of Harvard University presents this essay on "invasive exotic species" as one reason for the removal of reeds planted along the Muddy River, and that label as a social construct, not a biological fact. Improving the Fens through planting and weeding has for more than a century really been a project to improve people. Independent Scholar Phyllis Andersen provides comment. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Wednesday, 11 January, 12:00PM : Stop by at lunch time for a Brown Bag talk with John Garcia of Boston University. "The Early American Bookseller: A Network History" explains how financial records, correspondence, and writing by booksellers can help to reconstruct print networks and geographies of books and reading. Garcia argues that the many instances of economic failure in American bookselling reveal various attempts to connect authors, readers, and publics in the face of geographic and infrastructural obstacles. This talk is free and open to the public. 

- Saturday, 14 January, 10:00AM : The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Turning Points in American History.

 

Please note that the Society is CLOSED on Monday, 16 January, in observance of Martin Luther King Day. Normal hours resume on Tuesday, 17 January. 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Saturday, 7 January, 2017, 1:00 PM

This Week @ MHS

There are no public programs scheduled for this week, but there are a few things to take note of:

- The library closes at 3:30PM on Monday, 19 December, and the building closes at 4:00PM.

- The library is closed from Friday, 23 December, through Monday, 2 January. Normal hours resume on Tuesday, 3 December. 

- Exhbition galleries are open Tuesday, 27 December through Friday, 30 December, 10:00AM-4:00PM. Stop by to check out Turning Points in American History

Please check our online calendar for a full listing of our upcoming closures. 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 18 December, 2016, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

This week is your final chance to take part in some public programs here at the MHS for the year 2016. Please note that the library closes at 3:30PM on Monday, 12 December. Here are the progams ahead:

- Monday, 12 December, 6:00PM : Building Old Cambridge: Architecture and Development, is an author talk with Susan Maycock and Charles Sullivan, centered on their book Building Old Cambridge. In this talk the authors explore Old Cambridge’s architecture and development in the context of its social and economic history; the development of Harvard Square as a commercial center and regional mass transit hub; the creation of parks and open spaces; and the formation of a thriving nineteenth-century community of booksellers, authors, printers, and publishers that made Cambridge a national center of the book industry. This program is open to the public, registration required with a fee of $10 (no charge for MHS Members or Fellows). A pre-talk reception begins at 5:30PM and the talk begins at 6:00PM.

- Tuesday, 13 December, 5:15PM : The final seminar of 2016 is a panel discussion from the Environmental History series. "Recreation and Regional Planning" features Elsa Devienne of the Universite Paris Ouest Nanterre La Defense and Princeton University, and Garret Nelson of Dartmouth College. Brian Donahue of Brandeis University provides comment. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers. 

- Wednesday, 14 December, 6:00PM : Join Tamara Thornton of SUNY Buffalo as she discusses her new book, Nathaniel Bowditch and the Power of Numbers. Fleshing out the multiple careers of Nathaniel Bowditch, this book is at once a lively biography, a window into the birth of bureaucracy, and a portrait of patrician life, giving us a broader, more-nuanced understanding of how powerful capitalists operated during this era and how the emerging quantitative sciences shaped the modern experience. Pre-talk reception begins at 5:30PM and the program starts at 6:00PM. This talk is open to the public free of charge, registration required. 

- Saturday, 17 December, 10:00AM : The History and Collections of the MHS is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Turning Points in American History.

 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 11 December, 2016, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

It's that time, once again, for our weekly round-up of programs to come. Here's what's happening at the Society in the week ahead:

- Monday, 5 December, 6:00PM : Join us for an author talk with Jane Kamensky of Harvard University. A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley is a bold new history that recovers an unknown American Revolution as seen through the eyes of Boston-born painter John Singleton Copley. In her new work, Kamensky untangles the web of principles and interests that shaped the age of America's revolution. This talk is open to the public and registration is required with a fee of $20 (no charge for MHS Members and Fellows). A pre-talk reception begins at 5:30PM, followed by the program at 6:00PM. 

- Tuesday, 6 December, 10:15AM : "Slavery and Freedom in the Cradle of Liberty: An Exhibit of Objects and Documents from the Massachusetts Historical Society" is a virtual exhibit presented by students from Boston University's HI-190, The History of Boston. Their project presents more than 20 rare artifacts and documents from the MHS collection, and explores the contentious and powerful history of nineteenth-century Boston as its residents grappled with questions of slavery, freedom, and civil war. This event is open to the public; registration is required at no cost.

- Tuesday, 6 December, 5:15PM : This week's first seminar, part of the Early American History series, is a panel discussion with Liam Riordan of the University of Maine at Orono and Christina Carrick of Boston University." The discussion, "Loyalism," will focus on Riordan's essay "Revisiting Thomas Hutchinson: The Strengths and Weaknesses of Loyalist Biography," and Carricks' "'The earlier we form good Connections the better': David Greene's Loyalist Merchant Network in the Revolutionary Atlantic." Steve Bullock of Worcester Polytechnic Institute will provide comment. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Wednesday, 7 December, 12:00PM : Stop by at lunch time for a Brown Bag talk with Manisha Sinha of the University of Connecticut. "The Abolitionist Origins of Radical Reconstruction: Charles Sumner, Thaddeus Stevens, and Black Citizenship" examines how Radical Republicans like Sumner and Stevens helped convert a radical social movement into a program for political change. This talk is free and open to the public. 

- Wednesday, 7 December, 6:00PM : MHS Fellows and Members are invited to celebrate the season at the Society's annual MHS Fellows and Members Holiday Party. Enjoy an evening of holiday cheer along with the annual tradition of reading the anti-Christmas laws. Registration is required. 

- Thursday, 8 December, 5:30PM : The second seminar of the week is a part of the History of Women and Gender series and is another panel discussion. "The History of Black Feminisms" is a conversation among Francoise Hamlin of Brown University, Tanisha C. Ford of the University of Delaware, and Treva Lindsey of Ohio State University and the Hutchins Center for African & African America Research. Kali Nicole Gross of Wesleyan University moderates this conversation that encompasses issues of identity, class, and culture and pays tribute to the scholarship of Leslie Brown of Williams College. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 4 December, 2016, 12:00 AM

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