The Beehive: Official Blog of the Massachusetts Historical Society http://www.masshist.org/blog The official blog of the Massachusetts Historical Society, covering MHS events and activities. en-us Fri, 01 May 2009 00:00:00 GMT Mon, 10 Dec 2018 06:00:00 GMT http://www.masshist.org/blog/rss/feed2.0.rss egrublin@masshist.org (Elaine Grublin) webmaster@masshist.org This Week @MHS http://www.masshist.org/blog/1698 <p>Join us for a program at the MHS this week!</p> <p><strong>- Tuesday, 11 December, 12:00 PM:</strong> <em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2734">Robert Treat Paine's Life & Influence on Law</a></em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2734"> </a>with Maura Healey, Massachusetts Attorney General; Alan Rogers, Boston College; Christina Carrick, Assistant Editor, <em>The Papers of Robert Treat Paine, </em>and moderator Catherine Allgor, MHS President. Join us for a special event with the current Attorney General looking at the first Massachusetts Attorney General's life and influence on law and order during the Revolutionary era. This event celebrates the completion of the five-volume series <em>The Papers of Robert Treat Paine. <em>A pre-talk reception begins at 11:30 AM; the speaking program begins at 12:00 PM. This program is free and open to the public.</em></em></p> <p><strong>- Tuesday, 11 December, 5:15 PM: </strong><em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2649">A Nice History of Bird Migration: Ethology, Expertise, & Conservation in 20th Century North America</a></em> with Kristoffer Whitney, Rochester Institute of Technology, and comment by Marilyn Ogilvie, University of Oklahoma.This paper focuses on the historical relationships between migratory birds, scientists, and amateur experts in 20th-century North America, especially Margaret Morse Nice. Nice, simultaneously a trained ornithologist and an enthusiastic amateur across disciplines, almost single-handedly introduced the American ornithological community to European ethology. Her bird-banding work exemplified the tensions in natural history around expertise, gender, and conservation.This is part of the <a href="/2012/calendar/seminars/environmental-history">Boston Seminar on Environmental History</a> series.<em> Seminars are free and open to the public.</em></p> <p><strong>- Wednesday, 12 December, 12:00 PM: </strong><em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2694">Ecology of Utopia: Environmental Discourse and Practice in Antebellum Communal Settlements</a></em> with Molly Reed, Cornell University. During the 1840s, members of short-lived intentional communities debated strategies for "getting back to nature" and explored emerging meanings of "natural" through radical hygiene, diet, and agricultural practices. This talk examines how Transcendentalist and Fourierist communitarians articulated human-environment relationships in terms that reflected and informed their visions for social change.This is part of the <a href="/research/brown-bags">brown-bag lunch</a> program.</p> <p><strong>- Wednesday, 12 December, 6:00 PM: </strong> <em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2612">No More, America</a></em> with Peter Galison, Harvard University; Henry Louis Gates Jr., Harvard University. In 1773, two graduating Harvard seniors, Theodore Parsons and Eliphalet Pearson, were summoned before a public audience to debate whether slavery was compatible with "natural law." Peter Galison's short film, "No More, America" co-directed with Henry Louis Gates, reimagines this original debate to include the powerful voice of Phillis Wheatley, an acclaimed poet, then-enslaved, who lived just across the Charles River from the two Harvard students. Join us for a film screening followed by a discussion between Peter Galison and Henry Louis Gates. <em>A pre-program reception begins at 5:30 PM; the speaking program begins at 6:00 PM. There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).</em><em> </em></p> <p><strong>- Saturday, 15 December, 10:00 AM:</strong> <em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2622">The History & Collections of the MHS</a></em>. Join is for a 90-minute docent-led walk through of the public rooms of the MHS. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or <a href="mailto:abentley@masshist.org">abentley@masshist.org</a>.</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.masshist.org/calendar/event?event=2484">Fashioning the New England Family</a></em> is open Monday through Friday, from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM. The exhibition explores the ways in which the multiple meanings of fashion and fashionable goods are reflected in patterns of consumption and refashioning, recycling, and retaining favorite family pieces. Many of the items that will be featured have been out of sight, having never been exhibited for the public or seen in living memory. The exhibition is organized as part of <a href="https://www.massfashion.org/">Mass Fashion</a>, a consortium of cultural institutions set up to explore and celebrate the many facets of the culture of fashion in Massachusetts. </p> <p>Please note that the library will <strong>open at 2:00 PM on Tuesday, 11 December</strong> and will <strong>close at 3:30 PM on Thursday, 13 December</strong>. <span style="font-size: 14px;">Take a look at our </span><a style="font-size: 14px;" href="http://www.masshist.org/events">calendar</a><span style="font-size: 14px;"> page for information about upcoming programs.</span></p> Mon, 10 Dec 2018 06:00:00 GMT @MHS http://www.masshist.org/blog/1698 Barbara Hillard Smith’s Diary, December 1918 http://www.masshist.org/blog/1701 <p>Today we return to the 1918 diary of Newton teenager Barbara Hillard Smith. You may read our introduction to the diary, and Barbara's previous entries, here:</p> <p><a href="http://www.masshist.org/blog/1581">January</a> | <a href="http://www.masshist.org/blog/1588">February</a> | <a href="http://www.masshist.org/blog/post.php?entry_id=1594">March</a> | <a href="http://www.masshist.org/blog/1611">April</a> | <a href="http://www.masshist.org/blog/1619">May</a> | <a style="font-size: 14px;" href="http://www.masshist.org/blog/1636">June</a><span style="font-size: 14px;"> | </span><a style="font-size: 14px;" href="http://www.masshist.org/blog/1644">July</a><span style="font-size: 14px;"> | </span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><a style="font-size: 14px;" href="http://www.masshist.org/blog/1654">August</a><span style="font-size: 14px;"> | </span><a style="font-size: 14px;" href="http://www.masshist.org/blog/1666">Septembe</a><span style="font-size: 14px;">r | </span><a style="font-size: 14px;" href="http://www.masshist.org/blog/post.php?entry_id=1674">October</a> | <a href="http://www.masshist.org/blog/1694">November</a></p> <p>As regular readers of the Beehive know, we are following Barbara throughout 1918 with monthly blog posts that present Barbara's daily life -- going to school, seeing friends, playing basketball, and caring for family members -- in the words she wrote a century ago.</p> <p>This post is the final in our year-long series sharing Barbara's diary. The series will return in January 2019 with a new narrator hailing from the year 1919. In the meantime, take a moment or two to learn about Barbara's December--full of basketball, babies, and a trip to New York to visit her friend Babe. Read along and--as Barbara says in her final entry for the year--"Watched old year out."</p> <p>Here is Barbara's December, day by day.</p> <p>* * *</p> <p>SUN. 1 DECEMBER<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Church. Sunday S. Dr. Drew here. Over to Aunt Mabels for supper.</span></p> <p>MON. 2<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">School. Babies</span></p> <p>TUES. 3<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">School. Studied. Cousin Bert took us to Westminster and saw "</span><a style="font-size: 14px;" href="https://www.ibdb.com/broadway-production/fiddlers-three-8732">Fiddler's three</a><span style="font-size: 14px;">"</span></p> <p>WED. 4<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">School. Babies. Pastor's Reception</span></p> <p>THUR. 5<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">School. Swimming. Shampoo</span></p> <p>FRI. 6<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">School. Awful snow storm. Mrs. Reed</span></p> <p>SAT. 7<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Worked around Mrs. Reed's. K-C for week end with Pete.</span></p> <p>SUN. 8<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Church Sunday School. Supper at Lasell.</span></p> <p>MON. 9<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">School. In town. Got suit</span></p> <p>TUES. 10<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">School. Basket Ball Starter. Fitting for suit</span></p> <p>WED. 11<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Got sick in school. Went to babies</span></p> <p>THUR. 12<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Home sick</span></p> <p>FRI. 13<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">School. Dance with Spud</span></p> <p>SAT. 14<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Hung around. Christmas play at Seminary.</span></p> <p>SUN. 15<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Sunday School. Lasell Christmas Vespers</span></p> <p>MON. 16<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">School. Took care of baby</span></p> <p>TUES. 17<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">School. Basketball. Cousin Bert here.</span></p> <p>WED. 18<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">School. Took care of baby. Mr. Reed home from operation</span></p> <p>THURS. 19<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">School. Basketball.</span></p> <p>FRI. 20<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">School. Babies</span></p> <p>SAT. 21<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Took care of sonny. [Havene] for weekend. Christmas party. Freddie's show</span></p> <p>SUN. 22<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Church. Sunday School. Concert. C. Endeavor. Spud's for supper.</span></p> <p>MON. 23<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">In town. Took care of baby. Women's club concert</span></p> <p>TUES. 24<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Up to Reed's all day. Trained, so didn't have caroling. Sick</span></p> <p>WED. 25 CHRISTMAS DAY<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Had presents. Dance at Spud's</span></p> <p>THUR. 26<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Went to New York to visit Babe. Met </span><a style="font-size: 14px;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Palmer">Jack Palmer</a><span style="font-size: 14px;">.</span></p> <p>FRI. 27<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Went to Mrs. Learnerd's for lunch. Keith's in afternoon.</span></p> <p>SAT. 28<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Babe's singing lessons. Went to </span><a style="font-size: 14px;" href="https://www.ibdb.com/broadway-production/ladies-first-8787">Ladies First</a></p> <p>SUN. 29<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Company for dinner. Out for walk. Reg + Gladys came over.</span></p> <p>MON. 30<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Went to movies.</span></p> <p>TUES. 31<br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">John Ross. Went to Mrs Andrew's with Jack. Watched old year out</span></p> <p>If you are interested in viewing the diary in person in our library or have other questions about the collection, please <a href="http://www.masshist.org/library/visit">visit the library</a> or <a href="http://www.masshist.org/library/reference">contact</a> a member of the library staff for further assistance.</p> <p><em>*Please note that the diary transcription is a rough-and-ready version, not an authoritative transcript. Researchers wishing to use the diary in the course of their own work should verify the version found here with the manuscript original. The catalog record for the Barbara Hillard Smith collection </em><a href="http://balthazaar.masshist.org/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?DB=local&BBID=148706"><em>may be found here</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p> </p> Fri, 07 Dec 2018 06:00:00 GMT Lindsay Bina, Intern and Anna Clutterbuck-Cook, Reader Services http://www.masshist.org/blog/1701 Remembering Former President George H. W. Bush http://www.masshist.org/blog/1700 <p>As the United States remembers former President George H. W. Bush, who died on Friday, 30 November 2018, at the age of 94, the MHS remembers him too.</p> <blockquote> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="/imhs/cms/assets/cms1/7299_bush_trans_workmed.jpg" alt="" width="400" height="589" /><br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">George H. W. Bush addressing guests at the MHS Annual Dinner on 10 October 2002.</span></p> </blockquote> <p>In 2002, MHS staff (and items from the collections!) had two notable encounters with George H. W. Bush. On 11 March 2002, the exhibition <em>Fathers and Sons</em> opened at the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum on the grounds of Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas. The exhibition focused on the private and public careers of the two father and son sets of presidents: John Adams and John Quincy Adams and George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush. Staff from both the Bush Library and the MHS worked from September 2001 to January 2002 on establishing and finalizing which items from the Adams Family Papers and other collections would be on display in Texas. All in all, the Bush Library borrowed 26 manuscripts, 5 printed texts, 2 engravings, and 8 artifacts from the MHS for the exhibition. William M. Fowler, Jr., Director of the MHS (in 2002), joined George H. W. Bush, and his wife, Barbara, and many guests at the official opening of the show.</p> <blockquote> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/imhs/cms/assets/cms1/bushlibrary1adj-med.jpg" alt="" width="400" height="317" /><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">William M. Fowler, Jr., George H. W. Bush, and Patricia Burchfield examine Adams family artifacts from the MHS on display at the George Bush Presidential Library in March 2002. </span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/imhs/cms/assets/cms1/bushlibrary3adj-med.jpg" alt="" width="400" height="352" /><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">William M. Fowler, Jr. with George H. W. Bush and Barbara Bush in March 2002.</span></p> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-size: 14px;">About seven months later, Mr. Bush travelled to Boston, Mass. and spoke at the MHS Annual Dinner held at the Harvard Club on 10 October 2002. Not since John Quincy Adams addressed the members in 1841 had a president spoken to the MHS. Before the well-attended formal dinner, Mr. Bush visited the MHS. David McCullough, the well-known historian and author of the book, </span><em style="font-size: 14px;">John Adams</em><span style="font-size: 14px;">, and MHS Stephen T. Riley Librarian, Peter Drummey, shared information about selected items from MHS's collections, including the manuscript of George Washington's Newburgh Address, Thomas Jefferson's Farm Book, and Paul Revere's account of his famous ride to Lexington. </span></p> <blockquote> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="vertical-align: middle; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/imhs/cms/assets/cms1/7300_bush_neg_workmed.jpg" alt="" width="400" height="427" /><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">George H. W. Bush examining documents from the collection of the MHS with David McCullough (right) and Peter Drummey (left).</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="/imhs/cms/assets/cms1/7301_bush_workmed.jpg" alt="" width="400" height="406" /><br /><span style="font-size: 14px;">From left to right: Amalie M. Kass (MHS President in 2002), David McCullough, George H. W. Bush, Levin H. Campbell, and William M. Fowler, Jr. (MHS </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">Director in 2002).</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"> </p> </blockquote> Wed, 05 Dec 2018 06:00:00 GMT MHS http://www.masshist.org/blog/1700 This Week @MHS http://www.masshist.org/blog/1697 <p>Here is a look at what is going on this week at the MHS:</p> <p><strong>- Monday, 3 December, 6:00 PM: </strong> <em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2693">Rochambeau: The French Military Presence in Boston</a></em> with Robert Selig, The Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail. In July 1780, the French troop transport <em>le de France</em> sailed into Boston Harbor. Thus began 30 months of uninterrupted French military presence in Boston as the city became the most important French base in North America until Christmas Day 1782, when a fleet under Admiral Vaudreuil sailed from Boston for the West Indies carrying the comte de Rochambeau's infantry. This talk provides an in-depth look at this little-known episode in Massachusetts and Boston history. <em>A pre-talk reception begins at 5:30 PM; the speaking program begins at 6:00 PM. There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).</em><em> </em></p> <p><em> </em><strong style="font-size: 14px;">- Tuesday, 4 December, 5:15 PM: </strong><span style="font-size: 14px;"><em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2661">"Attend to the Opium": Boston's Trade with China in the Early 19th Century</a> with </em></span><span style="font-size: 14px;">Gwenn Miller, College of the Holy Cross, and comment by Dael Norwood, University of Delaware. </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">The opium trade is the nefarious flip-side of the opulence of the American China trade. The involvement of so many Boston families in this trade would contribute to the growth of the city and its institutions by the end of the nineteenth century. Homes decorated with Chinese art, porcelains, silks, and meticulously curated gardens were made possible by profits initially rooted in the fur trade, and in large part sustained by opium.</span><span style="font-size: 14px;">This is part of the </span><a style="font-size: 14px;" href="/2012/calendar/seminars/early-american-history">Boston Area Seminar on Early American History</a><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">series.</span><em style="font-size: 14px;"> Seminars are free and open to the public.</em></p> <p><strong>- Wednesday, 5 December, 12:00 PM: </strong><span style="font-size: 14px;"><em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2635">Seas of Connection: Narratives of Migration through Local American Wards</a></em> with Nicholas Ames, University of Notre Dame. </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">Mass emigration during the 19th and early 20th centuries produced rapidly shifting cityscapes across America. This talk investigates changes at the neighborhood (ward) level in three industrial American communities, Pittsburgh, PA, Cleveland, OH, and Clinton, MA, to understand the impact of historic Irish immigrants on community development within "quintessential" America. This is part of the <a href="/research/brown-bags">brown-bag lunch</a> program. Brown-bags are free and open to the public.</span></p> <p><strong>- Wednesday, 5 December, 6:00 PM: </strong><em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2705">MHS Fellows & Members Holiday Party</a></em>. <span style="font-size: 14px;">MHS Fellows and Members are invited to the Society's annual holiday party. Please note that the event is <strong>SOLD OUT</strong>.</span></p> <p><strong>- Thursday, 6 December, 6:00 PM: </strong><em><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"><a href="/calendar/event?event=2725">Boston in the Great War: Manuscripts & Artifacts of World War I</a></span></em><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center; font-family: Arial;"> with f</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">acilitator Bruce J. Schulman, Boston University. </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">Prof. Bruce Schulman and students from Boston University will present a collection of artifacts and documents from the holdings of the MHS. From printed propaganda and personal recollections to battle plans and victory gardens, this presentation and virtual exhibit will explore the many ways in which Bostonians were affected by the Great War. </span><em><span style="font-size: 14px;">Light refreshments will be served after the presentation. This program is free and open to the public.</span></em></p> <p><strong>- Friday, 7 December, 12:00 PM: </strong><span style="font-size: 14px;"><em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2758">Sylvia Plath's Letters & Traces</a> with Peter K. Steinberg, Co-Editor of the two-volume edition of </em></span><em style="font-size: 14px;">The Letters of Sylvia Plath. </em><span style="font-size: 14px;">In this talk, Peter K. Steinberg will discuss his role in editing the two-volume </span><em style="font-size: 14px;">Letters of Sylvia Plath</em><span style="font-size: 14px;">, published recently by HarperCollins. He will also highlight the professional and personal responses to Plath in her lifetime, as well as share an archival discovery made on a piece of carbon typing paper. This is part of the <a href="/research/brown-bags">brown-bag lunch</a> program.</span></p> <p><strong>- Saturday, 8 December, 10:00 AM:</strong> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2621">The History & Collections of the MHS</a></em>. Join is for</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> a 90-minute docent-led walk through of the public rooms of the MHS. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or <a href="mailto:abentley@masshist.org">abentley@masshist.org</a>.</span></p> <p><em><a href="http://www.masshist.org/calendar/event?event=2484">Fashioning the New England Family</a></em> is open Monday through Friday, from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM. The exhibition explores the ways in which the multiple meanings of fashion and fashionable goods are reflected in patterns of consumption and refashioning, recycling, and retaining favorite family pieces. Many of the items that will be featured have been out of sight, having never been exhibited for the public or seen in living memory. The exhibition is organized as part of <a href="https://www.massfashion.org/">Mass Fashion</a>, a consortium of cultural institutions set up to explore and celebrate the many facets of the culture of fashion in Massachusetts. </p> <p>Take a look at our <a href="http://www.masshist.org/events">calendar</a> page for information about upcoming programs.</p> Mon, 03 Dec 2018 06:00:00 GMT @MHS http://www.masshist.org/blog/1697 This Week @MHS http://www.masshist.org/blog/1696 <p>Here is a look at what is going on this week at the MHS:</p> <p><strong>- Tuesday, 27 November, 5:15 PM: </strong><em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2638">In Search of the Costs of Segregation</a></em> with Elizabeth Herbin-Triant, University of Massachusetts--;Lowell, and comment by Kenneth W. Mack, Harvard Law School. Historians generally treat Jim Crow as a legal, political, and cultural system shaping where African Americans went, whether they voted, and how they acted. Yet it was also an economic system that imposed financial burdens. This paper explores how segregation made the activities undertaken by African Americans--;from gaining education to property--;more expensive for them and how it excluded them from economic advancement. This is part of the <a href="/2012/calendar/seminars/modern-american">Boston Seminar on Modern American Society and Culture</a> series.<em> Seminars are free and open to the public.</em></p> <p><strong>- Wednesday, 28 November, 12:00 PM: </strong><span style="font-size: 14px;"><em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2745">Mules, Fuels, & Fusion: Overcoming Entropy & Crossing the Isthmian Transit Zone 1848-1977</a> </em>with Jordan Coulombe, University of New Hampshire. </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">This talk explores American attempts to construct transportation infrastructures in Panama between the creation of the Panama Railroad and the Carter-Torrijos Treaties. It focuses specifically on the role proliferating energy sources played in restructuring the Isthmian environment.</span></p> <p><strong><span style="font-size: 14px;">- Thursday, 29 November, 6:00 PM: </span></strong><span style="font-size: 14px;"><em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2611">After Emily: Two Remarkable Women & the Legacy of America's Greatest Poet</a></em> with Julie Dobrow, Tufts University. </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">Despite Emily Dickinson's world renown, the story of the two women most responsible </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">for her initial posthumous publication--;Mabel Loomis Todd and her daughter, Millicent Todd Bingham--;has remained in the shadows of the archives. A rich and compelling portrait of women who refused to be confined by the social mores of their era, <em>After Emily</em> explores Mabel and Millicent's complex bond, as well as the powerful literary legacy they shared. </span><em style="font-size: 14px;">A pre-talk reception begins at 5:30 PM; the speaking program begins at 6:00 PM. There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders)</em><em style="font-size: 14px;"> </em></p> <p><strong>- Friday, 30 November, 12:00 PM: </strong><span style="font-size: 14px;"><em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2695">The American Debates over the China Relief Expedition of 1900</a> </em>with Xiangyun Xu, Pennsylvania State University<em>. </em></span><span style="font-size: 14px;">This talk examines the American debates over the country's participation in the eight-nation alliance to relieve the Chinese Boxers' siege of internationals in Tianjin and Beijing. It places U.S. participation within the context of concurrent controversies over the Spanish-American and Philippine-American war as well as the assertive U.S. policy in East Asia.</span></p> <p><strong>- Friday, 30 November, 2:00 PM: </strong><span style="font-size: 14px;"><em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2613">Fashioning the New England Family Gallery Talk</a></em> with Kimberly Alexander, University of New Hampshire. </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">Material culture specialist and guest curator, Dr. Kimberly Alexander will help viewers explore and contextualize rarely seen costumes, textiles and fashion-related accessories mined from the MHS collection. Representing three- centuries of evolving New England style, most of the pieces have never before been on view to the public.</span></p> <p><strong>- Saturday, 1 December, 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM:</strong> <em><a href="/calendar/event?event=2696">Remembering Abigail Adams</a> </em>workshop. Abigail Adams lived at the heart of American politics for nearly half a century. She was a revolutionary First Lady, urging her husband to "Remember the Ladies" in the colonial quest for independence, and a huge influence on the nation's sixth president, John Quincy Adams. In her letters to her family and a wide circle of influential colleagues, Abigail was candid and colorful in depicting the hard work and great reward of nation-building. Join us as we remember the life and legacy of Abigail Adams, one of the many women who helped build early America.<em> This program is open to all who work with K-12 students. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee). <em>There is a $25 per person fee. </em>For questions, contact Kate Melchior at <a href="mailto:education@masshist.org">education@masshist.org</a> or 617-646-0588.</em></p> <p><em><a href="http://www.masshist.org/calendar/event?event=2484">Fashioning the New England Family</a></em> is open Monday through Friday, from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM. The exhibition explores the ways in which the multiple meanings of fashion and fashionable goods are reflected in patterns of consumption and refashioning, recycling, and retaining favorite family pieces. Many of the items that will be featured have been out of sight, having never been exhibited for the public or seen in living memory. The exhibition is organized as part of <a href="https://www.massfashion.org/">Mass Fashion</a>, a consortium of cultural institutions set up to explore and celebrate the many facets of the culture of fashion in Massachusetts. </p> <p>Take a look at our <a href="http://www.masshist.org/events">calendar </a>page for information about upcoming programs.</p> Mon, 26 Nov 2018 06:00:00 GMT @MHS http://www.masshist.org/blog/1696