Public Programs and Special Events

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

Details

The MHS offers many engaging programs and special events.

November

Public Program The Rising at Roxbury Crossing: Boston 1919 5 November 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm James Redfearn In this fascinating fictional tale Willie Dwyer, an Irish immigrant and Boston patrolman, struggles ...

In this fascinating fictional tale Willie Dwyer, an Irish immigrant and Boston patrolman, struggles with his conscience after being caught up in the violence of his native land’s rebellion. The Rising at Roxbury Crossing features a hard and gritty look at post-World War I Boston when she was burdened with high unemployment, radical anarchists, and labor unrest. Escaped political prisoner, Eamon de Valera campaigns for financial assistance for Ireland’s revolutionary government as the city’s police prepare to strike for fair pay and better working conditions. It is 1919, and just as Boston’s Irish patrolman strike and the city erupts into riots and chaos, Willie’s nemesis crosses the Atlantic to track him down. Willie Dwyer must decide whether to run from his past or confront his future.

Jim Redfearn was raised in Boston’s Mission Hill neighborhood and is a former Massachusetts State Trooper, an investigator for a prominent Boston law firm, and an industrial photographer. He earned a graduate degree in writing from Harvard University at the age of fifty-nine. His short fiction has been published by the University’s Charles River Review and the New England Writer’s Network. Among his many appearances, Jim has participated in several authors’ panels, including last year’s panel at Harvard University, moderated by Pulitzer Prize winner, Paul Harding. He has lectured in the Moses Greeley Parker Lecture Series, at the Irish Cultural Center of New England and the Union Club of Boston. Visit www.TheRisingAtRoxburyCrossing.com to learn more about Jim or his novel.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or click here to register.

details
Cocktails with Clio 2014 Special Event Cocktails with Clio 7 November 2014.Friday, 6:00PM - 9:00PM The fifth annual Cocktails with Clio will take place on 7 November 2014. Named for the muse of ...

The fifth annual Cocktails with Clio will take place on 7 November 2014. Named for the muse of history, this festive evening celebrates American history and the 223-year-old mission of the Society. Following an elegant cocktail buffet at the Society’s building, guests will proceed to the nearby Harvard Club for dessert and a conversation with historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Hackett FIscher.

Purchase tickets (tickets cost $250 per person). All net proceeds from the event will support the Society's outreach efforts.


Become a sponsor of Cocktails with Clio

Our sponsors are crucial to the success of the event. As a result of their generosity, the Society’s outreach efforts have expanded. The additional funding has an important impact on our programming, and this year we hope to surpass last year’s goal in order to further enhance our exhibitions, public programs, and education initiatives. 

We are proud to offer individual sponsorship opportunities at the following levels:
$5,000 - Clio’s Circle
$2,500 - Patrons of the Muse
$1,000 - Friends of the Muse   

For more information about becoming a sponsor, please contact Carol Knauff at cknauff@masshist.org or 617-646-0554.

details
Public Program Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England 14 November 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Corin Hirsch Colonial New England was awash in ales, beers, wines, cider and spirits. Everyone from teenage ...

Colonial New England was awash in ales, beers, wines, cider and spirits. Everyone from teenage farmworkers to our founding fathers imbibed heartily and often. Tipples at breakfast, lunch, teatime and dinner were the norm, and low-alcohol hard cider was sometimes even a part of children’s lives. This burgeoning cocktail culture reflected the New World’s abundance of raw materials: apples, sugar and molasses, wild berries and hops. This plentiful drinking sustained a slew of smoky taverns and inns—watering holes that became vital meeting places and the nexuses of unrest as the Revolution brewed. New England food and drinks writer Corin Hirsch explores the origins and taste of the favorite potations of early Americans and offers some modern-day recipes to revive them today.

Corin Hirsch is an award-winning food and drinks writer at Seven Days, the alt-weekly in Burlington, Vermont. She learned to pull a pint of Schlitz (for her grandfather) at the age of six, and she used to tend bar inside a sixteenth-century English pub. She has written about craft beer for Serious Eats and also ghost-blogs and writes in the wine world. This is her first book.

details
Public Program The Better Angels with John Stauffer 16 November 2014.Sunday, 3:00PM - 5:00PM Event at Landmark Theaters Kendall Square (355 Binney Street, One Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA 02139) Commentary and discussion by John Stauffer following film Special screening of The Better Angels, a film about Abraham Lincoln's childhood followed ...

The Better AngelsSpecial screening of The Better Angels, a film about Abraham Lincoln's childhood followed by a discussion led by Professor John Stauffer of Harvard University. 

This is a story of the youth of one of America’s greatest heroes, Abraham Lincoln. Spanning nearly three years in the wilderness of Indiana, it tells of the hardships that shaped him, the tragedy that marked him forever and the two women who guided him to immortality.

Tom Lincoln leads his wife and children, Sally and Abe from Kentucky to the new state of Indiana. Abe, 10, is a quiet boy; gentle and intelligent. He knows happiness for a time until his mother is infected and dies from a mysterious illness. Abe, Sally and their cousin Dennis are left under the care of Tom, a callous disciplinarian.

When Tom leaves to find a new wife, the children are abandoned in the wilderness during a harsh winter. Abe must protect his siblings from wild animals, cold and hunger. Weeks pass before Tom’s return. He brings a new mother, Sarah. Having pledged his love solely to his late mother, Abe resists Sarah as she strives to win him over.

Recognizing Abe’s insatiable appetite for knowledge, Sarah takes up the challenge of schooling him and raising him as if he was her own. Sarah proves unyielding in her tenderness, love and devotion to Abe and his family. He learns to accept her, seeing that, in her he has regained his lost mother and a loving parent who inspires him forever. This understanding frees him to journey onward to the destiny that awaits him. He would later in life call her his “angel mother.”

details
Public Program Decoding Roger Williams: The Lost Essay of Rhode Island's Founding Father 17 November 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Linford D. Fisher, Brown University and J. Stanley Lemons, Rhode Island College In the margins of a curious seventeenth century book at the John Carter Brown Library is a ...

In the margins of a curious seventeenth century book at the John Carter Brown Library is a mysterious handwritten code, long suspected to be the work of Roger Williams, the seventeenth century theologian and founder of Rhode Island. In the spring of 2012, an interdisciplinary team of undergraduates, with support from faculty members, was able to crack this code, revealing a brand new essay by Roger Williams. Come peer into the mind of Roger Williams through the presentations by Linford D. Fisher (Brown University) and J. Stanley Lemons (Rhode Island College), who will discuss what this new essay tells us about Williams. Copies of their new book, Decoding Roger Williams (2014), co-authored with Lucas Mason-Brown, will also be available for purchase.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or click here to register.

details
December
Cogswell snow scene Member Event, Special Event MHS Fellows and Members Holiday Party 3 December 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Please RSVP   This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members. MHS Fellows and Members are invited to celebrate the season at the Society’s annual ...

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to celebrate the season at the Society’s annual holiday party. Enjoy festive music, holiday cheer, and the annual tradition of reading the anti-Christmas laws.

Become a Member today!

details
Public Program Making History: King Philip's War in Documents & Artifacts 8 December 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Facilitator: Bruce J. Schulman, Boston University Students of the Boston University course "Making History" discuss the MHS exhibit on King Philip's ...

Students of the Boston University course "Making History" discuss the MHS exhibit on King Philip's War they have researched and compiled. The semester-long project on the bloody conflict between English colonists and Native Americans includes work on letters and diaries, sermons, early printed books, and objects from the war.

Bruce J. Schulman is the William E. Huntington Professor and Chair of the History Department at Boston University. His teaching and research concentrate on the history of the modern United States, particularly on the relationships between politics and broader cultural change. Schulman is currently at work on a volume for the Oxford History of the United States covering the years 1896-1929. He lives with his family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Image: Bowl attributed to the Wampanoag. Elm burl, 1655-1675. Massachusetts Historical Society .

details
Public Program Race to the Top of the World: Richard Byrd & the First Flight to the North Pole 11 December 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Sheldon Bart One hundred years ago—then as now—the eyes of the industrialized world were on the ...

Race to the Top of the World book coverOne hundred years ago—then as now—the eyes of the industrialized world were on the Arctic. It was widely held in this era that a new, uncharted continent would be found in the Arctic Ocean. Scientific treatises “proved” its existence. As aviation developed, the mythical land became endowed with commercial value and strategic importance. This was the context in which Richard Byrd (1888-1957) emerged as an explorer—an international quest for a mythic grail. His rivals included Roald Amundsen, Lincoln Ellsworth, and Hubert Wilkins.

The Arctic was considered as remote as outer space in the 1920s, and aerial exploits north of the Arctic Circle attracted a tremendous amount of attention. The New York Times called the race “the greatest story of the year.” The sensationalism, however, has never ended. Byrd’s flight to the North Pole has been bitterly disputed for the better part of a century, and almost every part of his early life and career has become controversial. Author Sheldon Bart offers compelling new evidence and new revelations to substantiate his thesis that the controversies still swirling around Admiral Byrd—including the legitimacy of his flight to the North Pole—are based on incomplete research, distortion, and superficial assessment.

Writer-explorer Sheldon Bart is a member of the Board of Governors of the American Polar Society and president and founder of Wilderness Research Foundation (WRF), a not-for-profit organization seeking to create more opportunities for scientific exploration beyond the limited regime of government funding. He organized and led the 1996 American Expedition to Baffin Island in the Canadian Eastern Arctic and was project manager of the 2010 WRF Antarctic Peninsula field program. Sheldon has lectured at the National Archives, the Explorers Club, the Virginia Historical Society, the National Museum of the U.S. Navy, the Geographical Society of Philadelphia, the Elisha Kent Kane Historical Society, Hunter College of the City University of New York, and the Byrd Polar Research Center at Ohio State University. He is a senior associate at LAPA Fundraising, a consulting firm based in New York City, and has published fiction and nonfiction. He is currently working on a novel based on his own polar adventures.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

details
More events
Public Program The Rising at Roxbury Crossing: Boston 1919 5 November 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm James Redfearn

In this fascinating fictional tale Willie Dwyer, an Irish immigrant and Boston patrolman, struggles with his conscience after being caught up in the violence of his native land’s rebellion. The Rising at Roxbury Crossing features a hard and gritty look at post-World War I Boston when she was burdened with high unemployment, radical anarchists, and labor unrest. Escaped political prisoner, Eamon de Valera campaigns for financial assistance for Ireland’s revolutionary government as the city’s police prepare to strike for fair pay and better working conditions. It is 1919, and just as Boston’s Irish patrolman strike and the city erupts into riots and chaos, Willie’s nemesis crosses the Atlantic to track him down. Willie Dwyer must decide whether to run from his past or confront his future.

Jim Redfearn was raised in Boston’s Mission Hill neighborhood and is a former Massachusetts State Trooper, an investigator for a prominent Boston law firm, and an industrial photographer. He earned a graduate degree in writing from Harvard University at the age of fifty-nine. His short fiction has been published by the University’s Charles River Review and the New England Writer’s Network. Among his many appearances, Jim has participated in several authors’ panels, including last year’s panel at Harvard University, moderated by Pulitzer Prize winner, Paul Harding. He has lectured in the Moses Greeley Parker Lecture Series, at the Irish Cultural Center of New England and the Union Club of Boston. Visit www.TheRisingAtRoxburyCrossing.com to learn more about Jim or his novel.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or click here to register.

close
Special Event Cocktails with Clio 7 November 2014.Friday, 6:00PM - 9:00PM registration required Cocktails with Clio 2014

The fifth annual Cocktails with Clio will take place on 7 November 2014. Named for the muse of history, this festive evening celebrates American history and the 223-year-old mission of the Society. Following an elegant cocktail buffet at the Society’s building, guests will proceed to the nearby Harvard Club for dessert and a conversation with historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Hackett FIscher.

Purchase tickets (tickets cost $250 per person). All net proceeds from the event will support the Society's outreach efforts.


Become a sponsor of Cocktails with Clio

Our sponsors are crucial to the success of the event. As a result of their generosity, the Society’s outreach efforts have expanded. The additional funding has an important impact on our programming, and this year we hope to surpass last year’s goal in order to further enhance our exhibitions, public programs, and education initiatives. 

We are proud to offer individual sponsorship opportunities at the following levels:
$5,000 - Clio’s Circle
$2,500 - Patrons of the Muse
$1,000 - Friends of the Muse   

For more information about becoming a sponsor, please contact Carol Knauff at cknauff@masshist.org or 617-646-0554.

close
Public Program Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England 14 November 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Corin Hirsch

Colonial New England was awash in ales, beers, wines, cider and spirits. Everyone from teenage farmworkers to our founding fathers imbibed heartily and often. Tipples at breakfast, lunch, teatime and dinner were the norm, and low-alcohol hard cider was sometimes even a part of children’s lives. This burgeoning cocktail culture reflected the New World’s abundance of raw materials: apples, sugar and molasses, wild berries and hops. This plentiful drinking sustained a slew of smoky taverns and inns—watering holes that became vital meeting places and the nexuses of unrest as the Revolution brewed. New England food and drinks writer Corin Hirsch explores the origins and taste of the favorite potations of early Americans and offers some modern-day recipes to revive them today.

Corin Hirsch is an award-winning food and drinks writer at Seven Days, the alt-weekly in Burlington, Vermont. She learned to pull a pint of Schlitz (for her grandfather) at the age of six, and she used to tend bar inside a sixteenth-century English pub. She has written about craft beer for Serious Eats and also ghost-blogs and writes in the wine world. This is her first book.

close
Public Program The Better Angels with John Stauffer 16 November 2014.Sunday, 3:00PM - 5:00PM Event at Landmark Theaters Kendall Square (355 Binney Street, One Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA 02139) Commentary and discussion by John Stauffer following film

The Better AngelsSpecial screening of The Better Angels, a film about Abraham Lincoln's childhood followed by a discussion led by Professor John Stauffer of Harvard University. 

This is a story of the youth of one of America’s greatest heroes, Abraham Lincoln. Spanning nearly three years in the wilderness of Indiana, it tells of the hardships that shaped him, the tragedy that marked him forever and the two women who guided him to immortality.

Tom Lincoln leads his wife and children, Sally and Abe from Kentucky to the new state of Indiana. Abe, 10, is a quiet boy; gentle and intelligent. He knows happiness for a time until his mother is infected and dies from a mysterious illness. Abe, Sally and their cousin Dennis are left under the care of Tom, a callous disciplinarian.

When Tom leaves to find a new wife, the children are abandoned in the wilderness during a harsh winter. Abe must protect his siblings from wild animals, cold and hunger. Weeks pass before Tom’s return. He brings a new mother, Sarah. Having pledged his love solely to his late mother, Abe resists Sarah as she strives to win him over.

Recognizing Abe’s insatiable appetite for knowledge, Sarah takes up the challenge of schooling him and raising him as if he was her own. Sarah proves unyielding in her tenderness, love and devotion to Abe and his family. He learns to accept her, seeing that, in her he has regained his lost mother and a loving parent who inspires him forever. This understanding frees him to journey onward to the destiny that awaits him. He would later in life call her his “angel mother.”

close
Public Program Decoding Roger Williams: The Lost Essay of Rhode Island's Founding Father 17 November 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Linford D. Fisher, Brown University and J. Stanley Lemons, Rhode Island College

In the margins of a curious seventeenth century book at the John Carter Brown Library is a mysterious handwritten code, long suspected to be the work of Roger Williams, the seventeenth century theologian and founder of Rhode Island. In the spring of 2012, an interdisciplinary team of undergraduates, with support from faculty members, was able to crack this code, revealing a brand new essay by Roger Williams. Come peer into the mind of Roger Williams through the presentations by Linford D. Fisher (Brown University) and J. Stanley Lemons (Rhode Island College), who will discuss what this new essay tells us about Williams. Copies of their new book, Decoding Roger Williams (2014), co-authored with Lucas Mason-Brown, will also be available for purchase.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or click here to register.

close
Member Event, Special Event MHS Fellows and Members Holiday Party 3 December 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members. Cogswell snow scene

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to celebrate the season at the Society’s annual holiday party. Enjoy festive music, holiday cheer, and the annual tradition of reading the anti-Christmas laws.

Become a Member today!

close
Public Program Making History: King Philip's War in Documents & Artifacts 8 December 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  this event is free Facilitator: Bruce J. Schulman, Boston University

Students of the Boston University course "Making History" discuss the MHS exhibit on King Philip's War they have researched and compiled. The semester-long project on the bloody conflict between English colonists and Native Americans includes work on letters and diaries, sermons, early printed books, and objects from the war.

Bruce J. Schulman is the William E. Huntington Professor and Chair of the History Department at Boston University. His teaching and research concentrate on the history of the modern United States, particularly on the relationships between politics and broader cultural change. Schulman is currently at work on a volume for the Oxford History of the United States covering the years 1896-1929. He lives with his family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Image: Bowl attributed to the Wampanoag. Elm burl, 1655-1675. Massachusetts Historical Society .

close
Public Program Race to the Top of the World: Richard Byrd & the First Flight to the North Pole 11 December 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Sheldon Bart

Race to the Top of the World book coverOne hundred years ago—then as now—the eyes of the industrialized world were on the Arctic. It was widely held in this era that a new, uncharted continent would be found in the Arctic Ocean. Scientific treatises “proved” its existence. As aviation developed, the mythical land became endowed with commercial value and strategic importance. This was the context in which Richard Byrd (1888-1957) emerged as an explorer—an international quest for a mythic grail. His rivals included Roald Amundsen, Lincoln Ellsworth, and Hubert Wilkins.

The Arctic was considered as remote as outer space in the 1920s, and aerial exploits north of the Arctic Circle attracted a tremendous amount of attention. The New York Times called the race “the greatest story of the year.” The sensationalism, however, has never ended. Byrd’s flight to the North Pole has been bitterly disputed for the better part of a century, and almost every part of his early life and career has become controversial. Author Sheldon Bart offers compelling new evidence and new revelations to substantiate his thesis that the controversies still swirling around Admiral Byrd—including the legitimacy of his flight to the North Pole—are based on incomplete research, distortion, and superficial assessment.

Writer-explorer Sheldon Bart is a member of the Board of Governors of the American Polar Society and president and founder of Wilderness Research Foundation (WRF), a not-for-profit organization seeking to create more opportunities for scientific exploration beyond the limited regime of government funding. He organized and led the 1996 American Expedition to Baffin Island in the Canadian Eastern Arctic and was project manager of the 2010 WRF Antarctic Peninsula field program. Sheldon has lectured at the National Archives, the Explorers Club, the Virginia Historical Society, the National Museum of the U.S. Navy, the Geographical Society of Philadelphia, the Elisha Kent Kane Historical Society, Hunter College of the City University of New York, and the Byrd Polar Research Center at Ohio State University. He is a senior associate at LAPA Fundraising, a consulting firm based in New York City, and has published fiction and nonfiction. He is currently working on a novel based on his own polar adventures.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

close

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