COLLECTION GUIDES

1717-1946

Guide to the Collection


Collection Summary

Abstract

This collection consists of the papers of the Sedgwick family of western Massachusetts and New York City, specifically those of Theodore Sedgwick (1746-1813), his wife, children, and their descendants. Papers of the Minot family and other related families are also represented. Included are family correspondence, personal papers, business and professional papers, and historical documents collected by Theodore Sedgwick III.

Biographical Timeline and Sketches

The timeline of Sedgwick family events is followed by biographical sketches of Sedgwick family members, arranged alphabetically in three sections: Sedgwick family members, related families, and historical collection. To view a genealogical chart of the Sedgwick family, click here.

Timeline of Sedgwick Family Events

List of abbreviations:

CMS--Catharine Maria Sedgwick (1789-1867)
HDS--Henry Dwight Sedgwick (1785-1831)
HDS II--Henry Dwight Sedgwick II (1824-1903)
HDS III--Henry Dwight Sedgwick III (1861-1957)
TS--Theodore Sedgwick (1746-1813)
TS II--Theodore Sedgwick II (1780-1839)
TS III--Theodore Sedgwick III (1811-1859)
TS IV--Rev. Theodore Sedgwick (1863-1951)

1746
(May 9) TS is born in West Hartford, Conn., to Benjamin and Ann Thompson Sedgwick.
1761
TS enters Yale to study for the ministry, but is expelled before graduation for disciplinary issues.
1767
TS opens a law office in Sheffield, Mass.
1768
TS marries Eliza, the daughter of Jeremiah Mason of Franklin, Conn.
1771
(Apr. 12) Eliza Mason Sedgwick, eight months pregnant, dies of smallpox.
1774
(Apr. 17) TS marries Pamela, the daughter of Gen. Joseph Dwight of Great Barrington and Abigail Williams Sergeant.
(July 6) TS serves as clerk of the Berkshire Co. convention called to consider resistance to British taxation and protest the Intolerable Acts.
1775
(Apr. 30) Eliza Mason Sedgwick is born to Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick.
1776
TS becomes military secretary to Gen. John Thomas, whom he accompanied on the invasion of Canada.
1777
TS provides cattle, flour, and other supplies to the Northern Dept. of the Continental Army.
1778
(May 6) Frances Pamela Sedgwick is born to Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick.
1780
TS serves in the Massachusetts legislature as Sheffield's representative, although he loses the election in 1781.
(Dec. 9) Theodore Sedgwick II is born in Sheffield to Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick.
1781
TS defends former slave Elizabeth Freeman (Mumbet) in the Berkshire Court of Common Pleas case Brom and Bett v. J. Ashley, Esq., arguing successfully for her freedom based on the new Massachusetts constitution.
1782
TS is re-elected as representative to the Massachusetts legislature.
1784
TS is elected to the Massachusetts Senate.
TS is appointed a commissioner to settle the Massachusetts boundary dispute with New York.
1785
TS is elected a representative to the Continental Congress.
(Sep. 22) Henry Dwight Sedgwick is born to Theodore and Pamela Sedgwick in Stockbridge.
1786
TS and family move to their newly built home in Stockbridge.
TS is one of the leaders of the Massachusetts Militia to suppress the rebels of Shays' Rebellion, leading to threats on his life and home.
1787
(June 6) Robert Sedgwick is born to Theodore and Pamela Sedgwick at Stockbridge.
1787-1788
TS is elected a representative in the Massachusetts legislature.
1788
TS serves as Speaker of the House in the Massachusetts legislature and as a delegate to the Massachusetts convention to ratify the U.S. Constitution.
1789
(Dec. 28) Catharine Maria Sedgwick is born to Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick in Stockbridge.
1789-1796
As a member of the Federalist Party, TS serves in the U.S. House of Representatives, chairing several committees.
1791
(Dec. 14) Charles Sedgwick is born to Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick.
1796-1799
TS is elected to the U.S. Senate, serving as president pro tempore for a few weeks in 1798.
1797
(Apr. 23) Eliza Sedgwick marries Thaddeus Pomeroy of Stockbridge, Mass.
1798
TS II graduates from Yale College and begins studying law with his father.
1799-1801
TS returns to the U.S. House of Representatives as Speaker.
1801
TS II is admitted to the bar and settles in Albany, N.Y., to practice law.
(Apr. 9) Frances Sedgwick marries Ebenezer Watson.
1802
TS is appointed to the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts.
1803
TS II settles in Albany and forms a legal partnership with Harmanus Bleecker.
1804
HDS and Robert Sedgwick graduate from Williams College and begin law studies.
1807
(Sep. 20) Pamela Sedgwick dies after repeated bouts of insanity at age 54.
1808
(Nov. 7) TS marries Penelope, the daughter of Dr. Charles Russell of Boston.
(Nov. 28) TS II marries Susan Anne Livingston Ridley, the granddaughter of Gov. William Livingston of New Jersey.
1811
(Jan. 27) TS III is born in Albany, New York, to TS II and Susan Ridley Sedgwick.
1813
(Jan. 24) TS dies while visiting Boston, at age 66.
(Dec. 8) Maria Banyer Sedgwick is born in Stockbridge to TS II and Susan Ridley Sedgwick.
1817
(Apr. 7) William Minot II is born to William and Louisa Davis Minot in Boston.
(June 2) HDS marries Jane Minot in Boston.
1819
(Sep. 30) Charles Sedgwick marries Elizabeth Buckminster Dwight.
1820
(Sep. 15) Katharine Maria Sedgwick, the daughter of Charles and Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, is born in Stockbridge.
1821
TS II accepts the position of U.S. charge d'affaires at The Hague, but because of poor health, soon retires permanently to Stockbridge.
(Feb. 20) Jane Minot Sedgwick is born to HDS and Jane Sedgwick in New York City.
1822
CMS anonymously publishes her first novel, A New England Tale.
Charles Sedgwick II is born to Charles and Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick.
(Aug. 21) Robert Sedgwick marries Elizabeth Dana Ellery of Newport, Rhode Island.
(Sep. 6) Frances Sedgwick is born in Stockbridge to HDS and Jane Sedgwick.
1823
TS II becomes president of the Berkshire County Agricultural Society.
TS II publishes Hints for the People, with Some Thought on the Presidential Election, by Rusticus.
ca. 1828
HDS begins experiencing symptoms of mental illness.
1824
CMS publishes Redwood.
(Jan. 27) Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick is born to Robert and Elizabeth Sedgwick.
(Aug. 16) Henry Dwight Sedgwick II is born in Stockbridge to HDS and Jane Sedgwick.
1824-1825
TS II serves in the Massachusetts legislature as representative from Stockbridge.
1825
CMS publishes The Travelers.
(Mar. 28) William Ellery Sedgwick is born to Robert and Elizabeth Sedgwick.
1826
TS II publishes a collection of essays, Hints to My Countrymen.
(July 15) Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick is born to Charles and Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick.
(Oct. 24). Louisa Minot Sedgwick is born in Stockbridge to HDS and Jane Sedgwick.
1827
CMS publishes Hope Leslie, or Early Times in America.
(Oct. 15) Eliza Sedgwick Pomeroy, the daughter of TS, dies.
TS II serves in the Massachusetts legislature, introducing a bill for the construction of the Boston and Albany Railroad at state expense.
1828
(Jan. 28) Susan Ridley Sedgwick is born to Robert and Elizabeth Sedgwick.
1829
Susan Ridley Sedgwick, the wife of TS II, begins writing children's stories.
TS III graduates from Columbia University after a public school education in New York City and Stockbridge.
(Oct. 18) Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick is born to Robert and Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick in New York City.
1830
CMS publishes Clarence; or a Tale of Our Own Times.
1831
TS II delivers an anti-slavery address, The Practicability of the Abolition of Slavery, at the Stockbridge Lyceum, which is published later that year.
(June 27) William Dwight Sedgwick is born to Charles and Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick.
(Oct. 7) Katherine Maria Sedgwick is born to Robert and Elizabeth Sedgwick in New York City.
(Dec. 23) HDS dies in Stockbridge at age 46 after extensive mental illness.
1833
TS III is admitted to the New York bar.
(Mar. 5) Grace Ashburner Sedgwick is born to Charles and Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick at Lenox, Mass.
1834
TS II returns to New York and begins his law practice.
TS III is appointed attaché to the U.S. legation in Paris under Edward Livingston.
1835
CMS publishes The Linwoods; or "Sixty Years Since" in America.
(May 1) TS III begins a law practice with his uncle Robert Sedgwick in New York City.
(Sep. 28) TS III marries Sarah Morgan Ashburner of Stockbridge.
1836
TS II visits Europe.
William Minot II receives his A.B. from Harvard College.
(July 16) Helen Ellery Sedgwick is born to Robert and Elizabeth Sedgwick.
1836-1839
TS II publishes his most important work, Public and Private Economy, in three volumes, with observances from his trip to Europe.
1838
(Feb. 21) Susan Ridley Sedgwick is born at Stockbridge to TS III and Sarah Ashburner Sedgwick.
(Mar.) Robert Sedgwick suffers a paralyzing stroke, from which he never fully recovers.
(Apr. 14) Edith Ellery Sedgwick is born to Robert and Elizabeth Sedgwick, but dies four months later.
1839
(May) Robert Sedgwick travels to Europe in an attempt to recover his health. He is gone for fifteen months.
(Nov. 7) At age 58, TS II dies from a stroke after giving an address to the Democrats of Pittsfield.
(Nov. 8). Sarah Price Ashburner Sedgwick is born to TS III and Sarah Ashburner Sedgwick.
1839-1840
CMS travels abroad for fifteen months.
1841
CMS publishes Letters from Abroad to Kindred at Home.
Charles Sedgwick II, the son of Charles and Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, commits suicide in Liverpool.
(Sep. 2) Robert Sedgwick dies at Sachem's Head, Connecticut, at age 54.
(Oct. 13) Louisa Minot Sedgwick, the daughter of HDS, dies two weeks before her fifteenth birthday.
1842
(June 20) Frances Sedgwick Watson, the daughter of Theodore Sedgwick, dies at Stockbridge at age 64.
(Nov. 28) Katherine Maria Sedgwick, the daughter of Charles Sedgwick, marries William Minot II in Boston.
1843
HDS II graduates from Harvard College.
1844
(Oct. 2) Jane Sedgwick Minot is born to William and Katherine Sedgwick Minot.
(Oct. 6) Arthur George Sedgwick is born in New York City to TS III and Sarah Ashburner Sedgwick.
1846
HDS II forms the law firm of Storrs and Sedgwick in New York City.
HDS II and his sister Jane travel to Europe.
William Ellery Sedgwick, the son of Robert, graduates from Harvard College.
1847
(Mar. 2) Dr. Thaddeus Pomeroy, the widower of Eliza Sedgwick Pomeroy, dies in Stockbridge.
(July 10) Alice Woodbourne Minot is born to William and Katherine Sedgwick Minot.
(Nov. 18) "Posey," Jane Sedgwick Minot, the first child of William and Katherine Sedgwick Minot, dies at age 3.
1849
(May 7) William Minot III is born to William and Katherine Sedgwick Minot in Boston.
1850
TS III discontinues his law practice because of ill health.
(Nov. 26) William Ellery Sedgwick marries Constance Irving Brevoort.
(Dec.) Helen (Nellie) Sedgwick, the 14-year-old daughter of Robert, falls down a flight of stairs and suffers serious injuries.
1851-1852
TS III travels to Italy, Switzerland, France, and England.
1852
TS III becomes president of the newly incorporated Association for the Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations (Crystal Palace Association) and carries on much correspondence in that capacity.
(Dec. 23) Charles Sedgwick Minot is born to William and Katherine Sedgwick Minot in Boston.
(Jan. 12) Robert Sedgwick is born to William Ellery and Constance Brevoort Sedgwick in New York City.
1853
Ill health forces TS III to retire to New York, then Stockbridge.
(Aug. 1) Henry Brevoort Sedgwick is born to William Ellery and Constance Brevoort Sedgwick in Lenox. He dies eight months later.
1854
CMS travels west as far as the Mississippi River.
(Sep. 1) Francis Edward Sedgwick is born to William Ellery and Constance Brevoort Sedgwick in New York City.
1855
(June 20) Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, the daughter of Charles Sedgwick, marries Frederick William Rackemann.
(Oct. 1) Susan Ridley Sedgwick, the daughter of Robert Sedgwick, marries Charles E. Butler.
1856
(Aug. 3) Charles Sedgwick dies at age 64 in Lenox.
(Aug. 20) Robert Sedgwick Minot is born to William and Katherine Sedgwick Minot in Boston.
(Sep. 15) William Ellery Sedgwick is born to William Ellery and Constance Brevoort Sedgwick in New York City.
1857
TS III declines President Buchanan's offer to become minister to the Netherlands and assistant secretary of state.
CMS publishes her last novel, Married or Single?
(June 17) Helen Ellery Sedgwick, the daughter of Robert Sedgwick, dies at age 21.
(July 15) William Dwight Sedgwick, the son of Charles Sedgwick, marries Louise Tellkampf of Hanover, Germany.
(Oct. 15) HDS II marries his first cousin, Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, in New York City.
1858
TS III is appointed U.S. district attorney of the southern district of New York.
(May 21) Susan Ridley Sedgwick, the daughter of TS III, marries Charles Eliot Norton in Stockbridge.
1859
(Feb. 22) Laura Brevoort Sedgwick is born to William Ellery and Constance Brevoort Sedgwick in Lenox.
(Feb. 24) Jane Minot Sedgwick dies in New York City at age 63.
(July 30) Jane Minot Sedgwick II is born to HDS II and Henrietta Sedgwick at Stockbridge.
(Aug. 18) Henry Davis Minot is born to William and Katherine Sedgwick Minot in Boston.
(Dec. 8) TS III dies in Stockbridge at age 45.
1860
(Aug. 20) Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, the daughter of Robert, marries Francis J. Child.
1861
(Sep. 5) Helen Ellery Sedgwick is born to William Ellery and Constance Brevoort Sedgwick in Lenox.
(Sep. 24) HDS III is born to HDS II and Henrietta Sedgwick at Stockbridge.
1862
(Sep. 6) Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, the widow of Robert Sedgwick, dies at Stockbridge at age 63.
(Sep. 29) William Dwight Sedgwick, the son of Charles Sedgwick, dies from a wound received at Antietam as a major in the Union Army.
(Oct. 12) Helen Maria Child is born to Francis J. and Elizabeth Sedgwick Child.
1863
(Aug. 2) Theodore Sedgwick is born to HDS II and Henrietta Sedgwick in Stockbridge.
1864
Arthur Sedgwick graduates from Harvard and becomes a first lieutenant in the 20th Massachusetts Regiment. He is captured at Deep Bottom, Virginia, and sent to Libby Prison.
(Nov. 18) Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, the widow of Charles Sedgwick, dies at age 63 in Lenox.
1865
(May 19) Laurence Minot is born to William and Katherine Sedgwick Minot in Boston.
1866
(Aug. 14) Susan Ridley Sedgwick Child is born to Francis J. and Elizabeth Sedgwick Child.
1867
(Jan. 20) Susan Ridley Sedgwick dies in Stockbridge at age 77.
(Jan. 24) Alexander Sedgwick is born to HDS II and Henrietta Sedgwick in New York City.
(July 31) CMS dies in West Roxbury at the home of her niece, Katherine Sedgwick Minot.
(Nov. 2) Henrietta Ellery Child is born to Francis J. and Elizabeth Sedgwick Child.
1868
(June 12) Francis Sedgwick Child is born to Francis J. and Elizabeth Sedgwick Child.
1869
William Ellery Sedgwick, the son of William Ellery and Constance Sedgwick, dies at age 13.
Arthur Sedgwick revises and republishes his father's text Sedgwick on Damages.
1871
(Nov. 22) Katherine Sedgwick Valerio, the daughter of Robert Sedgwick and the widow of Joseph Valerio of Genoa, Italy, marries William T. Washburn.
1872
(Feb. 17) Susan Sedgwick Norton, the daughter of TS III dies in Dresden, Germany, after the birth of her sixth child, at age 33.
(Feb. 27) Ellery Sedgwick is born to HDS II and Henrietta Sedgwick in New York City.
Arthur George Sedgwick begins work at The Nation in New York, working there until 1884.
1873
(Feb. 4) Nathalie D'Oremieulx Washburn is born to Katherine Sedgwick Valerio Washburn and William T. Washburn in New York City.
(Apr. 16) William Ellery Sedgwick, the son of Robert, dies in New York City at the home of his cousin HDS II, at the age of 47.
1879
(Nov. 28) Sarah Ashburner Sedgwick, the daughter of TS III, marries William Erasmus Darwin.
1880
HDS II semi-retires from his New York law practice and returns to Stockbridge.
(June 29) Katherine Sedgwick Minot, the daughter of Charles Sedgwick, dies in Boston at age 59.
1881
Arthur George Sedgwick begins work with the New York Evening Post.
1882
HDS III graduates from Harvard College.
(Nov. 16) Arthur George Sedgwick, the son of TS III, marries Lucy Tuckerman of New York.
1883
(Mar. 17) Susan Sedgwick Butler, the daughter of Robert Sedgwick, dies in Newport, Rhode Island, at age 55.
(Dec. 15) Alice Woodbourne Minot dies at age 36.
1884
HDS III is admitted to the bar and begins practicing law in New York with his father.
(Sep.) Katherine Sedgwick Valerio Washburn dies in Lagenschwalbach, Germany, at age 52. Her 10-year-old daughter Nathalie moves to the home of her uncle HDS II in Stockbridge and takes the name Natalie Sedgwick.
1886
TS IV, the son of HDS II, graduates from Harvard College.
1888
Alexander Sedgwick moves to California for his health.
1889
(Feb. 12) Jane Minot Sedgwick II, the daughter of HDS, dies at age 67.
1890
Theodore Sedgwick graduates from the Berkeley Divinity School in Middletown, Connecticut, and is ordained an Episcopal priest.
1891
(Sep. 24) Elizabeth Sedgwick Rackemann, the daughter of Charles Sedgwick, dies at age 65.
1894
Ellery Sedgwick, the son of HDS II, graduates from Harvard College.
(Feb. 26) William Minot II dies in Boston at age 76.
1895
Natalie Sedgwick (formerly Nathalie Washburn) marries lawyer Bainbridge Colby in Stockbridge.
(Oct. 22) Alexander Sedgwick marries Lydia Cameron Rogers.
(Nov. 7) HDS III marries Sarah Minturn in New York City.
1897
(Feb. 8) Grace Sedgwick Bristed, the daughter of Charles Sedgwick, dies in St. Cloud, France, at age 63.
1898
Elizabeth Sedgwick Child dies in Cambridge at age 78.
1900
Jane Sedgwick, the daughter of HDS II, travels to Italy aboard the steamer Furst Brunswick and meets her brother HDS III in Europe. Jane decides to stay in Italy.
1901
Theodore Sedgwick, the son of HDS II, moves to St. Paul, Minnesota, to become minister of the Church of St. John the Evangelist.
1902
(Feb. 22) Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick dies in Stockbridge at age 72.
1903
(May) Theodore Sedgwick, the son of HDS II, marries Mary Aspinwall Bend in St. Paul, Minn.
(Dec. 26) HDS II dies in Rome at age 79.
1904
Ellery Sedgwick, the son of HDS II, marries Mabel Cabot at Brookline, Mass.
1909
Ellery Sedgwick becomes editor of the Atlantic Monthly.
1912-1913
Alexander Sedgwick serves as the Massachusetts state representative from Stockbridge.
1914
Jane Minot Sedgwick II, the daughter of HDS II, marries Michele Ricciardi in Naples.
(Aug.) Christiana, the daughter of Alexander Sedgwick, travels to Paris with the Amory family and, because of the war, is temporarily unable to return home.
1915
Alexander Sedgwick serves on the board for the Panama Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco.
(July 4) Arthur George Sedgwick, the son of TS III, dies in Pittsfield at age 70.
1918
Alexander Sedgwick serves in Europe as a captain of the U.S. Army.
(Apr. 18) Jane Sedgwick Ricciardi, the daughter of HDS II, dies in Naples, Italy, at age 59.
1919
(Jan. 26) Sarah "May" Minturn Sedgwick, the wife of HDS III, dies in Boston at age 57.
1929
(Oct. 18) Alexander Sedgwick, the son of HDS II, dies in Bath, New York, at age 62.

Sedgwick Family Members

Arranged alphabetically.

Susan Ridley Sedgwick Butler (1828-1883)
Born on 28 January 1828 to Robert and Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, Susan married Charles E. Butler, a lawyer practicing in New York City, on 1 October 1855. They had three children--Charles Sedgwick, Henrietta Sedgwick, and Robert Sedgwick--all of whom died at a young age. After Susan died on 17 March 1883, her husband commissioned St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Stockbridge built in her memory.

Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick Child (1824-1909)
"Lizzie." The oldest child of Robert and Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, Elizabeth was born on 27 January 1824. She married Francis J. Child, a Harvard College professor of English and rhetoric, on 20 August 1860, and they had four children: Helen Maria, Susan Ridley Sedgwick, Henrietta Sedgwick, and Francis Sedgwick. She died in Cambridge on 6 September 1909.

Katherine Sedgwick Minot (1820-1880)
"Kate." The oldest child of Charles and Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, Katherine was born in Lenox on 15 September 1820 and was named after her aunt Catharine Maria Sedgwick. She attended schools in the Berkshires and New York City, receiving an excellent education. Katherine met William Minot II when she visited Rome, and they married in 1842. Katherine and William had seven children: Jane Sedgwick, Alice Woodbourne, William III, Charles Sedgwick, Robert Sedgwick, Henry Davis, and Laurence. They lived in Boston and later at "Woodbourne," the Minot family's home in West Roxbury. Throughout her life, she maintained a close relationship with her aunt Catharine Maria Sedgwick, who died at Katherine's home in 1867. Katherine died in Boston on 29 June 1880.

William Minot II (1817-1894)
The second son of William and Louisa Davis Minot and the grandson of George Richards Minot, William was born on 7 April 1817. After graduating from Harvard College in 1836 and Harvard Law School in 1840, he was admitted to the bar in 1841. He traveled to Europe because of ill health, then returned to work at 39 Court St., Boston, the law office where his father and grandfather had practiced. William gained a respected reputation in business law and, with his father, specialized in trust administration. He married Katherine Maria Sedgwick in 1842 and had seven children. After the death of his wife in 1880, he moved from "Woodbourne," the family estate, to 22 Marlborough St. in Boston, where he lived until his death in 1894.

Eliza Sedgwick Pomeroy (1775-1827)
The oldest child of Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, Eliza was born on 30 April 1775. On 23 April 1797, she married Thaddeus Pomeroy of Stockbridge, a medical doctor. Their twelve children were: Theodore Sedgwick, George Williams, Egbert Benson, Pamela Dwight, Elizabeth Pamela, Ebenezer Watson, Frances Susan, Catherine Eliza, Julia, Charles Sedgwick, Mary, and Thaddeus. She died on 15 October 1827.

Elizabeth Sedgwick Rackemann (1826-1891)
"Bessie." The third child of Charles and Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, Elizabeth was born on 15 July 1826. She married Frederick William Rackemann of Bremen, Germany, in 1855, and they had six children: Charles Sedgwick, Frederick William, Jr., Felix, Elizabeth Sedgwick, Louise Sedgwick, and William Frederick. She died on 24 September 1891.

Jane Sedgwick Ricciardi (1859-1918)
"Blossom." Born on 30 July 1859 in Stockbridge, Jane was the eldest child and only daughter of Henry Dwight and Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick. Living in Europe for most of her life, Jane translated and published the works of Greek poets. She remained single until 1914, when at the age of 55, she married Michele Ricciardi, a law professor at the University of Naples. She died on 18 April 1918 in Naples.

Alexander Sedgwick (1867-1929)
"Aleck." The fourth child of Henry Dwight and Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, Aleck was born on 24 January 1867 in New York City. Throughout his life, he suffered from poor health. He attended Bishop's College School in Lennoxville, Quebec, and traveled widely in Europe and California. Returning to Massachusetts, he and his family lived in Stockbridge in the Sedgwick family home built by his great-grandfather, Theodore Sedgwick, in 1785. He married Lydia Cameron Rogers of Buffalo, New York, on 2 October 1895, and they had three children: William Ellery, Christiana Davenport, and Alexander Cameron. A Democrat, Alexander was elected representative to the Massachusetts General Court in 1912-1913 and served as an ambulance driver in Italy during World War I. Following in his father's footsteps, he became president of the Laurel Hill Association of Stockbridge and was a member of the Union Club of Boston and the Century Club of New York City. He died in Bath, New York, on 18 October 1929.

Alexander C. Sedgwick (1901-1996)
"Shan." Born on 8 February 1901 to Alexander and Lydia Rogers Sedgwick in Stockbridge, he worked as the Middle East correspondent for the New York Times and as the Associated Press correspondent in Greece in the 1930s. He married Roxane Soteriadis of Greece and lived in that country for most of his later years. Alexander died in Greece on 19 January 1996.

Arthur George Sedgwick (1844-1915)
The fifth child of Theodore Sedgwick III and Sarah Ashburner Sedgwick, Arthur was born on 6 October 1844 in New York City. He graduated from Harvard in 1864 and immediately enlisted in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He served from 23 June 1864 to 3 February 1865 as a first lieutenant, was captured at Deep Bottom, Virginia, and was jailed in Libby Prison. Following his service, he entered Harvard Law School, later becoming editor of the American Law Review. In addition to completing a revision of his father's work Sedgwick on Damages, he also served on the editorial staff of the New York Evening Post and The Nation. Arthur married Lucy Tuckerman on 16 November 1882, and the couple had two children: Grace Ashburner and Susan Ridley. Although he inherited the family home in Stockbridge, Arthur later sold it to his cousin Henry Dwight Sedgwick II. He died in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, on 14 July 1915.

Catharine Maria Sedgwick (1789-1867)
Born in Stockbridge on 28 December 1789, Catherine was the sixth child of Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick. In 1822, she anonymously published her first novel, A New England Tale; or Sketches of New England Character and Manners, inspired by her recent conversion to Unitarianism. With her novels Redwood (1824), Hope Leslie (1827), Clarence, or a Tale of Our Own Times (1830), and The Linwoods, or "Sixty Years Since" in America (1835), she earned a place as one of America's most popular and well-known authors. Although courted by many prominent men of her time, Catharine chose to remain unmarried and devote herself to her writing, residing in Lenox and in the various homes of her brothers and nieces. In 1857, she published her last novel, Married or Single? She died in West Roxbury at "Woodbourne," the home of her niece Katherine Maria Sedgwick Minot, on 31 July 1867.

Charles Sedgwick (1791-1856)
Born on 15 December 1791 in Stockbridge, Charles was the youngest child of Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick. He married Elizabeth Buckminster Dwight on 30 September 1819, and they moved to Lenox the following year. Charles and Elizabeth had five children: Katharine Maria, Charles, Elizabeth Dwight, William Dwight, and Grace Ashburner. Throughout his life, he maintained a close relationship with his sister Catharine Maria Sedgwick, who, along with his daughter Katherine Sedgwick Minot, edited his correspondence for publication following his death. Although he was the only one of Theodore Sedgwick's sons who did not attend college, Charles was widely known and respected for his intellectual skills. After studying law and passing the bar, he served most of his career as clerk of the courts in Berkshire County, Massachusetts. Ill health forced him to resign in 1856, and he died later that year.

Elizabeth Buckminster Dwight Sedgwick (1801-1864)
The daughter of Josiah and Rhoda Edwards Dwight, and the great-granddaughter of Jonathan Edwards, Elizabeth was born on 17 September 1801. She married Charles Sedgwick in 1819, and they had five children. For over thirty years, Elizabeth served as headmistress of a nationally recognized girls' school in Lenox. Close friends with her sister-in-law Catharine Maria Sedgwick, as well as actress Fanny Kemble (Butler), she was herself a prolific children's author. Her works include Stories of the Spanish Conquest in America (1830), Louisa and her Cousins (1831), The Beatitudes (1832), and A Talk with My Pupils (1863).

Elizabeth Dana Ellery Sedgwick (1799-1862)
"Lizzie." Elizabeth was born to William and Abigail Shaw Ellery in Newport, Rhode Island, on 27 August 1799. Her grandfather, William Ellery, was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. She married Robert Sedgwick on 21 August 1822. When he died in 1841, she was left with seven children between the ages of 3 and 17. She died in Stockbridge on 6 September 1862.

Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick (1829-1902)
"Netta." Born on 18 October 1829 in New York City to Robert and Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, Henrietta married her first cousin, Henry Dwight Sedgwick II, on 15 October 1857. Although her husband practiced law in New York City, she raised their five children--Jane Minot, Henry Dwight III, Theodore, Alexander, and Ellery--in Stockbridge, where her husband joined them almost every weekend. She died in Stockbridge on 23 February 1902 at the age of 72.

Henry Dwight Sedgwick (1785-1831)
"Harry." The second son of Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, Henry was born in Stockbridge on 22 September 1785. Along with his brother Robert, he graduated from Williams College in 1804 and studied law with his father in Stockbridge, his brother Theodore Sedgwick II in Albany, and briefly at Tapping Reeve's Law School in Litchfield, Connecticut. Practicing primarily in New York City, Henry authored numerous essays, including "English Practice of Common Law" (1822), and his articles appeared in North American Review and Banner of the Constitution. He married Jane Minot, the daughter of George Richards Minot and the sister of William Minot, on 2 June 1817, and they had five children: George Minot, Jane Minot, Frances, Henry Dwight II, and Louisa Minot. Increasing mental illness forced him to retire and return to Stockbridge, and he was institutionalized in 1828-1829 at McLean Asylum. Henry died in Stockbridge on 23 December 1831.

Henry Dwight Sedgwick II (1824-1903)
"Hal." Born in New York City on 16 August 1824 to Henry Dwight and Jane Minot Sedgwick, Henry graduated from Harvard College in 1843 and Harvard Law School in 1846. He practiced law at the firm of Storrs and Sedgwick in New York City from 1846 until about 1860. On 15 October 1857, he married his first cousin, Henrietta, the daughter of his uncle Robert Sedgwick. For over twenty years, Henry commuted almost weekly between his law office in New York City and his wife and five children in Stockbridge, and he was an active member of the Century and Union League Clubs of New York. In his later years, he returned to his family home in Stockbridge and was deeply involved in community activities. He helped to found the Laurel Hill Association, the first village improvement society in the country, and served as its president for over twenty years. Henry died in Rome on 26 December 1903 at the age of 79.

Henry Dwight Sedgwick III (1861-1957)
"Hal." The second child and oldest son of Henry Dwight and Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, Hal was born 24 September 1861 in Stockbridge. He graduated from Harvard College in 1882, was admitted to the bar in 1884, and began practicing in New York City with his father. Retiring from law about 1898, Henry devoted his life to traveling and writing. In 1893, he was elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and became a prolific historian and author. Among his works were A Short History of Italy (1905), Ignatius Loyola (1923), and Cortes the Conqueror (1926). He married Sarah Minturn in New York City on 7 November 1895. They had four children: Henry Dwight IV; Robert Minturn; Francis Minturn; and Edith Minturn, who died at birth. Henry Dwight Sedgwick III died on 5 January 1957.

Jane Minot Sedgwick (1795-1859)
Born in 1795 to George Richards and Mary Speakman Minot, Jane married Henry Dwight Sedgwick on 2 June 1817, and together they had five children. Beginning about 1828, when her husband's mental illness began to worsen, she assumed increasing responsibility for her family's business and financial affairs. Jane outlived her husband by 28 years before she died in New York City on 24 February 1859 at the age of 63.

Jane Minot Sedgwick II (1821-1889)
The oldest daughter of Henry Dwight and Jane Minot Sedgwick, Jane was born on 20 February 1821 in New York City. She converted to Catholicism in 1853 and spent much of her adult life in Rome. Remaining unmarried, she founded a Catholic school in West Stockbridge and was active in the West Stockbridge Catholic parish administration. She died on 12 February 1889.

Lydia Rogers Sedgwick (1867- 1934)
"Lily." The daughter of Sherman S. and Christina Cameron Davenport Rogers of Buffalo, New York, Lydia married Alexander Sedgwick on 2 October 1895. Their three children were Christiana Davenport, William Ellery, and Alexander Cameron Sedgwick. A trustee of the Stockbridge Public Library Association and a member of the Colonial Dames of America, she continued to live in Stockbridge after her husband's death. She died on 12 April 1934.

Pamela Dwight Sedgwick (1753-1807)
The daughter of Brigadier General Joseph Dwight of Great Barrington and his second wife, Abigail Williams (Sergeant) Dwight, Pamela was born on 26 June 1753. She became Theodore Sedgwick's second wife in 1774, and the couple had ten children, seven of whom lived to adulthood. They were: Eliza Mason, Frances Pamela, Theodore II, Henry Dwight, Robert, Catharine Maria, and Charles. Forced to endure her husband's long absences from home during the course of his political career, she suffered recurring episodes of mental illness and was institutionalized on several occasions. She died on 20 September 1807 in Stockbridge.

Robert Sedgwick (1787-1841)
The son of Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, Robert was born on 6 June 1787 in Stockbridge, and graduated from Williams College in 1804. He married Elizabeth Dana Ellery of Newport, Rhode Island, on 21 August 1822, and they had eight children. Robert invested widely in New York real estate and practiced law in New York City, at first with his brother Henry Dwight Sedgwick, then with D.D. Field, and beginning in May 1835, with his nephew Theodore Sedgwick III. In March 1838, Robert suffered a paralyzing stroke, from which he never fully recovered. Theodore took over his law practice, and Robert went to Europe from May 1839 to August 1840 in an attempt to recover his health. He died in Sachem's Head, Connecticut, on 2 September 1841.

Susan Livingston Ridley Sedgwick (1788-1867)
Susan was born on 24 May 1788, the daughter of Matthew and Catherine Livingston Ridley and granddaughter of Governor William Livingston. She married Theodore Sedgwick II on 28 November 1808, and they had two children, Theodore III and Maria Banyer Sedgwick. A popular author, she wrote children's stories and other novels, including The Morals of Pleasure (1829), The Young Immigrants (1830), Allan Prescott (1834), and Alida (1844). She died in Stockbridge on 20 January 1867.

Theodore Sedgwick (1746-1813)
The fourth child of Deacon Benjamin and Ann Thompson Sedgwick, Theodore was born on 9 May 1746 in Hartford, Connecticut. After attending Yale College, Theodore studied law with Mark Hopkins at Great Barrington, Mass., and after his admittance to the bar in 1766, he practiced law in Great Barrington and Sheffield, Mass. As secretary to the Berkshire County committee in 1774, he helped to develop the "Berkshire Covenant," which proposed peaceful resistance to the British. He served on the staff of General John Thomas to reinforce Arnold's siege of Quebec in 1776 and, the following year, became a commissary for the northern Continental Army, supplying cattle, flour, and other necessities. Theodore moved his law practice to Stockbridge in 1785, and he there built the house that would become known as the "Sedgwick Mansion." Serving as a member of the Massachusetts legislature, Theodore was also a representative to the Continental Congress in 1785-1786. He actively worked to suppress Shays' Rebellion in 1787, resulting in several attacks to his home and threats on his life. Elected to the First Federal Congress in 1789, Theodore later ran for office as a member of the Federalist Party, serving six years in the U.S. House of Representatives, three years in the Senate (one year as President pro tem), then three more years in the House as Speaker of the House (1799-1801). In 1802, he was appointed to the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, serving there until his death.

Theodore was married three times, first to Eliza Mason, who died about 1771, within a year of their marriage. On 17 April 1774, he married Pamela Dwight, the mother of his ten children (seven of whom lived to adulthood). Theodore's wife Pamela died in 1807 after an extended mental illness, and he married Penelope Russell in November 1808. He died on 24 January 1813 and is buried in Stockbridge.

Theodore Sedgwick II (1780-1839)
The oldest son of Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, Theodore Sedgwick II was born in Sheffield on 9 December 1780. Graduating from Yale College in 1798, he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1801. He settled in Albany, N.Y., in 1803 and began a law practice with Harmanus Bleecker. Theodore married Susan Livingston Ridley, a granddaughter of Governor William Livingston of New Jersey, on 28 November 1808, and they had two children. In 1821, he was appointed the U.S. charge d'affaires at The Hague, Netherlands, but he returned to Stockbridge within a year because of ill health and devoted his time to writing, agriculture, and state politics. He served as a representative in the Massachusetts legislature in 1824-1825 and again in 1827, where he was an early advocate of the Boston and Albany Railroad. His published essays and addresses include Hints to My Countrymen (1826) and The Practicability of the Abolition of Slavery (1831). In 1838, he published his most important work, the multi-volume Public and Private Economy. Theodore died from a stroke on 7 November 1839 after delivering an address to the Democrats of Pittsfield, at the age of 58.

Theodore Sedgwick III (1811-1859)
The third Theodore Sedgwick was born in Albany, N.Y., on 27 January 1811 to Theodore and Susan Ridley Sedgwick. After a public school education in New York City and Stockbridge, he graduated from Columbia College in 1829. Admitted to the bar in 1833, he became attaché at the U.S. embassy in Paris under his cousin, Edward Livingston. He returned to New York and began practicing law, joining his uncle Robert Sedgwick's practice in May 1835 and taking over the law office when Robert was debilitated by a stroke in 1838. Ill health forced Theodore Sedgwick III himself to retire from law in 1850, and he spent the next several years traveling to Italy, Switzerland, France, and England. In 1852, he became president of the Crystal Palace Association, organizing the construction of the building for the New York World's Fair. The author of several widely used legal textbooks, including A Treatise on the Measure of Damages (1847) and Statutes and Constitutional Law (1857), Theodore declined President James Buchanan's offer to become minister to the Netherlands and assistant secretary of state in 1857, and in 1858, he became the U.S. district attorney of the southern district of New York. Theodore married Sarah Morgan Ashburner of Stockbridge on 28 September 1835, and they had seven children, three of whom died in infancy. He died in Stockbridge on 9 December 1859.

Rev. Theodore Sedgwick (1863- 1951)
"Teedy." Born on 2 August 1863 to Henry Dwight and Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, the fourth Theodore Sedgwick graduated from Harvard College in 1886 and from the Berkeley Divinity School in Middleton, Connecticut, in 1890. From 1890-1934, he served as rector of St. John's Church in Williamstown, Mass., the Church of St. John the Evangelist in St. Paul, Minnesota, Calvary Episcopal Church in New York City, St. Andrew's Memorial Church in Yonkers, and St. Paul's Church in Rome. Theodore Sedgwick IV married Mary Aspinwall Bend of St. Paul, Minnesota, in May 1903, and they had four children. He died in Sharon, Connecticut, on 22 May 1951.

William Dwight Sedgwick (1831-1862)
The second son of Charles and Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, William was born in Lenox on 27 June 1831. After attending Harvard College in 1851, he studied law for a year, then traveled abroad to study in Germany. There he married Louisa Frederica Tellkampf of Hanover, Germany, on 15 July 1857, and they had three daughters. In 1861, William joined the 2nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, later becoming a major on the staff of Major-General John Sedgwick. He was fatally wounded at Antietam on 29 September 1862.

William Ellery Sedgwick (1825-1873)
"Ell." Born on 28 March 1825 to Robert and Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, William was called "Ellery" or "Ell" by his family and friends. He graduated from Harvard College in 1846 and practiced law in New York City. He married Constance Irving Brevoort on 26 November 1850, and they had six children. He died on 16 April 1873 at the home of his cousin Henry Dwight Sedgwick II in New York City.

Katherine Sedgwick Valerio Washburn (1831-1884)
"Kate." Named for her famous aunt Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Katherine was born on 7 October 1831 in New York City to Robert and Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick. Her first husband was Joseph Valerio of Genoa, Italy. After his death, she married William T. Washburn on 22 November 1871, with whom she had a daughter, Nathalie D'Oremieulx Washburn. Katherine died on September 1884 at Lagenschwalbach, Germany. Her sister and brother-in-law, Henrietta Ellery and Henry Dwight Sedgwick II, raised her daughter, who took the name Natalie Sedgwick.

Frances Sedgwick Watson (1778-1842)
Born to Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick on 6 May 1778, Frances married Ebenezer Watson of Hartford, Connecticut, on 2 April 1801. The family subsequently moved to New York City, where Ebenezer worked as a publisher, and they later lived in Albany, New York. The mother of five children, she was the victim of domestic abuse, and her marriage was a difficult one. She died on 20 June 1842 in Stockbridge.

Frances Sedgwick Watts (1822-1858)
"Fanny." The second daughter of Henry Dwight and Jane Minot Sedgwick, Fanny was born on 6 September 1822. She married Alexander Watts of Fordham, New York, with whom she had two sons, Alexander and Henry Sedgwick Watts. She died less than eight months after the birth of her second son, on 4 December 1858. Her husband and eldest son both died in 1860, and her husband's brother became the legal guardian for the young Henry Sedgwick Watts. Henry Dwight Sedgwick II served as administrator to the several Watts estates.

Related Families

Arranged alphabetically.

Abigail Williams Sergeant Dwight (1721-1791)
The daughter of Colonel Ephraim and Elizabeth Jackson Williams of Stockbridge, Abigail was the half-sister of Ephraim Williams, the founder of Williams College. On 16 August 1739, she married John Sergeant, missionary to the Stockbridge Indians, and they had three children: John, Erastas, and Electa. After her husband's death at the age of 39 in 1749, Abigail became headmistress of the Indian girls' boarding school. In 1752, she married General Joseph Dwight, lawyer, land speculator, and former military officer of the French and Indian War. Dwight took over the management of the Indian School along with Abigail, through which the couple made considerable profit. They had two children, Pamela (who married Theodore Sedgwick) and Henry Williams Dwight. Abigail died in 1791.

Rev. James Freeman (1759-1835)
Born on 22 April 1759 to Constant and Lois Cobb Freeman, James graduated from Harvard in 1777, joined the Continental Army, and was captured at Quebec in 1780. After his release, Freeman returned to Boston to become a minister at King's Chapel. In 1785, he convinced the church membership to change their liturgy from Episcopalian to Unitarian, making King's Chapel the first Unitarian church in the United States. Freeman received a Doctorate of Divinity from Harvard in 1811 and retired from the ministry in 1826. He married Mrs. Martha Clark of Newton in 1788 and had no children. The uncle of Louisa Davis Minot, Freeman performed many marriages and baptisms for the Minot and Sedgwick families. He served as a member of Boston's first school committee and was one of the founders of the Massachusetts Historical Society. He died on 14 November 1835 in Newton, Massachusetts.

George Richards Minot (1758-1802)
The youngest son of Stephen and Sarah Clarke Minot, George was born in Boston on 22 December 1758. He received an A.B. from Harvard College in 1778 and an A.M. in 1781, when he was asked to give the valedictory address. Admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1781, he set up practice at 39 Court St. in Boston, where four generations of his descendants would also practice law. In 1792, Minot was appointed judge of probate for Suffolk County and, in 1800, judge of the Municipal Court of Boston. A founder of the Massachusetts Historical Society in 1791, he achieved recognition as a historian with his History of the Insurrections in Massachusetts in the year 1786, concerning Shays' Rebellion, published in 1788. In 1783, he married Mary Speakman, and they had three children: William, Jane, and George Richards. Minot died on 2 January 1802.

Louisa Davis Minot (1788- 1858)
Born on 10 May 1788, Louisa was the daughter of Daniel Davis, former solicitor general of Massachusetts, and Lois Freeman Davis. The oldest of thirteen children, she moved to Boston from Portland at the age of 17. She married William Minot on 29 July 1810, and they had five children: Mary, George Richards, William II, Francis, and Julia. Living on Beacon St. in Boston, Louisa served as president of the charitable Bethesda Society for more than 30 years, as well as president of the Franklin Infant School. An accomplished artist and writer, Louisa contributed children's and adult stories to many periodicals and published a popular essay on perspective. She taught drawing and painting to her friends' children and many public school teachers. She died on 21 January 1858 at the age of 70.

William Minot (1783-1873)
Born in Boston on 17 September 1783, William was the son of George Richards and Mary Speakman Minot. He graduated from Harvard with an A.B. in 1802 and an A.M. in 1805. William became a prominent Boston lawyer, specializing in trust administration and practicing for 65 years at 39 Court St., formerly the office of his father. He married Louisa Davis on 29 July 1810, with whom he had five children. William built a home at 61 Beacon St. in 1824, which survived the 1825 fire, and he later built a summer home, known as "Woodbourne," in the Forest Hills section of West Roxbury. He died on 2 June 1873 in Boston at age 89.

William Minot II (1817-1894)
See Biographical Sketches--Sedgwick Family.

Historical Collection

Arranged alphabetically.

Elias Boudinot (1740-1841)
Born in Philadelphia in 1740, Elias Boudinot served as a New Jersey delegate to the Continental Congress in 1777-1778 and again in 1781-1784. Elected president of the Continental Congress in 1783, he signed the Treaty of Paris in that capacity and served from 1789 to 1795 as a U.S. representative from New Jersey. In 1795, he was appointed director of the United States Mint, a position he held until 1805. Boudinot was also a trustee of the College of New Jersey (later Princeton University) from 1772 until his death in 1821.

John Tabor Kempe (1735-1792)
John Tabor Kempe was appointed attorney general of the Royal Province of New York in July 1759 after the death of his father, William Kempe, who had served in that capacity since 1752. During his time in office, he acquired over 163,000 acres of land in New York and New Jersey, much of which he purchased from Native Americans. He married Grace Coxe of New Jersey in 1766. A Loyalist, Kempe was accused of treason during the Revolutionary War, and his lands and property were confiscated. He returned to England in 1783, where he died in 1792.

Archibald Kennedy (ca. 1685-1763)
A descendant of Scottish peerage, Archibald Kennedy emigrated to New York about 1710. In 1722, he became collector of customs and receiver-general of the Province of New York, a position he held until his death. A successful land speculator, he purchased the property at #1 and #3 Broadway in New York City, as well as Bedlow Island, later the site of the Statue of Liberty. His 1751 pamphlet, "The Importance of Gaining and Preserving the Friendship of the Indians to the British Interest, Considered," earned him the friendship of Benjamin Franklin and helped to inspire Franklin's 1754 "Albany Plan of Union" for the North American British colonies. Kennedy had one son, Archibald Kennedy II.

Archibald Kennedy II (ca. 1723-1794)
Archibald Kennedy II joined the Royal Navy at the age of fourteen as a captain's servant, and he became a captain himself by the age of 34. Commanding the armed frigates Prince of Orange, the Halifax, and the Flamborough, he is believed to have amassed a fortune in excess of £250,000 from prize money won during the French and Indian War. He also acquired considerable land with his marriages to Katherine Schuyler and Anne Watts, by whom he had three children. Heir to his father's property as well, by the mid 1760s, he had become one of New York's largest landowners and had turned his home at #1 Broadway into what was considered by contemporaries the finest mansion in New York City. Kennedy served as the Royal Navy commander of the British blockade of New York Harbor during the Stamp Act crisis of November 1765. For failing to remove British stamps from Fort George to one of his ships, he was relieved of his command, although he was later cleared by a Royal Navy investigation. Kennedy's mansion was confiscated during the Revolutionary War and used by George Washington as his New York headquarters. Kennedy returned to England in 1781, and in 1792, upon the death of an heirless Scottish cousin, he became the 11th Earl of Cassillis.

John Morke (d. 1755)
A native of Denmark, John Morke captained the Danish vessel Sarah and Elizabeth in 1717, emigrating to Boston by the late 1720s. There he commanded the sloop Albany and the brigantine Dolphin, sailing trade routes between Boston, New York City, and Albany, New York. Morke was also the creator of a long list of inventions and proposals, which he tried unsuccessfully to market to many British colonial governors and various European countries. Among these were proposals for a floating dock for ship repair; methods for creating silver from black lead; a "scheme for the defense of America"; methods to sweeten butter, preserve timber, and dress leather; and new designs for ploughs, water pipes, and ships. He died destitute in 1755.

Sources

For further biographical information, see:

Dewey, Mary E., ed. Life and Letters of Catharine M. Sedgwick, 1871.

Kelley, Mary, ed. The Power of Her Sympathy: The Autobiography and Journal of Catharine Maria Sedgwick, 1993.

Kenslea, Timothy. The Sedgwicks in Love: Courtship Engagement and Marriage in the Early Republic, 2006.

Minot, James Jackson. Ancestors and Descendants of George Richards Minot, 1758-1802, 1936.

The Minot Family: Record of Births, Marriages and Deaths, 1754-1934. Copied from family Bibles.

Sedgwick, Hubert Merrill, comp. A Sedgwick Genealogy: Descendants of Deacon Benjamin Sedgwick. Published posthumously by the New Haven Colony Historical Society, 1961, on the Sedgwick family website, http://www.sedgwick.org/na/library/books/sed1961/sed1961.html.

Welsh, Richard E. Theodore Sedgwick, Federalist: A Political Portrait, 1965.

Collection Description

The Sedgwick family papers consist of 117 boxes and 3 oversize boxes of manuscripts and printed materials, as well as 52 manuscript and printed volumes. They are arranged in thirteen series that document the Sedgwick family of western Massachusetts and New York City from 1717 to 1946. The bulk of the collection consists of the papers of Theodore Sedgwick, a Federalist legislator and judge; his wife Pamela Dwight Sedgwick; five of their children--Theodore Sedgwick II, Henry Dwight Sedgwick, Robert Sedgwick, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, and Charles Sedgwick--and their families.

Also within the collection are the papers of families related to the Sedgwicks by marriage. Most notable are the papers of William Minot, a Boston lawyer; his wife Louisa Davis Minot; and several of their ancestors and descendants. Other parts of the collection include Sedgwick family genealogical, real estate, and financial papers, as well as historical documents collected by Theodore Sedgwick III.

Of particular significance are the papers of Theodore Sedgwick which date from 1754 to 1813 and document his career as an agent for the Continental Army, representative to the Continental Congress, member of the U.S. House of Representatives, justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, and Federalist leader. In addition to correspondence with most of the influential political leaders of his day, his papers also include family correspondence, as well as business and financial papers.

Along with Theodore Sedgwick and his wife Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, five of Sedgwick's children and their families are represented by individual series. Within these series, the papers of each child, as well as the papers of their spouses, children, and in some cases, grandchildren, are further divided into individual subseries. (To navigate the family tree, it may be helpful to reference the Sedgwick Genealogical Chart.) The subseries include extensive sets of family correspondence, personal and professional papers, literary and political writings, journals, scrapbooks, account books, and other miscellaneous papers. Although the papers of Theodore Sedgwick's daughter, author Catharine Maria Sedgwick, form a separate series of family correspondence and personal papers, her representation within this collection is relatively small.

The largest series within the collection contains the papers of the family of Henry Dwight Sedgwick and consists of 53 boxes and 5 volumes. The bulk are the papers of New York lawyer Henry Dwight Sedgwick II, consisting of 30 boxes dating from 1836 to 1904. In addition to correspondence with his wife, Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, his papers include writings and speeches, personal and business papers, financial records, and legal papers. Of particular interest are papers relating to HDS II's extensive legal work with the New York Underground Railway Company from 1871 to 1892.

Family correspondence forms the second largest series, consisting of 18 boxes spanning the years 1800 to 1946 and containing correspondence among more than 55 Sedgwick family members. Arranged chronologically except for undated correspondence, which is arranged alphabetically by author, the letters in this series document births, marriages, deaths, and other significant family occasions, and comment on political and social events in western Massachusetts, Boston, New York, Italy, and France.

The Minot family papers primarily consist of the papers of Boston attorney William Minot and his wife, artist and educator Louisa Davis Minot. Dating from 1771 to 1893, this series also includes the papers of William Minot's father, George Richards Minot; his grandfather, Stephen Minot; and his son, William Minot II. Also represented within the collection are papers of the Davis, Dwight, Freeman, Hopkins, Livingston, Pomeroy, Rackemann, Sergeant, Watts, and Williams families, as well as the papers of Fanny Kemble (Butler).

The historical document collections acquired by Theodore Sedgwick III between 1831 and 1833 form a separate series, dating from 1717 to 1815. They include the papers of Danish sea captain and inventor John Morke, New York Collector of Customs Archibald Kennedy, British Royal Navy officer Archibald Kennedy II, New York Attorneys General William Kempe and John Tabor Kempe, and Continental Congress President Elias Boudinot, as well as a 1759 orderly book from the Siege of Quebec and papers relating to Shays' Rebellion.

Acquisition Information

Gift of Alexander Sedgwick, March 1923; Elizabeth Gaskell Norton, May 1924; Mrs. Henry M. Channing, May 1924; and Charles S. Rackemann, September 1925.

Detailed Description of the Collection

I. Theodore Sedgwick papers, 1754-ca. 1915

The bulk of Theodore Sedgwick's papers date from 1768 to 1813 and are divided into the following categories: family correspondence, personal and professional correspondence, business and political papers, and bound volumes. A fifth category, commentary on Theodore Sedgwick and his papers, contains various notes and essays on TS's life and work produced from 1824 to about 1900.

A. Family correspondence, 1773-1813

Arranged chronologically by correspondent.

This subseries contains correspondence between TS and his wife, Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, exchanged primarily during TS's trips to New York and Philadelphia from 1789 to 1799. Recurring topics include the difficulties resulting from TS's frequent absences, whether TS should continue his political career, Pamela's declining physical and mental health, the health of their children, and general domestic concerns. Their letters also discuss personal and political issues such as TS's safety following Shays' Rebellion, the death of Pamela's mother Abigail Dwight, concern with their daughter Frances' interest in publisher Loring Andrews, President Washington's illness, Madison's political views, Washington's birthday celebration, and TS's description of a 1791 performance of The Taming of the Shrew.

Also included here is correspondence between TS and his children, particularly Theodore Sedgwick II, Henry Dwight Sedgwick, and Catharine Maria Sedgwick. Topics include TS II's studies at Yale, the education of sons Henry and Robert at Williams College, and their early legal practices in Stockbridge and Albany. Additional subjects of discussion were political issues of the day, Pamela Sedgwick's health, and the education and welfare of the younger children. Correspondence with TS's daughter Catharine refers to her education, relationships, and upbringing, as well as her illnesses and various domestic concerns.

Letters between TS and his children Eliza, Frances, Robert, and Charles, his daughter-in-law Susan Ridley Sedgwick, his brother John Sedgwick, and his nephew Theodore Sedgwick, as well as general letters addressed to "My Dear Children," are interfiled here in miscellaneous family correspondence.

Box 1
Theodore Sedgwick with Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, 1773-1799
Box 2Folder 1-4
Theodore Sedgwick with Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, 1800-1804
Box 2Folder 5-14
Theodore Sedgwick with Theodore Sedgwick II, 1790-1810
Box 2Folder 15-21
Theodore Sedgwick with Henry Dwight Sedgwick, 1794-1812
Box 2Folder 22-23
Theodore Sedgwick with Catharine Maria Sedgwick, 1799-1812
Box 3Folder 1-8
Miscellaneous Theodore Sedgwick family correspondence, 1776-1813

B. Personal and professional correspondence, 1768-1813

Arranged chronologically and by correspondent.

The bulk of correspondence in this subseries relates to TS's political career and includes letters from some of the most well-known political figures of the Revolutionary and early National period. These correspondents and the dates of their letters include: Alexander Hamilton, 1777-1799; Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, 1781-1791; Aaron Burr, 1781-1792; Tapping Reeve, 1785; Nathaniel Dane, 1785-1788; Caleb Strong, 1786-1801; Rufus King, 1786-1802; John Jay, 1789; Fisher Ames, 1789-1801; Gen. Phillip Schuyler, 1792; Harrison Gray Otis, 1792-1808; Daniel Dewey, 1798-1806; Chief Justice John Marshall, 1800; and Samuel Sewall, 1800-1806. Among the many topics covered are the creation and ratification of the Massachusetts constitution, congressional proceedings, Shays' Rebellion, the Constitutional Convention, plans for the creation of the federal government, choices for a seat of government, plans for the vice-presidency, the federal assumption of state debts, postal routes, Jay's Treaty, Massachusetts gubernatorial elections, U.S. relations with France, U.S. presidential elections, Federalist politics, and TS's appointment to the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

Correspondence with Thomas Dwight, 1789-1801, and Samuel Henshaw, 1788-1900, discusses issues relating to western Massachusetts, as well as national events. Dwight in particular kept TS informed about state and local politics and about local opinions of national events. TS's most extensive correspondence was with his close friends Henry and Peter Van Schaack and with his law partner Ephraim Williams. In addition to discussing political and military events on both the local and national scene, these letters also cover topics of a more personal nature. They mention the health and mental condition of TS's wife Pamela, as well as the health of his children, TS's long absences from home and his indecision about continuing to serve in political office, the care of the Van Schaacks' property during their imprisonments (they were Loyalists), and TS's anger at not receiving the appointment of Massachusetts chief justice in 1806.

Many of the letters in this subseries were collected by TS's grandson, Theodore Sedgwick III, and bound into four volumes. Although the letters have since been disbound and reorganized chronologically, the original indices to these volumes can be found in subseries E (commentary on Theodore Sedgwick and his papers).

Box 3Folder 9-14
Theodore Sedgwick with Thomas Dwight, 1789-1801
Box 3Folder 15-19
Theodore Sedgwick with Samuel Henshaw, 1788-1800
Box 3Folder 20-22
Theodore Sedgwick with Rufus King, 1786-1802
Box 3Folder 23
Letterbook, Theodore Sedgwick letters to Rufus King, 1787-1802
Box 4
Theodore Sedgwick with Henry Van Schaack, 1778-1798
Box 5Folder 1-6
Theodore Sedgwick with Henry Van Schaack, 1799-1811
Box 5Folder 7-13
Theodore Sedgwick with Peter Van Schaack, 1778-1802
Box 5Folder 14-25
Theodore Sedgwick with Ephraim Williams, 1789-1807
Box 6
Personal and professional correspondence, 1768-1796
Box 7
Personal and professional correspondence, 1797-1813

C. Business and political papers, 1754-1813

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

TS's business and professional papers are divided into three categories--legal, political, and judicial papers--which pertain to his career as a Berkshire County lawyer, as a U.S. representative and senator, and as a Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court judge; real estate and financial papers, relating primarily to TS's large land investments in Massachusetts and New York; and Continental Army supply accounts, containing his financial accounts as a contractor for the northern army during the Revolutionary War.

See also series I.B. (Theodore Sedgwick, personal and professional correspondence).

i. Legal, political, and judicial papers, 1754-1813

Included here are papers relating to TS's professional career as a lawyer, political representative, congressional leader, and judge. While many documents pertain to national political issues, others specifically concern western Massachusetts and Berkshire County. Significant documents include a copy of the "Berkshire Covenant" (1774), a petition for the arrest of Benedict Arnold (1776), articles of the Great Barrington Confederation (1779), resolutions of the bar of Berkshire and Hampshire Counties (1781), TS's appointment to the Berkshire County Court of Common Pleas (1784), a certificate of election to the United States Congress (1788), third-party correspondence concerning the treaty between the United States and Great Britain (1791), a certificate of membership to the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery (1792), a draft of a petition to President John Adams protesting the treaty with France, TS's 1798 address to his constituents, lists of Stockbridge voters by party (1800), legal judgments, writs, warrants and pleas, TS's appointment as justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts (1802), papers relating to cases he heard as a Supreme Court justice, a petition requesting that TS not retire from the bench (1806), and a copy of his will (1810).

Of particular note are a set of documents relating to TS's work in 1784 to settle the border dispute between Massachusetts and New York at the Hudson River. Included here are the original 1773 House Act, land surveys, the correspondence and reports of Major Joseph Hawley, and TS's correspondence and reports of 1784 used by Congress to ascertain the boundary.

Box 8Folder 1-22
Legal, political, and judicial papers, 1754-1813
Box 8Folder 23-27
Papers relating to N.Y./Massachusetts boundary dispute, 1773-1784
Box 9Folder 1
Description of country between Lake Erie and Ohio River, ca. 1778
Box 9Folder 2
List of duties received from Berkshire towns, 1786
Box 9Folder 3
Account of dutied items in Berkshire towns, 1789-1790
Box 9Folder 4
Opinion on Clinton/Jay election canvassing, 1792
Box 9Folder 5
Kentucky, Virginia report on Alien and Sedition Acts, ca. 1798
Box 9Folder 6
Congressional paymaster's records, 1799-1800
Box 9Folder 7
Middlesex Supreme Court cases, October term, 1810

ii. Real estate and financial papers, 1768-1813

Included here are papers relating to TS's considerable real estate investments in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, and in Ontario County, New York. They consist of land surveys; deeds; business correspondence with Joseph Webb, Samuel Otis, and William Ludlow; contracts concerning the construction of TS's Stockbridge house; lease agreements; a power of attorney for Augustus Porter to sell Ontario County lands; a statement of lands sold by Porter; and correspondence and accounts with Israel Chapin in regard to TS's New York lands.

Other financial papers include an account book between Stockbridge grocer John S. Hopkins and TS, as well as a listing of TS's outstanding notes and bonds written in the hand of his son Henry.

Box 9Folder 8-24
Real estate and financial papers, 1768-1813
Box 9Folder 25
Grocery and dry goods account book, 1795-1799
Box 9Folder 26
"Copy of Certain Notes, Bonds, etc.," 1806

iii. Continental Army supply accounts, 1775-1777

Documents found here relate to TS's position as a contractor for the northern Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. They include accounts of sheep, cattle, and flour purchased for the army in 1775-1777 and his expense account for services in 1777.

Box 9Folder 27

D. Bound volumes, 1768-1813

Arranged chronologically.

Vol. 1
Sheffield day book, 1768-1777

Account book listing clothing expenses, travel costs, cost for bushels of wheat.

Vol. 2
Great Barrington and Sheffield day book, 1770-1780

Accounts with Oliver Phelps and others, partly concerned with accounts for supplies to Continental Army.

Vol. 3
Continental Army journal/day book with Ephraim Williams, 1777-1789

The first part of this volume is an unrelated account book of Peter Lamatter (1770-1772). The second part is TS's Continental journal, containing accounts with Oliver Phelps and others (1777-1780). Part three is labeled "Day Book #3" and consists of expenses relating to TS's Stockbridge law practice with Ephraim Williams (1780-1789).

Box 9Folder 28-29
TS memorandum books, 1782-1800

Five small books containing TS's notes on planting and gardening, along with a few other household memos.

Vol. 4
Day book with Ephraim Williams, 1788-1794

Accounts relating to TS's Stockbridge law practice.

Vol. 5
Ledger of accounts with Ephraim Williams, 1789-1804

Accounts relating to TS's Stockbridge law practice, including index.

Vol. 6
Stockbridge day book, 1789-1813

Accounts relating to TS's law practice and other expenses. Also includes entries by TS's son Henry, 1808-1810, perhaps while he clerked in his father's law office.

Vol. 7
Day book with Ephraim Williams, 1794-1809

Accounts relating to Stockbridge law practice.

E. Commentary on Theodore Sedgwick and his papers, 1824-ca. 1915

Arranged topically, by author.

A number of TS's descendants have collected and commented upon his correspondence and papers. Arthur G. Sedgwick, TS's great-grandson, explained in his preface to "Letterbooks of Theodore Sedgwick" that TS's political correspondence was arranged and bound into four large volumes by Theodore Sedgwick III (Arthur's father) "and came long since into my hands. Another grandson, the late Henry Dwight Sedgwick [II], had these in his possession for several years and made notes with a view to a biography, but was prevented by interruptions and increasing age from completing his work."

Included in this subseries are the indices from the original volumes of letters bound by Theodore Sedgwick III (the letters are now found in series I.B., Theodore Sedgwick, personal and professional correspondence), alphabetically listing TS's correspondents. Also found here are the six volumes of notes and abstracts compiled by Henry Dwight Sedgwick II in preparation for writing a biography of TS. The first four volumes consist of notes taken on the letterbooks. Volumes 5 and 6 include notes from TS's papers, letters to his wife Pamela, congressional proceedings, and various 17th-century documents.

The notes and commentary entitled "Letterbooks of Theodore Sedgwick," by Arthur G. Sedgwick, consists of transcribed letters from TS's letterbooks, as well as letters and writings from other collections, related third-party correspondence, and independent commentary. It is arranged by individual topics that TS confronted during his congressional career. Arthur Sedgwick's detailed transcriptions, notes on sources, and research on topics and events--clearly intended as background for a biography of TS--is an excellent source for researchers.

Also included here is a biographical sketch of TS written by his son Henry Dwight Sedgwick, intended for publication by an encyclopedia, and extracts from an address, delivered by William Sullivan to the Suffolk County bar in 1824, that memorializes TS.

i. Notes and abstracts by Henry D. Sedgwick II, ca. 1900

Vol. 8-13

ii. "Letterbooks of Theodore Sedgwick," by Arthur G. Sedgwick, ca. 1915

Box 10Folder 1
Chapters 1 & 2
Box 10Folder 2
"Political Last Will and Testament of Theodore Sedgwick"
Box 10Folder 3-4
1st Congress, miscellaneous topics
Box 10Folder 5
"Public Credit"
Box 10Folder 6
"Assumption of State Debt"
Box 10Folder 7
"Permanent Seat of Government"
Box 10Folder 8
"Excise in the 1st Congress"
Box 10Folder 9
"Bank of the United States"
Box 10Folder 10
2nd Congress, miscellaneous topics
Box 10Folder 11
3rd Congress, miscellaneous topics
Box 10Folder 12
"Whiskey Rebellion"
Box 10Folder 13
"Neutralization"
Box 10Folder 14
"Madison's Resolutions"
Box 10Folder 15
"Jay's Treaty"
Box 10Folder 16-17
4th Congress, miscellaneous topics
Box 10Folder 18-20
Letter transcripts
Box 10Folder 21
Transcribed sources
Box 10Folder 22-28
Notes and memoranda

iii. Notes and letterbook indices by Theodore Sedgwick III, ca.1858

Box 10Folder 29

iv. Biographical sketch by Henry Dwight Sedgwick, n.d.

Box 10Folder 30

v. Extracts from address to the Suffolk bar, 1824

Box 10Folder 31

II. Pamela Dwight Sedgwick correspondence, 1767-1807

This series contains the correspondence of Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, the wife of Theodore Sedgwick. It has been divided into two subseries: family correspondence, which includes letters with her mother and children; and personal correspondence, containing letters with Pamela's friends and acquaintances.

A. Pamela Sedgwick family correspondence, 1767-1807

Arranged chronologically.

The bulk of letters in this section consists of correspondence between Pamela and her mother, Abigail Williams Dwight, discussing Pamela's engagement and marriage to Theodore Sedgwick, domestic matters, and Abigail's social schedule. Other correspondence includes letters from Pamela's children Frances, Henry, Robert, and Charles, in which they discuss their daily activities and travels. Many of these letters were written when Catharine, Henry, and Robert were living together in Boston (1805).

For additional family correspondence with Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, see also series I.A. (Theodore Sedgwick papers, family correspondence) and series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick papers, family correspondence).

Box 11Folder 1-2

B. Pamela Sedgwick personal correspondence, 1771-1804

Arranged chronologically.

Included here are letters between Pamela and her friends Sally Ingersoll, Elizabeth Hopkins, Susan Kemper, and Sarah Tucker. Although her correspondence with Elizabeth (Betsy) Mayhew spans several decades, the majority of letters date from 1788-1789 and discuss difficulties with Pamela's daughter Eliza, then 14, who came to stay with Elizabeth in Boston to learn more about city life. Other topics in Pamela's personal correspondence include her reaction to her mother's death, her health problems, and her difficulties with her husband's long absences.

Box 11Folder 3-5

III. Theodore Sedgwick II family papers, 1800-1911

This series consists primarily of the papers of Theodore Sedgwick II (TS II), son of Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick; Susan Ridley Sedgwick, the wife of TS II; and Theodore Sedgwick III (TS III), the son of TS II and Susan Ridley Sedgwick. Also found here are smaller collections of papers relating to other TS II descendants, including TS II's daughter Maria Banyer Sedgwick, TS III's wife Sara Ashburner Sedgwick, and TS III's children Arthur George Sedgwick and Sarah Sedgwick Norton.

To view a genealogical chart of the Sedgwick family, click here.

A. Theodore Sedgwick II papers, 1800-1841

Arranged chronologically by category.

The papers of TS II are divided into three sections: family correspondence, consisting of TS II's letters with his wife, Susan Ridley Sedgwick, and with his brother, Henry Dwight Sedgwick; personal and professional papers; and TS II's 1835 draft of Public and Private Economy.

i. TS II family correspondence, 1800-1839

This section contains letters to TS II from his wife, Susan Ridley Sedgwick, discussing domestic matters such as their children's health and education, weather, gardening, and visits with friends and family. A few also touch upon Susan's writing career and her opinions on religion and politics. Also found here is TS II's extensive correspondence with his younger brother, Henry Dwight Sedgwick. Topics include: TS II's advice to Henry when the latter was attending Williams College (1800-1804); descriptions of TS II's law practice in Albany, New York; efforts to publish sister Catharine Maria Sedgwick's book A New England Tale (1822); and correspondence about investments in the Rhode Island Coal Company (1827).

For additional family correspondence with Theodore Sedgwick II, see series I.A. (Theodore Sedgwick I papers, family correspondence), series III.C. (Theodore Sedgwick III papers), series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick papers), and series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 11Folder 6-11
TS II with Susan Ridley Sedgwick, 1821-1839
Box 11Folder 12-25
TS II with Henry Dwight Sedgwick, 1800-1824
Box 12Folder 1-2
TS II with Henry Dwight Sedgwick, 1827-1830

ii. TS II personal and professional papers, 1803-1841

Included in this section is TS II's correspondence with his law partner Harmanus Bleecker, as well as with Nathan Appleton, Martin Van Buren, Rufus King, Harrison Gray Otis, Mark Hopkins, Josiah Quincy, Jr., and Edward Everett. Also included here are a series of account books and ledgers. Volume 14, kept from 1803-1823, contains family accounts that appear to be from the settlement of the estate of TS II's father. The front of this volume is an unrelated account book of Russell Forsyth and Co., druggist. The 1840 memorial to TS II was written in Rome by a person identified only as an acquaintance of more than thirty years.

Box 12Folder 3-21
Personal and professional papers, 1805-1839
Vol. 14
Account book, 1803-1823
Box 12Folder 22
Assessments of Stockbridge minister's tax, 1809
Box 12Folder 23
Grocery account book, 1816-1818
Box 12Folder 24
Account ledgers #1 and #2, 1839-1841
Box 12Folder 25
Memorial for Theodore Sedgwick II, 1840

iii. TS II draft of Public and Private Economy, 1835

Among TS II's papers is a handwritten draft of his most well-known work, Public and Private Economy, published in 1836. According to its introduction, "the object of this book is to show the value and uses of property and wealth, and how it may be acquired."

Box 12Folder 26-30
Draft of Public and Private Economy, 1835
Box 13Folder 1-10
Draft of Public and Private Economy, 1835

B. Susan Ridley Sedgwick papers, 1819-1866

Arranged chronologically.

This subseries contains the papers of Susan Livingston Ridley Sedgwick, the wife of TS II. It includes Susan's correspondence with Harmanus Bleecker, her husband's law partner, and with friends Anna Bridger, Madame G.W. Lafayette, Sarah Ashburner, and several unidentified correspondents. It also includes a few poems written by Susan, a receipt, and an extract from her 1866 will.

For family correspondence with Susan Ridley Sedgwick, see series I.A. (Theodore Sedgwick, family correspondence), series III.A. (Theodore Sedgwick II papers), series III.C. (Theodore Sedgwick III papers), series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick family correspondence), and series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence). See also her memorial to her son, "In Memory of Theodore Sedgwick," in series III.C. (Theodore Sedgwick III papers).

Box 13Folder 11-12

C. Theodore Sedgwick III papers, 1821-1865

Arranged chronologically and by category.

The papers of TS III are divided into five categories: family correspondence, consisting of letters between TS III and his parents; personal and professional papers; writings; volumes, including letterbooks, journals, and scrapbooks; and the 1865 manuscript "In Memory of Theodore Sedgwick," written by TS III's mother Susan Ridley Sedgwick.

See also series XII (historical collections), the bulk of which are documents collected by Theodore Sedgwick III.

i. TS III family correspondence, 1821-1858

Included here is TS III's correspondence with his parents, TS II and Susan Ridley Sedgwick, the bulk of which dates from his time in France as the American attaché (1833-1834). Topics include: observations about French life and culture; descriptions of Paris, Le Havre, and the court of Louis Phillipe; a visit to the family of the Marquis de Lafayette; and the French railway system.

For additional family correspondence with Theodore Sedgwick III, see series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 13Folder 13-28
TS III with parents, 1821-1832
Box 14Folder 1-6
TS III with parents, 1833-1858

ii. TS III personal and professional papers, 1826-1858

Among these papers are a statement by TS III regarding his dismissal from the Round Hill School in 1826, various law licenses, powers of attorney, certificates of membership, and TS III's appointment as district attorney for the southern district of New York (1858). The bulk of the papers concern TS III's assumption of his uncle Robert Sedgwick's legal practice after Robert was incapacitated in 1839, and the settling of Robert's estate from 1841 to 1842.

See also series V.A. (Robert Sedgwick papers, papers relating to estate settlement).

Box 14Folder 7-28
Personal and professional papers, 1826-1846
Box 15Folder 1-5
Personal and professional papers, 1847-1858
Box 15Folder 6
Passport, 1850

iii. TS III writings, 1830-1847

Papers found here include both literary and legal writings of TS III. Among them are several copies of a poem written to the Duke of Cornwall; an unpublished literary manuscript, "The Diamond of New Oxford," concerning the oppression of French Protestants; notes for his acclaimed legal text Treatise on the Measure of Damages (1847); and several legal essays and published speeches.

See also series I.E. (commentary on Theodore Sedgwick and his papers) for TS III's notes and letterbook indices.

Box 15Folder 7
Miscellaneous writings, 1842-1847
Box 15Folder 8
"The Diamond of New Oxford," 1830
Box 15Folder 9
"Memorandum on Constitutional Reform," 1843

iv. TS III volumes, 1821-1858

Included here are a series of seven letterbooks containing copies of letters written by TS III to business associates, personal acquaintances, and family members. Some volumes are indexed. Recipients include Peter Van Schaack, Harmanus Bleecker, Jared Sparks, Daniel Webster, John C. Hamilton, William C. Bryant, Fanny Kemble (Butler), Orville Dewey, Edward Everett, General Lafayette, Martin Van Buren, Edward Livingston, William Leggett, John Dix, and various members of the Sedgwick, Pomeroy, and Watts families. The letterbooks contain information on TS III's political views, his active collection of historical documents, his observations on France, and his political columns written for the New York Evening Post. Volume 19, the 1857 letterbook, also contains letters written to Theodore, as well as news clippings chronicling the political upheaval surrounding his nomination as U.S. district attorney for the southern district of New York.

Also found here is a series of journals and scrapbooks kept by TS III, primarily recording his travels. Most notable is his documentation of his 1833-1834 trip to France, consisting of a three-volume journal and a scrapbook containing letters, passports, bills, advertisements, calling cards, and programs from theaters and museums. Of additional interest are TS III's journals from his European trips of 1851 and 1855, which contain news clippings, programs, articles on history and architecture, and maps of the British railroads and various cities in France.

a. Letterbooks, 1829-1858

Vol. 15
Letterbook, Oct. 1829-Apr. 1831
Vol. 16
Letterbook, Apr. 1831-Jan. 1833
Vol. 17
Letterbook, Jan.-Apr. 1833
Box 15Folder 10
Letterbook (Paris), June 1833-May 1834
Box 15Folder 11
Letterbook, July-Sep. 1834
Vol. 18
Letterbook (New York), Oct. 1834-Aug. 1835
Vol. 19
Letterbook, 1857
Box 15Folder 12
News clippings removed from vol. 19, 1857-1858

b. Journals, commonplace-books, and scrapbooks, 1821-1855

Box 15Folder 13
"Journal of Trip to Niagara," 1821
Vol. 20
"Epitome of the History of New York," 1828-1830
Vol. 21
Commonplace-book and memoranda, 1829-1830
Box 15Folder 14
"Journal of Trip to France," June-Aug. 1833
Vol. 22
Paris journal, volume 1, June-Aug. 1833
Vol. 23
Paris journal, volume 2, Aug.-Nov. 1833
Vol. 24
Paris journal, volume 3, Nov. 1833-July 1834
Vol. 25
Paris scrapbook, May 1833-Apr. 1834
Vol. 26
Journal of trip to Europe, May-Oct. 1836
Vol. 27
Journal of trip to Virginia, July-Aug. 1841
Vol. 28
Journal of trip to Europe, Oct. 1850-Feb. 1851
Vol. 29
Journal and commonplace-book--Europe, 1851
Vol. 30
Journal and commonplace-book--Europe, 1855
Box 15Folder 15
Items removed from vols. 22, 29, and 30, 1833-1855

v. "In Memory of Theodore Sedgwick," 1865

This manuscript was compiled by TS III's mother, Susan Ridley Sedgwick, six years after his death. It consists of an autobiographical and genealogical essay written by TS III, a narrative of TS III's life written by Susan Ridley Sedgwick, and excerpts from letters, journals, and other sources. The manuscript provides a detailed portrait of TS III's family life and of his time in France during 1833 and 1834.

Box 15Folder 16-22

D. Papers of other Theodore Sedgwick II descendants, 1830-1911

Arranged chronologically by family member.

This subseries contains papers relating to the sister, wife, and children of Theodore Sedgwick III. Included in the correspondence of Maria Banyer Sedgwick are letters to William Ellery and Harmanus Bleecker. Arthur George Sedgwick's papers include: correspondence with grammar school and college classmates; Harvard College exams, class rankings and Class Day programs (1861-1864); papers relating to his service as a lieutenant in the U.S. Army and as a prisoner of war (1864); admission to Harvard Law School; and correspondence and receipts relating to his publications in The Nation and North American Review.

For all family members listed below, see also series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 15Folder 23
Maria Banyer Sedgwick correspondence, 1830-1846
Box 15Folder 24
Sara Ashburner Sedgwick correspondence, 1832-1833
Box 16Folder 1-12
Arthur George Sedgwick papers, 1856-1911
Box 16Folder 13
Sarah Sedgwick Norton papers, 1908

IV. Henry Dwight Sedgwick family papers, 1802-1946

This series consists of the papers of Henry Dwight Sedgwick (HDS), the son of Theodore Pamela Dwight Sedgwick; Jane Minot Sedgwick, the wife of HDS; and their children Jane Minot Sedgwick II and Henry Dwight Sedgwick II. Also found here are the papers of HDS II's sons Theodore Sedgwick IV and Alexander Sedgwick, as well as those of Alexander's wife, Lydia Rogers Sedgwick. It also contains several smaller collections of papers relating to the sisters, children, and grandchildren of Henry Dwight Sedgwick II.

The bulk of this section, which forms the largest series in the collection, are the papers of Henry Dwight Sedgwick II, dating from 1836 to 1904.

To view a genealogical chart of the Sedgwick family, click here.

A. Henry Dwight Sedgwick papers, 1802-1831

The papers of Henry Dwight Sedgwick date from 1802 to 1831 and are divided into three categories: family correspondence; personal and professional papers, which form the bulk of this subseries; and writings.

i. HDS family correspondence, 1805-1831

Arranged chronologically by correspondent.

Included here is HDS's correspondence with his brothers Robert and Charles, his wife Jane, and his brother-in-law William Minot. Henry's letters to Robert, to whom he was closest in age, discuss their alternating law clerking experiences in Stockbridge and Albany, their social situations, and their relationships with women. This correspondence later documents the business controversy and resulting arbitration between them, which HDS pursued in the early stages of his mental illness against the wishes of his family. With his younger brother Charles, HDS discusses both national and local political events, social relationships, the health of their father, family finances, and his disputes with family members during his illness. Also found here is HDS's extensive correspondence with Jane Minot during their engagement from 1816-1817, which includes their plans for marriage and their future life. HDS's deteriorating mental health, beginning about 1828, is also in evidence within these letters.

For additional correspondence with HDS, see series I.A. (Theodore Sedgwick papers, family correspondence), series II.A. (Pamela Dwight Sedgwick papers), series III.A. (Theodore Sedgwick II papers), series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick family correspondence), and series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 16Folder 14-24
HDS with Robert Sedgwick, 1806-1821
Box 17Folder 1-3
HDS with Robert Sedgwick, 1822-1831
Box 17Folder 4-13
HDS with Charles Sedgwick, 1805-1831
Box 17Folder 14-29
HDS with Jane Minot Sedgwick, 1816-1831
Box 18Folder 1-13
HDS with William Minot, 1816-1831

ii. HDS personal and professional papers, 1802-1831

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

Papers found here include correspondence with Samuel How, Harmanus Bleecker, Timothy Woodbridge, Henry Dwight, Josiah Dwight, Daniel Dewey, Ephraim Williams, William Appleton, Jared Sparks, William Jarvis, and Walter Channing, as well as an extensive series of letters with Margaret Channing in 1813.

Other papers consist of HDS's Williams College diploma, legal documents relating to various cases, accounts, receipts, deeds, HDS's appointments as justice of the peace, papers concerning the estate of his father, Theodore Sedgwick I, HDS's will, his marriage settlement with Jane Minot, pew deeds, accounts with William Minot and Theodore Sedgwick II, memos concerning the legal dispute between HDS and his brother Robert Sedgwick, notes from his doctors, and an 1828 letter of Harrison Gray Otis, who accompanies HDS to the McLean Asylum.

Among HDS's law school papers are notes taken on a series of lectures delivered by Judge Tapping Reeve and James Gould when HDS attended their Litchfield law school in July-August 1807. Other legal papers are drafts of documents and notes on court cases, taken, most likely, when he served as a law clerk.

Papers relating to the Rhode Island Coal Company and the steamboat Chancellor Livingston chronicle HDS's ill-fated investments in great detail. They include acts of incorporation, committee reports, stock certificates, an "Address to the Inhabitants of Rhode Island about the subject of their Coal Mines," board of directors meeting minutes, correspondence, insurance papers, and printed circulars.

Here also are papers relating to HDS's legal case against Rufus Wyman and the McLean Asylum and their treatment of his mental illness. They consist of notes and memos, correspondence, and HDS's narrative of the case, written almost daily from August to November 1830.

Box 18Folder 14-26
Personal and professional papers, 1802-May 1811
Box 19
Personal and professional papers, June 1811-1814
Box 20
Personal and professional papers, 1815-1821
Box 21
Personal and professional papers, 1822-1831
Box 22Folder 1-6
Legal notes, n.d.
Box 22Folder 7
Law school notes, 1804-1807
Box 22Folder 8
Commonplace-book, ca. 1810-1812
Box 22Folder 9-12
Minutes, Supreme Judicial Court, 1813-1815
Box 22Folder 13
Private expense book, 1820-1821
Box 22Folder 14-21
Papers relating to Rhode Island Coal Co., 1809-1827
Box 22Folder 22
Papers relating to ship Chancellor Livingston, 1828
Box 23Folder 1-14
Papers relating to case against Rufus Wyman, 1830-1831

iii. HDS writings, 1802-1821

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

HDS's writings include a variety of speeches, essays, drafts of articles intended for publication, and notes on political and religious topics. Also found here are his 1803 debate notes for the Philotechnian Society, a debating club at Williams College, and HDS's commencement speech delivered at Williams College in 1805, entitled "A Comparison between Common Sense and Its Converse."

Box 23Folder 15
Speeches, n.d.
Box 23Folder 16-17
Political writings, n.d.
Box 23Folder 18
Writings on slavery, n.d.
Box 23Folder 19-22
Notes relating to "An Appeal for Justice to the Poor," n.d.
Box 23Folder 23-26
Writings on tariffs, n.d.
Box 23Folder 27
Writings on the embargo, n.d.
Box 24Folder 1-3
Miscellaneous notes and essays, n.d.
Box 24Folder 4
Miscellaneous notes and essays, 1802-1805
Box 24Folder 5-6
Notes for Williams College debates, 1803-1804
Box 24Folder 7
Williams College speech, 1804
Box 24Folder 8
Pittsfield July 4th speech, 1808
Box 24Folder 9
Boston Benevolent Society speech, 1812
Box 24Folder 10
Essay on legal authority, 1821

B. Jane Minot Sedgwick papers, 1805-1871

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

The papers of Jane Minot Sedgwick, the wife of Henry Dwight Sedgwick, date from 1805 to 1871, with the bulk between 1810 and 1859. They have been divided into three sections: family correspondence, personal papers, and volumes.

i. Jane Minot Sedgwick family correspondence, 1805-1859

Arranged chronologically and by correspondent.

Included here is Jane's correspondence with her son Henry Dwight Sedgwick II, discussing his early education and years at Harvard College, concerns with HDS II's health, family news, the death of HDS II's friend John Emory, and HDS II's time in Europe in 1846-1847. Correspondence between Jane and her brother William Minot begins in childhood and covers their respective marriages, family news and events, the death of Jane's husband HDS, and family financial affairs. Jane's correspondence with her sister-in-law, Louisa Davis Minot, discusses educational and artistic interests, visits with friends, concerns over the mental condition of HDS and Louisa's trip to see him at the asylum, and the Minots' trip to Charleston and Savannah.

Jane's correspondence also appears in series IV.A. (Henry Dwight Sedgwick, family correspondence), series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick family correspondence), and series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 24Folder 11-28
Jane Minot Sedgwick with HDS II, n.d.
Box 25Folder 1-19
Jane Minot Sedgwick with HDS II, n.d.
Box 25Folder 20-23
Jane Minot Sedgwick with HDS II, 1839-1840
Box 26Folder 1-17
Jane Minot Sedgwick with HDS II, 1841-1858
Box 26Folder 18-22
Jane Minot Sedgwick with William Minot I, n.d.
Box 27Folder 1-14
Jane Minot Sedgwick with William Minot I, 1805-1859
Box 27Folder 15-24
Jane Minot Sedgwick with Louisa Davis Minot, n.d.
Box 28Folder 1-22
Jane Minot Sedgwick with Louisa Davis Minot, n.d.
Box 28Folder 23-24
Jane Minot Sedgwick with Louisa Davis Minot, 1816-1818
Box 29Folder 1-16
Jane Minot Sedgwick with Louisa Davis Minot, 1819-1856

ii. Jane Minot Sedgwick personal papers, 1810-1871

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

Jane's personal papers include correspondence with her many friends, particularly Harriett Davidson Field, Caroline Danforth, and Lucy Russell. Correspondence with Fanny Kemble (Butler), Gaetano Castillia, and Harriett Martineau is also found here. By 1829, Jane's papers clearly illustrate her efforts to handle the family's business and financial needs in the face of her husband's growing mental incapacity. Included in her correspondence are letters to HDS's business associates explaining his inability to work and letters from HDS's doctor discussing his condition. Her financial papers include accounts with her brother William Minot, tuition receipts, deeds and indentures, insurance papers, and copies of her will. Also found here is a coroner's report on HDS and essays by Jane about her husband's character and the history of his "disease."

Box 29Folder 17-24
Personal correspondence, n.d.
Box 30Folder 1-12
Personal correspondence, 1810-1857
Box 30Folder 13-21
Legal and financial papers, 1810-1871
Box 30Folder 22
Papers relating to illness of Henry D. Sedgwick, 1831-1832
Box 30Folder 23
Writings, n.d., 1814

iii. Jane Minot Sedgwick volumes, 1806-1859

Arranged chronologically.

This section contains a letterbook, journals, and commonplace-books kept by Jane Minot Sedgwick from 1806 to 1859. Of particular note are two journals written by Jane in her middle years. Beginning her 1833-1837 journal with "I have now been a widow seventeen months," she chronicles her children's health and development; visits from friends, including William Ellery Channing and Harriet Martineau; travels; and deaths in the family. A second journal begins in 1841 upon the death of her daughter Louisa. In it, she reminisces about her daughter's life, the history of her family, and her husband's illness.

Vol. 31
Letterbook, 1806-1841
Box 30Folder 24
Journal of trip to Canada, July-Aug. 1815
Box 30Folder 25
Journal, 1833-1837
Box 30Folder 26
Journal, 1841-1849
Box 31Folder 1-5
Commonplace-book, 1810-1815
Vol. 32
Commonplace-book, 1817-1859

C. Jane Minot Sedgwick II papers, 1834-1893

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

This subseries contains the papers of Jane Minot Sedgwick II, the daughter of Henry Dwight and Jane Minot Sedgwick. It consists of correspondence between Jane and her friend Mary ("Cheerie") Langtree, who influenced her to join the Catholic church in 1853, as well as correspondence with her friends Mary and Charles O'Sullivan and with Bishop O'Reilly of Springfield. Also included here are religious notebooks written in English, Italian, French, and Latin, primarily containing Jane's notes taken at the time she converted to Catholicism, in addition to printed catechisms and devotionals. A large portion of Jane's papers involve her relationship with the Catholic church, and they include papal blessings for the Catholic school she founded in West Stockbridge, mortgage deeds and insurance policies for the school, and West Stockbridge parish account books.

Many of Jane's personal papers are financial documents related to the inheritance she received from her mother, including accounts with her cousin William Minot II and papers concerning the Spring Lane estate. Here also are multiple versions of Jane's will from 1870 to 1886. Jane's numerous commonplace-books and account books contain sporadic dated entries, memos, and reflections, as well as miscellaneous household expenses.

For family correspondence with Jane Minot Sedgwick II, see series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

i. Jane Minot Sedgwick II personal papers, 1842-1893

Box 32Folder 1-3
Jane M. Sedgwick II correspondence with Mary Langtree, n.d.
Box 32Folder 4-5
Jane M. Sedgwick II correspondence with Mary O'Sullivan, n.d.
Box 32Folder 6-8
Personal correspondence, n.d.
Box 32Folder 9-19
Religious papers, n.d.
Box 32Folder 20-23
Miscellaneous papers, n.d.
Box 32Folder 24-29
Personal papers, 1842-1875
Box 33Folder 1-19
Personal papers, 1876-1893

ii. Volumes, 1834-1888

Box 33Folder 20
Commonplace-book, 1834-1849
Box 33Folder 21
Commonplace-book, 1862-1877
Box 33Folder 22
Commonplace-book, 1867
Box 33Folder 23
Commonplace-book, 1867-1868
Box 33Folder 24
Loose papers from commonplace-books, 1842-1867
Box 34Folder 1
Commonplace-book, ca. 1881
Box 34Folder 2
Commonplace-book, ca. 1884
Box 34Folder 3
Parish account book, ca. 1865-1877
Box 34Folder 4
Checkbook, 1887-1888
Box 34Folder 5
Account book, May-Oct. 1888
Box 34Folder 6-8
Account books, 1888

D. Henry Dwight Sedgwick II papers, 1836-1904

The papers of Henry Dwight Sedgwick II, the son of Henry Dwight and Jane Minot Sedgwick, form the largest single collection within the Sedgwick family papers. They are divided into six sections: correspondence with Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, personal and business papers, financial records, legal papers, writings, and volumes.

i. HDS II correspondence with Henrietta E. Sedgwick, 1857-1892

Arranged chronologically.

Correspondence between HDS II and his wife (and first cousin) Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick consists of almost 1,500 letters spanning 35 years of their engagement and marriage. Necessitated by long separations when Henry worked in New York City and Henrietta raised their children in Stockbridge, the letters chronicle virtually every aspect of their domestic life. Addressing each other as "Jas" (short for "Jasper") and "Netta," their witty and affectionate letters decrease by the mid-1870s.

For additional family correspondence with Henry Dwight Sedgwick II, see also series IV.B. (Jane Minot Sedgwick papers), series IV.F. (Alexander Sedgwick papers), and series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 34Folder 9-27
HDS II with Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, n.d.
Box 35Folder 1-6
HDS II with Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, n.d.
Box 35Folder 7-30
HDS II with Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, 1857-Feb. 1865
Box 36
HDS II with Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, Mar. 1865-1870
Box 37
HDS II with Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, 1871-1876
Box 38Folder 1-22
HDS II with Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, 1877-1892

ii. HDS II personal and business papers, 1836-1904

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

This section consists primarily of correspondence between HDS II and his Harvard classmates, friends, and business associates. Included are the letters of Frank G. Child, Leavitt Hunt, Fanny Kemble (Butler), William C. Bryant, Elizabeth Peabody, William Everett, Henry H. Edes, Edward Everett Hale, and George Hoar. Also found here are papers relating to: Harvard College, including HDS II's admission papers, HDS II's diploma (1843), club regulations, and exhibitions; HDS II's 1846 European trip; an 1860 ball in honor of the Prince of Wales, for which HDS II served on the General Committee; letters of introduction to Washington D.C. dignitaries; the administration of the University Club and Union League Club (1879-1880); various wills of HDS II (1884, 1902); the renovation of the Stockbridge family mansion (1884-1887); the Stockbridge Casino, of which HDS II was president; the Laurel Hill Society, one of the country's first village improvement societies that HDS II helped to found; and responses to HDS II's "Reminiscences" (1894) and "Sketch of Robert Sedgwick" (1896).

Also included are papers relating to R.J. Roberts, who was accused by HDS II of perpetrating the "Roberts Robbery," cheating him over the course of many years out of over $90,000. Here also are papers relating to the Orah Mining Company, a silver mining operation in Joplin, Missouri, formed by HDS II with W.C. Proudfoot in 1887. They consist of correspondence, deeds for mining lots, articles of association, public relations booklets and maps, and accounts.

For papers specifically relating to the legal career of HDS II, see subseries iv below. For additional papers relating to HDS II's Harvard years, including disciplinary action taken against him, see series X.C. (William Minot, personal and professional papers). See also series I.E. (commentary on Theodore Sedgwick and his papers) for HDS II's notes and abstracts of TS's letterbooks (ca. 1900).

Box 38Folder 23-25
HDS II correspondence, n. d
Box 39Folder 1-5
HDS II correspondence, n.d.
Box 39Folder 6-7
HDS II correspondence with Fanny Coster, n.d.
Box 39Folder 8-10
Lists of persons and property, n.d.
Box 39Folder 11
Miscellaneous notes, n.d.
Box 39Folder 12-30
Personal and business papers, 1836-1860
Box 40
Personal and business papers, 1861-1881
Box 41
Personal and business papers, 1882-1895
Box 42Folder 1-16
Personal and business papers, 1896-1904
Box 42Folder 17-23
Papers relating to Orah Mining Co., 1886-1899

iii. HDS II financial records, 1839-1904

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

Included here are records of HDS II's expenses for clothing, college tuition, his travels to Europe, books, subscriptions, transportation, liquor, cigars, plumbers, bakeries, coal, tailors, groceries, and apothecaries. This section also includes HDS II's expenses for real estate maintenance and repair, both on his own investment properties and on those that he managed for others in Yonkers and Manhattan.

Box 42Folder 24-31
Accounts and receipts, 1839-1861
Box 43
Accounts and receipts, 1862-1895
Box 44Folder 1-14
Accounts and receipts, 1896-1904
Box 44Folder 15-26
Gallatin Bank checks, 1875-1884
Box 45Folder 1-12
Gallatin Bank checks, 1885-1902
Box 45Folder 13
Union Trust Co. check, 1884-1903
Box 45Folder 14
Union Trust Co. bankbook, 1885-1890
Box 45Folder 15-17
Financial accounts and summaries, 1867-1901
Box 45Folder 18
Deeds and indentures, 1869-1898
Box 45Folder 19-21
Insurance policies, 1874-1891
Box 46Folder 1
Accounts with James Silkman, 1878
Box 46Folder 2-20
Accounts with White and Sons, 1887-1903

iv. HDS II legal papers, 1840-1900

HDS II was a partner in the law firm of Storrs and Sedgwick, 34 Wall St., New York City, until about 1860, when he began a solo practice. From about 1893 to 1900, as he spent more time in Stockbridge, he shared his New York practice with his son Henry Dwight Sedgwick III. In some of the legal cases dating from that time, it is unclear which HDS served as lead counsel, and often both names appear on correspondence and court documents.

a. Correspondence and miscellaneous papers, 1845-1900

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

This section consists almost entirely of legal correspondence, primarily from HDS II's years with Storrs and Sedgwick. It includes what appears to be a disbound letterbook and the index to that volume. It also contains legal notes, moot practice cases from Harvard Law School, and miscellaneous real estate papers.

See also volume 33, Storrs and Sedgwick letterbook.

Box 46Folder 21-24
Legal correspondence, n .d.
Box 46Folder 25
Storrs and Sedgwick letterbook index, n.d.
Box 47Folder 1-11
Legal notes, n.d.
Box 47Folder 12-26
Legal papers, 1845-July 1858
Box 48Folder 1-12
Legal papers, Aug. 1858-1900

b. Legal cases, 1840-1900

Arranged alphabetically by case.

Included in this section are papers relating to various legal cases handled by HDS II over the course of his career. These cases, many of which were tried before the New York State Supreme Court, primarily concern contract and estate law. Several later cases, such as the murder trial People v. Pasquale Doti (1894) and Church of the Holy Apostles v. New York Elevated Railroad Co. (1897), list HDS III as legal counsel, although notes and legal documents are in the hand of HDS II.

Several of the cases found here are related to the estates of Sedgwick family members. The Averill estate case concerns the estate of Julia Pomeroy Averill (daughter of Eliza Sedgwick Pomeroy); the Bristed trust case concerns the trust established by Charles Astor Bristed for his wife, Grace Sedgwick Bristed; and the Watts estate case deals with the estates of both Alexander and Henry Sedgwick Watts, the widower and son of Frances Sedgwick Watts. Also of note are papers relating to the MacKaye case, which deal extensively with divorce law and women's property rights in 19th-century New York.

Box 48Folder 13
Adirondack Club, 1890
Box 48Folder 14
Anathan and Co., 1893
Box 48Folder 15
Atkinson/Mullany, 1890-1891
Box 48Folder 16-33
Averill estate, 1869-1894
Box 49Folder 1
Lt. E. B. Barry, 1881-1883
Box 49Folder 2-3
Beardslee Nickel and Manufacturing Co., 1872
Box 49Folder 4
Franz Blatzheim deed, 1887-1889
Box 49Folder 5-11
Benjamin v. MacKenzie, 1881-1890
Box 49Folder 12
Eliza Blunt probate, 1892
Box 49Folder 13
Gottfried Borger will, 1891
Box 49Folder 14-31
Bristed trust, 1871-1894
Box 50Folder 1-9
Butler v. Sedgwick, 1886-1887
Box 50Folder 10-11
Church of the Holy Apostles, 1897
Box 50Folder 12-16
Pasquale Doti, 1894-1895
Box 50Folder 17
William Floyd-Jones agreement, 1888-1889
Box 50Folder 18
Robert Fountain petition, 1883
Box 50Folder 19
Fred and Elizabeth Goddard wills, 1890-1891
Box 50Folder 20
Howe case, 1882-1885
Box 50Folder 21
Hunter v. Central Railroad of New Jersey, 1874
Box 50Folder 22
Knickerbocker Ice Co. v. Sophronia Pierce, 1880-1885
Box 50Folder 23
Langley estate, 1892-1893
Box 51Folder 1-30
MacKaye case, 1860-1890
Box 52Folder 1-14
MacKaye case, 1891-1894
Box 52Folder 15
Cristobal Madan, 1869-1897
Box 52Folder 16
Parker v. Simmons, 1884-1886
Box 52Folder 17-19
Rackemann/Morse, 1892-1894
Box 52Folder 20
Richards v. Westcott, 1860
Box 52Folder 21-25
Richey v. Gahrens, 1887-1890
Box 52Folder 26-33
Sherwood v. Pierce, 1883-1884
Box 53Folder 1-2
Constance Spence, 1883-1885
Box 53Folder 3-5
Spence v. Condon, 1887-1889
Box 53Folder 6-17
Spence v. Griswold, 1886-1900
Box 53Folder 18
Stuart v. Griswold, 1888-1889
Box 53Folder 19-27
Timpson v. Mitchell, 1855-1872
Box 54Folder 1-12
Timpson v. Mitchell, 1873-1890
Box 54Folder 13-26
Watts estate, 1840-1899

c. Society for the Employment and Relief of Poor Women, 1873-1894

Arranged chronologically.

Papers in this section relate to the Society for the Employment and Relief for Poor Women, a New York organization founded in 1844 that provided sewing work for poor or infirm women or for women who needed to stay at home to care for their children. HDS II acted as the attorney and a trustee for the organization at the time of their legal incorporation as a charity in 1874. The records contain court documents, correspondence, annual reports, and financial accounts.

Box 55Folder 1-13

d. New York Underground Railway Co., 1871-1892

Arranged chronologically and by record type.

The New York City Central Underground Railway Co. was chartered in May 1869 but was foreclosed by the New York Superior Court in 1876. Many of the railway's charter rights and much of its property were transferred to Origen Vandenburgh, a creditor, who with others formed the New York Underground Railway Co. in 1880. HDS II became the company's attorney in 1886 in a series of legal actions against the New York Arcade Railway Co. and the commissioners of the City of New York, some of which were held before the New York State Supreme Court. The resulting papers compiled for legal research thoroughly document the history of the New York City subway system. They include legal briefs, arguments, statements, summons, complaints, copies of original charters, History of the Underground Railroad Charters, by H.D. Sedgwick and Nelson J. Waterbury (1886), mortgage certificates, indentures, maps, legal correspondence, and stock reports.

Box 55Folder 14-24
Notes and memoranda, n.d.
Box 55Folder 25
Drafts, fragments of briefs, n.d.
Box 55Folder 26-27
Motions and briefs, n.d.
Box 56Folder 1-14
Motions and briefs, n.d.
Box 56Folder 15-23
Papers relating to railway, 1871-Sep. 1885
Box 57Folder 1-24
Papers relating to railway, Oct. 1885-Sep. 1888
Box 58Folder 1-23
Papers relating to railway, Oct. 1888-Feb. 1891
Box 59Folder 1-7
Papers relating to railway, Mar. 1891-July 1892
Box 59Folder 8
News clippings, n.d.-1891
Box 59Folder 9-24
Printed materials, n.d., 1876-1886
Box 60Folder 1-21
Printed materials, 1886-1890
Box 61Folder 1-7
Printed materials, 1890-1891

v. HDS II writings, 1842-1899

Arranged chronologically by type of writing.

Writings in this section include speeches made by HDS II to various social and civic organizations, including the Laurel Hill Association, the Hasty Pudding Club, the Century Club, the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, and the Harvard chapter of Alpha Delta Phi. Topics include the need for a water supply for Stockbridge, Stockbridge during the Civil War, woman's suffrage, religion, Abraham Lincoln, and comparisons between town and country life. Many of his speeches also commemorated events such as New Year's, Decoration Day, and July Fourth.

HDS II's poetry includes patriotic verse, a class poem delivered in College Chapel in 1843, a poem delivered before the Hasty Pudding Club, "Number One," which was published by the New York Tribune, and poems in honor of his Harvard class reunion.

Numerous college essays are found here, including debate topics, historical, ethical, and literary subjects. Also included are drafts or printed versions of many of HDS II's published essays, including "Relation and Duty of the Lawyer to the State," delivered before the Law School of the City University of New York, "Reminiscences of a Literary Life," published in Century (1894), and "Robert Sedgwick: A Sketch," published by the Colonial Society (1896).

Many of HDS II's writings relate to religious issues, including notes on scripture and other readings, the history of the church and the papacy, and philosophical questions such as proof of divine origin and the role of the clergy. Other notes and writings cover his opinions of village improvements, historical research, the slave trade and the annexation of Texas, and the Civil War.

a. Speeches, 1842-1896

Box 61Folder 8-27
Speeches, n.d.
Box 62Folder 1-6
Speeches, n.d.
Box 62Folder 7
College speeches, ca. 1842
Box 62Folder 8
Draft, speech to Laurel Hill Association, 1890
Box 62Folder 9
New Year's speech, 1896

b. Poetry, 1843-1899

Box 62Folder 10-14
Poetry, n.d.
Box 62Folder 15
Class poem, 1843
Box 62Folder 16
Poetry, 1894-1899

c. Essays, 1842-1896

Box 62Folder 17-21
Essays, n.d.
Box 62Folder 22-30
College essays, ca. 1842
Box 62Folder 31
Draft, "Agrippa and the Christian Examiner," 1857
Box 62Folder 32-33
"The Relation and Duty of the Lawyer to the State," 1872
Box 63Folder 1-2
"The Layman's Demand on the Ministry," 1880
Box 63Folder 3
Draft, "On the Death of President Garfield," 1881
Box 63Folder 4
Draft, "Reminiscences of a Literary Life," 1894
Box 63Folder 5
"Robert Sedgwick: A Sketch," 1896

d. Religious writings and notes, n.d.

Box 63Folder 6-16

e. Miscellaneous notes, n.d.

Box 63Folder 17-21

vi. HDS II volumes, 1846-1895

Arranged chronologically.

Volumes found here include expense books and diaries kept by HDS II during his trip to Europe in 1846-1847, several diaries written after his return to New York in 1848 (including a portion written in French), and numerous later pocket diaries and day books, most with only sporadic entries. Also in this section is a copy of a speech written by HDS for the dedication of a Stockbridge Civil War monument and a letterbook of Storrs and Sedgwick legal correspondence, written in 1860-1861.

Box 63Folder 22
Stockbridge speech, n.d.
Box 63Folder 23
Expense book, Nov. 1846- July 1847
Box 63Folder 24
Expense book, Aug.-Oct. 1847
Box 63Folder 25
Diary--trip to London, Sep. 1847
Box 63Folder 26
Diary, Oct. 1847-Jan. 1848
Box 63Folder 27
Items found in diaries, 1846-1848
Box 64Folder 1
Pocket diary, Jan.-Mar. 1848
Box 64Folder 2
Almanac diary, 1855
Vol. 33
Letterbook, Storrs and Sedgwick, 1860-1861
Box 64Folder 3
Pocket diary, 1862
Vol. 34
Pocket diary, 1863
Vol. 35
Pocket diary, 1867
Box 64Folder 4
Pocket diary, 1869
Box 64Folder 5
Grocer's account book, 1895

E. Theodore Sedgwick IV papers, 1874-1901

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

This subseries contains the papers of Theodore Sedgwick IV, the son of Henry Dwight Sedgwick II and Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick. It consists almost entirely of papers from TS IV's school days at Bishop's College School in Lennoxville, Quebec (1879), Adams Academy in Quincy (1880-1882), and Harvard College (1883-1886). The papers include: school records; numerous "cards of approbation" given for good behavior; and Harvard papers, including report cards, tuition bills, Class Day programs, student directories, and lists of classes. Bills from TS IV's European trip in the summer of 1884 are also included here, as are the papers that he held as treasurer of various clubs and fraternities at Harvard, consisting of checks, account books, and receipts.

For family correspondence with Theodore Sedgwick, see series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence). See also Theodore Sedgwick Diaries, 1884-1950. OFFSITE STORAGE. The collection guide to the diaries can be viewed here.

i. Personal papers, 1874-1901

Box 64Folder 6-21

ii. Club papers, 1878-1886

Box 65Folder 1-5
Jones Club receipts, 1878-1886
Box 65Folder 6-7
Delta Kappa Epsilon receipts, 1883-1884
Box 65Folder 8
Delta Kappa Epsilon bank checks, 1883-1885
Box 65Folder 9
Delta Kappa Epsilon checkbook, 1883-1884
Box 65Folder 10
Alpha Delta Phi receipts, 1886
Box 65Folder 11-12
Alpha Delta Phi account books, 1885-1886
Box 65Folder 13
Alpha Delta Phi purveyors' account book, 1885

F. Alexander Sedgwick papers, 1880-1929

Arranged chronologically by subject.

The papers of Alexander ("Aleck") Sedgwick include correspondence with his parents Henry Dwight Sedgwick II and Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, predominantly during his time at Bishop's College School in Lennoxville, Quebec (1884), and in California (1887-1888). They primarily discuss his schoolwork and his delicate health. Later correspondence concerns his relationship and marriage to Lydia Cameron Rogers.

Other papers in this section include Alexander's speeches (many undated) concerning President Wilson, woman's suffrage, prohibition, Stockbridge commemorations, and remarks for the Laurel Hill Association, of which he was president. Also found here is personal correspondence, including letters of congratulation for Aleck's election to the state legislature in 1911; financial correspondence regarding stocks, contracts, and the purchase of a Scripps Booth roadster; a series of Stockbridge bank checks; and a 1902 account book containing a property inventory, stocks, mortgages, and dividend income for Alexander and his wife. An 1880 pocket diary contains only a few entries for January.

For additional family correspondence with Alexander Sedgwick, see series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

i. Correspondence with parents, 1884-1899

Box 65Folder 14-27
Correspondence, 1884-June 1888
Box 66Folder 1-15
Correspondence, July 1888-1899

ii. Personal papers, 1884-1929

Box 66Folder 16-20
Writings and speeches, 1914-1924
Box 66Folder 21-24
Miscellaneous papers, 1884-1912
Box 67Folder 1-6
Miscellaneous papers, 1914-1929
Box 67Folder 7-22
Bank checks, 1910-1912

iii. Volumes, 1880-1903

Box 67Folder 23
Diary, 1880
Vol. 36
Account book, 1902-1903

G. Lydia Rogers Sedgwick papers, 1905-1934

Arranged chronologically by subject.

Contained within this small subseries are the papers of Lydia "Lily" Sedgwick, the wife of Alexander Sedgwick. It includes correspondence with her son William Ellery Sedgwick, letters from friends, bank receipts, a memorial to Ellen Rogers, and condolence letters on the death of her husband Alexander.

For additional family correspondence with Lydia Rogers Sedgwick, see series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 67Folder 24-33
Lydia Sedgwick with William Ellery Sedgwick, 1905-1922
Box 68Folder 1-15
Lydia Sedgwick with William Ellery Sedgwick, 1923-1929
Box 68Folder 16-17
Papers, 1916-1934

H. Papers of other Henry Dwight Sedgwick descendants, 1834-1946

Arranged chronologically by family member.

This subseries includes the papers of HDS's daughters Frances Sedgwick Watts and Louisa Minot Sedgwick; HDS II's children Jane Sedgwick Ricciardi, Henry Dwight Sedgwick III, and Ellery Sedgwick; and Alexander Sedgwick's children William Ellery Sedgwick, Christiana Sedgwick Marquand, and Alexander Sedgwick II.

Of particular note are the papers of Henry Dwight Sedgwick III, which contain report cards and other documents relating to his school days at Adams Academy in Quincy, Massachusetts; legal correspondence and papers; a 1914 address given at Groton School; and a poem authored by HDS III for his Harvard College 40th reunion (1922). Christiana Sedgwick Marquand's papers consist primarily of letters and postcards from her trip to Europe in the summer of 1914. The papers of Alexander "Shan" Sedgwick II include correspondence with his Harvard classmates (1918-1919), as well as letters to the Associated Press bureau chief in London concerning the political situation in Greece (1934), written by Shan in his capacity as a new correspondent.

For all family members listed below, see also series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence). For papers relating to Henry Dwight Sedgwick III, see also series IV.D.iv. (HDS II legal papers). For papers relating to Ellery Sedgwick, see also the separate MHS collection of Ellery Sedgwick papers, Ms. N-854.

Box 68Folder 18
Frances Sedgwick Watts writings, n.d., 1834
Box 68Folder 19
Louisa Minot Sedgwick papers, ca. 1837
Box 68Folder 20
Jane Sedgwick Ricciardi papers, 1880-1913
Box 68Folder 21-23
Henry Dwight Sedgwick III papers, 1875-1922

See also Henry Dwight Sedgwick III and Robert Minturn Sedgwick papers, 1820-1976. Ms. N-2330. The collection guide may be viewed here.

Box 68Folder 24
Ellery Sedgwick papers, 1894-1946
Box 68Folder 25
William Ellery Sedgwick papers, 1918
Box 68Folder 26-27
Christiana Sedgwick Marquand papers, 1914-1922
Box 69Folder 1-4
Alexander Sedgwick II papers, 1918-1934

V. Robert Sedgwick family papers, 1799-1895

This series consists primarily of the papers of Robert Sedgwick, the son of Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick; Robert's wife, Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick; and their children William Ellery Sedgwick, Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, and Katherine Sedgwick Valerio. Also found here are smaller collections of papers relating to other descendants of Robert Sedgwick, including daughters Elizabeth Sedgwick Child, Susan Sedgwick Butler, Helen Sedgwick, and granddaughter Natalie Sedgwick.

To view a genealogical chart of the Sedgwick family, click here.

A. Robert Sedgwick papers, 1803-1862

The papers of Robert Sedgwick were produced from 1803 to 1862, with the bulk from 1803 to 1841. They are divided into three categories: correspondence with Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, personal and professional papers, and volumes.

i. Robert Sedgwick correspondence with Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, 1822-1837

Arranged chronologically.

This section contains correspondence between Robert Sedgwick and his wife, Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, dating from 1822 to 1837. It primarily discusses domestic issues, family news, travel details, and information about their children.

For additional family correspondence with Robert Sedgwick, see series I.A. (Theodore Sedgwick family correspondence), series IV.A. (Henry Dwight Sedgwick papers), series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick family correspondence), and series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 69Folder 5-23
Robert Sedgwick with Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, 1822-1828
Box 70Folder 1-19
Robert Sedgwick with Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, 1829-1837

ii. Robert Sedgwick personal and professional papers, 1803-1862

Arranged chronologically and by topic.

Papers in this section contain Robert's Williams College essays, documents relating to his legal career in New York City, and papers that illustrate his accumulation of investment property in New York City and Illinois. These include property maps of land owned on 22nd, 23rd, and 26th streets in New York City, mortgages, title abstracts, insurance policies, accounts with the Bank of New York, accounts with real estate brokers Nevins and Townsend, and maps of Robert's Chicago land, divided into 158 lots. This section also contains mortgages relating to investments held by Robert's brothers and sisters, apparently managed by Robert, and an 1839 memo written by Robert to his nephew and law partner Theodore Sedgwick III with instructions for carrying out his private and business affairs during his illness.

Many documents dating after 1839 were compiled to settle Robert's estate, including inventories of household items and property. (Although Robert lived until 1841, his estate was apparently put in trust after his stroke in 1839.) Other estate settlement papers are largely accounts compiled by TS III and Charles Sedgwick to settle debts, collect mortgage payments, determine property ownership, and establish trusts for Robert's children and other family members. Among these papers is a detailed 1842 memorandum written by TS III outlining the events leading up to his assumption of Robert's business and his reasons for the division of the estate. Also found here are accounts of Edward T. Channing and TS III against the estate, tax documents, bills, and receipts.

For additional papers concerning Robert's estate settlement and the family controversy it caused, see series III.C. (Theodore Sedgwick III, personal and professional papers); series VII.A. (Charles Sedgwick, personal and professional papers), series VIII.B. (family correspondence) for 1841-1845, and series IX.B. (miscellaneous Sedgwick family papers, real estate and financial papers, family financial accounts).

Box 70Folder 20-21
Personal and professional papers, 1803-1812
Box 71Folder 1-24
Personal and professional papers, 1813-1841
Box 71Folder 25
Bank checks, Dec. 1838-Apr. 1839
Box 71Folder 26-27
Papers relating to settlement of estate, 1839-1841
Box 72Folder 1-10
Papers relating to settlement of estate, 1842-1862

iii. Robert Sedgwick volumes, 1814-1840

Arranged chronologically.

In this section are volumes relating to Robert Sedgwick's personal accounts, including: an 1823 family account book listing accounts for groceries, parties, wood, and flour; expense account volumes listing furniture purchased and daily expenses; a series of private ledgers listing detailed accounts with various merchants, doctors, and family members; check registers; and a cash book. Here also are account books of clients for whom Robert managed trusts, property, or estates.

a. Personal accounts, 1814-1840

Box 72Folder 11
Family account book, 1823
Vol. 37
Expense account, 1814-1829
Vol. 38
Expense account, 1823-1831
Vol. 39
Private ledger, 1824-1839
Vol. 40
Private ledger, 1831-1840
Vol. 41
Check register, Bank of New York, 1834-1839
Box 72Folder 12
Cash book, 1836-1839

b. Professional accounts, 1816-1838

Vol. 42
Account book, estate of T. M. Rogers, 1816-1838
Box 72Folder 13
Account book, estate of William Cairns, 1823-1834
Box 72Folder 14
Account book, estate of William Cairns, 1824-1830
Box 72Folder 15
Account book with Daniel Lord, 1825-1826

B. Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick papers, 1799-1862

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

The papers of Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, the wife of Robert Sedgwick, date from 1799 to 1862, with the bulk written between 1810 and 1859. They are divided into three sections: family correspondence, personal papers, and volumes.

i. Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick family correspondence, 1810-1859

Included here is Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick's correspondence with her sister Harriett Ellery, her father William Ellery of Newport, Rhode Island, and her son William Ellery Sedgwick.

For additional family correspondence with Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, see also series V.A. (Robert Sedgwick papers), series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick family correspondence), and series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 72Folder 16-18
Elizabeth E. Sedgwick with Harriett Ellery, 1822-1823
Box 72Folder 19-27
Elizabeth E. Sedgwick with William Ellery, 1810-1833
Box 73Folder 1-4
Elizabeth E. Sedgwick with William Ellery, 1834-1836
Box 73Folder 5-24
Elizabeth E. Sedgwick with William Ellery Sedgwick, 1829-1859

ii. Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick personal papers, 1815-1862

Papers in this section include Elizabeth's correspondence with Rhoda (Mrs. Ogden) Edwards, S.E. Abbott, Elizabeth Shaw Burge, Lucy Russell, Elizabeth Perkins, and her cousins Richard Henry Dana, Sr., and Edward T. Channing. After 1840, Elizabeth's papers reflect her growing involvement with the family business after her husband Robert was incapacitated. They include mortgages, accounts, bond interest, leases, court documents, schedules of stocks and mortgages, and lists of personal expenses. Numerous receipts, primarily from 1843-1846, indicate the detailed record of her expenditures that Elizabeth kept as she drew income from her husband's unsettled estate.

Box 73Folder 25-30
Personal papers, 1815-1816
Box 74Folder 1-6
Personal papers, 1817-1862
Box 74Folder 7-18
Receipts, 1843-1856

iii. Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick volumes, 1799-1844

Volumes in this section include a recipe book that, although begun in 1799, is written largely in Elizabeth's hand. It contains recipes for medicine, as well as food. Also found in this section is Elizabeth's diary of her 1833 trip to Virginia. More than a daybook, it contains detailed descriptions and observations of the people and countryside. Four account books for the period 1840-1844 pertain to the allowance Elizabeth drew from her husband's estate before it was settled. Finally, a family account book details her expenses, along with those of each of her seven children for 1843.

Box 74Folder 19
Recipe book, 1799
Box 74Folder 20
Diary of trip to Virginia, 1833
Vol. 43
Account book #1, 1840-1841
Vol. 44
Account book #2, 1841-1842
Vol. 45
Account book #3, 1842-1843
Vol. 46
Account book #4, 1843-1844
Box 74Folder 21
Account of family expenses, 1843

C. William Ellery Sedgwick papers, 1832-1873

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

This subseries contains the papers of William Ellery Sedgwick (WES), the son of Robert and Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick. Included here is WES's correspondence with a large group of his college classmates (Harvard, 1846) and other friends, who refer to him as "Ellery" or, more commonly, "Sedg." Among them are Endicott (Tott) Peabody, Frank Minot, Jack Stearns, Thomas Rodman, B.C. Whitman, James Morris, Augustus (Gus) Heard, C.W. Wellington, Edward Binks, and Daniel Curtis. Taken together, these letters present a witty and detailed glimpse into the lives of Harvard students and their early careers in the 1840s and 1850s.

Most significant is WES's correspondence with Francis J. Child, his classmate and later brother-in-law. Nicknamed "Pais" by WES, Child discusses his studies and professorship at Harvard, relationships with family and friends, European travel, and his courtship and marriage to WES's sister Elizabeth. Also in this section are papers relating to WES's guardianship of William Holden, miscellaneous school papers, and an 1873 obituary of WES.

For family correspondence with William Ellery Sedgwick, see series V.B. (Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick papers) and series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 74Folder 22-30
WES correspondence with Francis J. Child, 1847-1851
Box 75Folder 1-12
WES correspondence with Francis J. Child, 1852-1861
Box 75Folder 13-27
Personal correspondence, 1843-1850
Box 76Folder 1-14
Personal correspondence, 1851-1863
Box 76Folder 15-17
Papers relating to guardianship of William Holden, 1860-1862
Box 76Folder 18
Miscellaneous papers, 1832-1873

D. Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick papers, 1845-1895

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

Contained in this section are the papers of Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, the daughter of Robert and Elizabeth Sedgwick, and the wife of Henry Dwight Sedgwick II, Henrietta's first cousin. Dating from 1845 to 1895, they consist of personal correspondence with her friends Susan C. Laurence, Alison Turnbull Laurence, Caroline Turnbull Laurence, Meta Brevoort, Elizabeth (Mammy) Royce, and Charlotte Binney. Other papers include receipts, a Valentine's Day poem, and an 1888 mortgage agreement between Henrietta and her husband, in which she loans him $9,000.

For family correspondence with Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, see series IV.D. (Henry Dwight Sedgwick II papers), series IV.F. (Alexander Sedgwick papers), and series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 76Folder 19-23
HES correspondence with Alison and Caroline Laurence, n.d.
Box 76Folder 24-27
Personal correspondence, 1845-1884
Box 77Folder 1-11
Personal correspondence, 1887-1895
Box 77Folder 12
Miscellaneous papers, 1846-1883

E. Katherine Sedgwick Valerio papers, 1877-1890

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

The papers of Katherine Sedgwick Valerio, the daughter of Robert and Elizabeth Sedgwick, date from 1877 to 1890 and are divided into three categories: personal papers, writings, and volumes. The bulk of Katherine's papers consists of correspondence with her former nanny Elizabeth (Mammy) Royce, as well as with her friend Lilly Doane. Also found here are programs from Katherine's formal recitations, promotional pieces, and critiques. Her writings include both signed and unsigned manuscripts of plays and dialogues, some of which are incomplete. Katherine's 1883-1884 travel diary and commonplace-book relates to her trip to Florence, Italy.

For family correspondence with Katherine Sedgwick Valerio, see series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

i. Personal papers, 1877-1890

Box 77Folder 13-15

ii. Writings, n.d.

Box 77Folder 16
Manuscript, "Atonement," n.d.
Box 77Folder 17-18
Manuscript, "Bozen," n.d.
Box 77Folder 19
Manuscript, "The Count and Countess in Connecticut," n.d.
Box 77Folder 20
Manuscript, "A Disappointment," n.d.
Box 77Folder 21
Manuscript, "The Gridiron," n.d.
Box 77Folder 22
Manuscript, "The Magpie," n.d.
Box 77Folder 23
Manuscript, "Perhaps," n.d.
Box 77Folder 24-25
Manuscripts, "Segato, the Artist," n.d.
Box 77Folder 26
Manuscript, "Through Rough Ways Unto the Stars," n.d.
Box 77Folder 27
Italian manuscript, n.d.
Box 78Folder 1-2
Manuscript fragments, n.d.

iii. Volumes, 1883-1884

Box 78Folder 3
Travel diary/commonplace-book, 1883-1884

F. Papers of other Robert Sedgwick descendants, 1840-1894

Arranged chronologically by family member.

This subseries contains the papers of Robert and Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick's daughters Elizabeth Sedgwick Child, Susan Sedgwick Butler, and Helen Sedgwick, as well as those of their granddaughter Natalie Sedgwick.

The papers of Elizabeth Sedgwick Child include a typewritten memoir, "Remembrances of Henry Dwight Sedgwick," in which Elizabeth recounts her childhood memories with her cousin HDS II. Also found here are papers relating to the New York forgery case involving Elizabeth and her future husband, Francis J. Child.

Susan Sedgwick Butler's papers consist of astronomy notes, poetry, and correspondence with friends. Also included here is a letter to the congregation of St. Paul's Church in Stockbridge upon its completion, written by Susan's widower Charles E. Butler (Butler had the church built in 1883 as a memorial to Susan).

Also found in this subseries are the papers of Natalie Sedgwick, including correspondence, receipts, and check stubs, and the 1850 correspondence of Helen Sedgwick, who died in 1857 at age 20.

For family correspondence with the family members listed below, see series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence). For family correspondence with Elizabeth Sedgwick Child, see also series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 78Folder 4-6
Elizabeth Sedgwick Child papers, 1842-1854
Box 78Folder 7
Susan Sedgwick Butler papers, 1840-1884
Box 78Folder 8
Helen Sedgwick correspondence, 1850
Box 78Folder 9-11
Natalie Sedgwick papers, 1890-1894

VI. Catharine Maria Sedgwick papers, 1802-1866

This series contains the papers of Catharine Maria Sedgwick, the daughter of Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick. They date from 1802 to 1866 and are organized into two sections: family correspondence and personal papers.

See also the Catharine Maria Sedgwick papers at the Massachusetts Historical Society (Ms. N-852, P-354) for the bulk of her correspondence, journals, writings, and other papers. See the collection guide to the microfilm edition here.

A. Family correspondence, 1802-1866

Arranged chronologically and by correspondent.

The bulk of Catharine Maria Sedgwick's family correspondence is with her brothers Robert and Charles Sedgwick, who wrote regularly to Catharine throughout their adult lives. Included in her correspondence with Charles is his 1829 epitaph for Mumbet, the Sedgwick family's domestic servant. Many of Charles's letters found here contain Catharine's penciled notations, which appear to be editorial instructions preparing the letters for publication.

This subseries also contains family correspondence between Catharine and her mother, Pamela Dwight Sedgwick; with her sister and brother-in-law, Thaddeus and Eliza Pomeroy, and their daughter Frances Susan Pomeroy; with her sister Frances Watson and Frances' children Catherine and Robert; with her brother Theodore II, his wife Susan, and their son Theodore III; with her brother Henry and his wife Jane; with her sister-in-law Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick and niece Elizabeth Sedgwick Child; with her sister-in-law Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick and her favorite niece and namesake, Katherine Sedgwick Minot. It also includes correspondence with the Minot family, including her niece's husband, William Minot II, his parents, William and Louisa Davis Minot, and several of their children.

Topics covered within Catherine's family correspondence include her childhood, her reaction to her father's death, the family's concern for Catharine's sister Frances in her abusive marriage, the support and encouragement of her family for her writing, negotiations with Harper Publishing, and the critical reception of her novels and short stories.

For additional family correspondence with Catharine Maria Sedgwick, see also series I.A. (Theodore Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 78Folder 12-23
CMS with Robert Sedgwick, 1807-1838
Box 78Folder 24-30
CMS with Charles Sedgwick, 1806-1826
Box 79Folder 1-20
CMS with Charles Sedgwick, 1827-1855
Box 79Folder 21-30
Miscellaneous family correspondence, 1802-1826
Box 80Folder 1-19
Miscellaneous family correspondence, 1827-1866

B. Personal papers, 1820-1865

Arranged chronologically.

The bulk of Catharine's personal papers consist of correspondence with friends, including Lucy Russell, Fanny Kemble (Butler), Gaetano Castillia, Eliza Follen, Sophia Pickman, Anna Murphy Jameson, William Ellery Channing, and Harriet Martineau. Also included here are a tribute to her sister Eliza, a manuscript essay entitled "God's Omnipresence" addressed to "my dear children," miscellaneous notes for editing letters, and brief business accounts from 1820-1826.

Box 80Folder 20-25

VII. Charles Sedgwick family papers, 1812-1889

This series consists primarily of the papers of Charles Sedgwick, son of Theodore and Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, and Charles's wife, Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick. Also found here are smaller collections of papers relating to Charles and Elizabeth's children Katherine Sedgwick Minot, Elizabeth Sedgwick Rackemann, William Dwight Sedgwick, and Grace Sedgwick Bristed. The papers of Katherine Minot's children, Alice Woodbourne Minot, and William Minot III are also located here.

To view a genealogical chart of the Sedgwick family, click here.

See also the Charles Sedgwick papers at the Massachusetts Historical Society (Ms. N-853) for additional correspondence, personal papers, and business papers of Charles Sedgwick, Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, and their descendants.

A. Charles Sedgwick papers, 1812-1856

Charles Sedgwick's papers date from 1812 to 1856 and are arranged into two sections: family correspondence and personal and professional papers.

i. Family correspondence, 1819-1856

Arranged chronologically and by correspondent.

This subseries contains correspondence between Charles Sedgwick and his wife, Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, as well as between Charles and his daughter, Katherine Sedgwick Minot. Topics include domestic issues and relationships, their Boston and West Roxbury homes, family celebrations and events, the suicide of their son Charles in 1841, the death of their son William during the Civil War, and the boarding school run by Elizabeth. Many of Charles' letters contain editorial notes in the hand of his sister Catharine Maria Sedgwick, who prepared them for publication following his death.

For additional family correspondence with Charles Sedgwick, see also series I.A. (Theodore Sedgwick family correspondence), series IV.A. (Henry Dwight Sedgwick papers), series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick family correspondence), and series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 81Folder 1-15
Charles Sedgwick with Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, 1819-1856
Box 81Folder 16-30
Charles Sedgwick with Katherine Sedgwick Minot, 1834-1851
Box 82Folder 1-5
Charles Sedgwick with Katherine Sedgwick Minot, 1852-1856

ii. Personal and professional papers, 1812-1856

Arranged chronologically.

Charles's personal and professional papers include correspondence with Fanny Kemble (Butler), Rev. Cyrus Byington of the Choctaw Nation in Arkansas, Mr. Scott of Scott's Weekly Paper in Philadelphia, and a letter acknowledging receipt of the Resolution of the Berkshire Bar. Other papers in this section are a poem from Charles's granddaughter Posey and a table of mortality from Lenox, Massachusetts.

Box 82Folder 6-12

B. Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick papers, 1828-1863

Arranged chronologically.

This subseries contains the papers of Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, the wife of Charles Sedgwick, dating from 1828 to 1863. They include Elizabeth's correspondence with her daughter Katherine Maria Sedgwick (Minot) primarily concerning family and domestic issues, particularly the deaths of Katherine's brothers Charles and William, Katherine's marriage to William Minot II, and the lives of Katherine's children. Elizabeth's personal correspondence includes letters from Fanny Kemble (Butler) and another unidentified friend.

For additional family correspondence with Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, see also series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick, family correspondence) and series VII.A. (Charles Sedgwick papers).

i. Family correspondence, 1828-1863

Box 82Folder 13-28
EDS with Katherine Sedgwick Minot, 1828-1843
Box 83Folder 1-24
EDS with Katherine Sedgwick Minot, 1844-1863

ii. Personal correspondence, 1859-1862

Box 83Folder 25

C. Papers of Charles Sedgwick descendants, 1831-1889

Arranged chronologically by correspondent.

This subseries contains papers relating to the descendants of Charles and Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, specifically their children Katherine Sedgwick Minot, Elizabeth Sedgwick Rackemann, William Dwight Sedgwick, and Grace Sedgwick Bristed, as well as Katherine's children Alice Woodbourne Minot and William Minot III.

The bulk of Katherine Sedgwick Minot's papers consists of correspondence with Fanny Kemble (Butler). Katherine's papers also include two poems written for her by her aunt Susan Ridley Sedgwick on her birthday. Papers of other descendants also include letters from Fanny Kemble (Butler), Gaetano Castillia, and several unidentified correspondents.

For family correspondence with persons represented in this subseries, see series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence). For additional correspondence with Katherine Sedgwick Minot, see series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick family correspondence), series VII.A. (Charles Sedgwick papers), and series VII.B. (Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick papers).

Box 83AFolder 1-4
Katherine Sedgwick Minot papers, 1831-1879
Box 83AFolder 5
Alice Woodbourne Minot papers, 1868-1882
Box 83AFolder 6
William Minot III papers, 1869
Box 83AFolder 7
Elizabeth Sedgwick Rackemann papers, 1840-1873
Box 83AFolder 8
William Dwight Sedgwick papers, 1859
Box 83AFolder 9
Grace Sedgwick Bristed papers, 1874-1889

For additional papers relating to Grace Sedgwick Bristed, see series IV.D.iv. (HDS II legal papers, Bristed Trust), which includes information about the 1884 fire at her Stockbridge home and an inventory of her property.

VIII. Sedgwick family correspondence, 1800-1946

This series contains both dated and undated Sedgwick family correspondence, written from 1800 to 1946. With the exceptions of Theodore Sedgwick, Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, and Catharine Maria Sedgwick, whose family correspondence is contained within their individual series, all other Sedgwick family members mentioned in this collection are represented here.

The bulk of the Sedgwick family correspondence, both dated and undated, is that of Henry Dwight Sedgwick II and his family, including the later correspondence of HDS II's son Alexander and his family. In addition to the family members listed in the undated correspondence, the dated correspondence includes letters written by Thaddeus Pomeroy, Ebenezer Watson, William Minot, Louisa Davis Minot, and William Ellery to Sedgwick family members.

While some correspondence discusses national events, as well as political, social, and cultural activities in Stockbridge, Boston, and New York City, the bulk of the letters in this series concern family issues. Subjects include births, marriages, deaths, family finances, childrearing, health of various family members, and visits among the family. For a more detailed guide to the topics covered in family correspondence and their approximate dates, see the Timeline of Sedgwick Family Events.

Extensive sets of correspondence between individual family members have been arranged separately and are found within each family series. These include:

Alexander Sedgwick with parents (series IV.F.)
Catharine Maria Sedgwick with Charles Sedgwick (series VI.A.)
Catharine Maria Sedgwick family correspondence (series VI.A.)
Catharine Maria Sedgwick with Robert Sedgwick (series VI.A.)
Catherine Maria Sedgwick with Theodore Sedgwick (series I.A.)
Charles Sedgwick with Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick (series VII.A.)
Charles Sedgwick with Katherine Sedgwick Minot (series VII.A.)
Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick with William Ellery Sedgwick (series V.B.)
Henry Dwight Sedgwick with Charles Sedgwick (series IV.A.)
Henry Dwight Sedgwick with Jane Minot Sedgwick (series IV.A.)
Henry Dwight Sedgwick with Robert Sedgwick (series IV.A.)
Henry Dwight Sedgwick with William Minot (series IV.A.)
Henry Dwight Sedgwick II with Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick (series IV.D.)
Jane Minot Sedgwick with Henry Dwight Sedgwick II (series IV.B.)
Jane Minot Sedgwick with Louisa Davis Minot (series IV.B.)
Jane Minot Sedgwick with William Minot (series IV.B.)
Lydia Rogers Sedgwick with William Ellery Sedgwick II (series IV.G.)
Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, family correspondence (series II.A.)
Robert Sedgwick with Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick (series V.A.)
Theodore Sedgwick with Catharine Maria Sedgwick (series I.A.)
Theodore Sedgwick with Henry Dwight Sedgwick (series I.A.)
Theodore Sedgwick with Pamela Dwight Sedgwick (series I.A.)
Theodore Sedgwick with Theodore Sedgwick II (series I.A.)
Theodore Sedgwick II with Henry Dwight Sedgwick (series III.A.)
Theodore Sedgwick II with Susan Ridley Sedgwick (series III.A.)
Theodore Sedgwick III with parents (series III.C.)

A. Undated family correspondence

Arranged alphabetically by correspondent.

Box 84Folder 1
Grace Sedgwick Bristed
Box 84Folder 2-7
Susan Sedgwick Butler
Box 84Folder 8-12
Elizabeth Sedgwick Child
Box 84Folder 13
Francis J. Child
Box 84Folder 14
Laura Sedgwick James
Box 84Folder 15
Christiana Sedgwick Marquand
Box 84Folder 16
John Marquand
Box 84Folder 17
Frank Minot
Box 84Folder 18
Harriett Jackson Minot
Box 84Folder 19
Julia Minot
Box 84Folder 20
Katherine Sedgwick Minot
Box 84Folder 21
Louisa Sedgwick Minot
Box 84Folder 22
Mary Minot
Box 84Folder 23
William Minot II
Box 84Folder 24
Eliza Sedgwick Pomeroy
Box 84Folder 25-29
Elizabeth Sedgwick Rackemann
Box 84Folder 30
Jane Sedgwick Ricciardi
Box 85Folder 1
Alexander Sedgwick
Box 85Folder 2
Alexander Cameron Sedgwick
Box 85Folder 3
Arthur G. Sedgwick
Box 85Folder 4-5
Charles Sedgwick
Box 85Folder 6
Constance Brevoort Sedgwick
Box 85Folder 7
Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick
Box 85Folder 8-10
Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick
Box 85Folder 11
Helen Ellery Sedgwick
Box 85Folder 12-14
Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick
Box 85Folder 15
Henry Dwight Sedgwick I
Box 85Folder 16-19
Henry Dwight Sedgwick II
Box 85Folder 20-24
Henry Dwight Sedgwick III
Box 85Folder 25
Henry Dwight Sedgwick IV
Box 85Folder 26-31
Jane Minot Sedgwick I
Box 86Folder 1-4
Jane Minot Sedgwick II
Box 86Folder 5
Louisa Minot Sedgwick
Box 86Folder 6-7
Lydia Rodgers Sedgwick
Box 86Folder 8
Maria Banyer Sedgwick
Box 86Folder 9
May Minturn Sedgwick
Box 86Folder 10
Minturn Sedgwick
Box 86Folder 11
Natalie Sedgwick
Box 86Folder 12
Robert Sedgwick
Box 86Folder 13
Sarah Ashburner Sedgwick I
Box 86Folder 14
Sarah Ashburner Sedgwick II
Box 86Folder 15
Susan Ridley Sedgwick
Box 86Folder 16
Theodore Sedgwick II
Box 86Folder 17
Theodore Sedgwick III
Box 86Folder 18
Rev. Theodore Sedgwick
Box 86Folder 19-20
William Ellery Sedgwick (son of Robert)
Box 86Folder 21
William Ellery Sedgwick (son of Alexander)
Box 86Folder 22
Katherine Sedgwick Valerio
Box 86Folder 23
Frances Sedgwick Watson
Box 86Folder 24
Mary Watson
Box 86Folder 25
Robert Watson
Box 86Folder 26
Alexander Watts
Box 86Folder 27-30
Frances Sedgwick Watts

B. Dated family correspondence, 1800-1946

Arranged chronologically.

Box 87
1800-1827
Box 88
1828-1837
Box 89
1838-1841
Box 90
1842-Sep. 1844
Box 91
Oct. 1844-July 1850
Box 92
Aug. 1850-July 1854
Box 93
Aug. 1854-Mar. 1858
Box 94
Apr. 1858-1860
Box 95
1861-1867
Box 96
1868-1879
Box 97
1880-June 1883
Box 98
July 1883-1893
Box 99
1894-1898
Box 100
1899-1913
Box 101
1914-1946

IX. Miscellaneous Sedgwick family papers, 1778-1946

This series contains Sedgwick family papers, other than correspondence, that do not relate to one particular family member. Dating from 1778 to 1946, with many undated papers, they are divided into five categories: genealogical papers, real estate and financial papers, unidentified Sedgwick family papers, miscellaneous printed material, and artwork.

A. Genealogical papers, n.d.

Arranged by subject.

Within this section are several Sedgwick genealogies, most of which begin with the family's European ancestry. Also included here are sketches of ancestor Robert Sedgwick of London, a Minot family genealogy, a Sedgwick family seal and pedigree (in oversize), and many undated notes. Volume 47, entitled "Genealogical Details," is a notebook compiled by Theodore Sedgwick III containing information about his family's history and genealogy.

Box 102Folder 1-3
Sedgwick family genealogies, n.d.
Box 102Folder 4
Sketch of Robert Sedgwick of London, n.d.
Box 102Folder 5-6
Article and notes of Henry D. Sedgwick II, n.d.
Box 102Folder 7
Minot family genealogy, n.d.
Box 102Folder 8-13
Miscellaneous genealogical notes, n.d.
Vol. 47
Genealogical details, n.d

B. Real estate and financial papers, 1798-1911

Arranged chronologically by subject.

Included in this subseries are papers relating to the Sedgwick family home in Stockbridge, built by Theodore Sedgwick in 1785. They consist of excerpts from the wills of TS II and TS III, several descriptions of the land and property, and detailed inventories of the contents of the mansion (most likely created in 1813, at the time of Theodore Sedgwick's death). Also found here is an inventory of books, china, and glassware from a Sedgwick home on 24th Street in New York City.

Papers relating to the Sedgwick family cemetery (also known as the Sedgwick Pie) include an agreement of trust between family members, trust accounts, lists of Sedgwick family descendants, and a memorandum concerning the cemetery written by Alexander Sedgwick in 1911. Also found here are indentures granting land at Laurel Hill to the town of Stockbridge, family financial accounts relating to the trusts of Robert Sedgwick's daughters, and accounts between Henry Dwight Sedgwick II and William Minot II concerning the Spring Lane estate. The bulk of these accounts date from the 1890s.

Box 102Folder 14
Papers relating to Stockbridge mansion, 1839-1878
Box 102Folder 15-17
Property inventories--Stockbridge mansion, n.d.
Box 102Folder 18
Property inventory--24th St., New York City, n.d.
Box 102Folder 19
Miscellaneous property inventories, n.d.
Box 102Folder 20-21
Papers relating to Sedgwick family cemetery, 1891-1911
Box 102Folder 22
Laurel Hill indentures, 1834-1878
Box 102Folder 23-26
Family financial accounts, 1798-1902

C. Unidentified Sedgwick family papers, 1778-1946

Arranged chronologically by subject.

This section contains correspondence, poetry, essays, notes, recipes, prescriptions, financial records, and other documents that appear to be related to the Sedgwick family but could not be specifically identified by creator. Of particular note are copies of a variety of historical documents, which include the early records of First Church, Boston; a charter of King Stephen of England to the Priory of Eye in Suffolk; chapter 7 of Exposition of the Province Law of William III, by Edmund Trowbridge; and "The Message of Jefferson Davis" (1864).

i. Unidentified correspondence, 1838-1927

Box 103Folder 1-9
Correspondence, n.d.
Box 103Folder 10-11
Correspondence, 1838-1927

ii. Unidentified poems and literary works, 1839-1899

Box 103Folder 12-20
Poems and literary works, n.d.
Box 103Folder 21-22
Poems and literary works, 1839-1899

iii. Unidentified essays and notes, n.d., 1825

Box 103Folder 23
Essay, "On the Civilization of the Sandwich Islands," n.d.
Box 103Folder 24
Essay, "On the Influence of a Superior Mind over Society," n.d.
Box 103Folder 25
Biographical sketch of Theodore Sedgwick II, n.d.
Box 103Folder 26
Religious notes, n.d
Box 103Folder 27
Notes on New Testament, n.d.
Box 103Folder 28-31
Legal notes, n.d.
Box 104Folder 1-3
Political notes, n.d.
Box 104Folder 4
Notes in French, n.d.
Box 104Folder 5
Notes in German, n.d.
Box 104Folder 6
Notes in Italian, n.d.
Box 104Folder 7-10
Miscellaneous essay fragments and notes, n.d.
Box 104Folder 11
"The Collection," vol. 1, no. 3, 1825

iv. Unidentified recipes and prescriptions, 1783-1883

Box 104Folder 12-13
Miscellaneous recipes, n.d.
Box 104Folder 14
Recipe book, 1783-1825
Box 104Folder 15
Recipe book, 1824
Box 104Folder 16
Miscellaneous prescriptions, 1866-1883

v. Unidentified accounts and receipts, 1813-1946

Box 104Folder 17-19

vi. Unidentified copies of historical documents, n.d., 1864

Box 104Folder 20-22

vii. Unidentified notebooks, n.d.

Box 104Folder 23-24

viii. Miscellaneous unidentified documents, 1778-1939

Box 104Folder 25-27
Unidentified documents, n.d.
Box 105Folder 1-6
Unidentified documents, n.d.
Box 105Folder 7
Unidentified documents, 1778-1939

D. Miscellaneous printed material, 1819-1941

Arranged alphabetically by subject.

Within this section are books, periodicals, printed advertisements, programs, corporate reports, and other printed material that is not definitively connected to one person within the collection of Sedgwick family papers. Taking date and subject matter into consideration, as well as the material's former location in the Sedgwick V papers, it is likely that most of these papers belonged to Henry Dwight Sedgwick II and his family. In most cases, their original arrangement within that collection has been retained.

Box 105Folder 8
Adirondack League Club, 1890
Box 105Folder 9-12
Advertisements, 1843-1900
Box 105Folder 13
"Aesop's Fables," n.d.
Box 105Folder 14
All Souls' Church, New York, 1869-1899
Box 105Folder 15
Appleton's Literary Bulletin, 1886
Box 105Folder 16
Art and Archaeology, 1928
Box 105Folder 17
"The Art Interchange," 1882
Box 105Folder 18
Bank publications, 1893-1896
Box 105Folder 19
"Boston Draft Riot," 1863
Box 105Folder 20
Boston Drawing Book, 1840
Box 105Folder 21
Broadsides, 1839-1864
Box 105Folder 22
Calling cards, n.d.
Box 105Folder 23
Calumet and Hecla Mining Company, 1891-1893
Box 105Folder 24
Chateau de Dieudonne, Bornel, France, n.d.
Vol. 48
Church of Our Fathers, Roland H. Bainton, 1941
Box 105Folder 25
Collection of Humorous, Dramatic and Dialect Selections, 1878
Box 105Folder 26
Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 1897
Box 105Folder 27
Five O'Clock Tea, (recipe book), 1890
Box 106Folder 1-2
Harvard University, 1864-1903
Vol. 49
He, She, It: An Egyptian Chronicle, C. M. Seyppel, n.d.
Box 106Folder 3
Insurance companies, acts of incorporation, 1834-1835
Box 106Folder 4
Interlaken Inn, New Jersey, 1891
Box 106Folder 5
Maps, 1885-1887
Box 106Folder 6
Massachusetts Civic League, 1895-1896
Box 106Folder 7
Menus, 1886
Box 106Folder 8
"The Minute Man," 1927
Box 106Folder 9
Nature Magazine, 1928
Box 106Folder 10-16
News clippings, 1819-1919
Box 106Folder 17
New York City corporation notice, ca. 1841
Box 106Folder 18
New York social organizations, 1884-1901
Box 106Folder 19-20
Pamphlets, 1820-1918
Box 106Folder 21
The Passion Flower, 1835-1836
Box 106Folder 22
Plays, 1886
Box 106Folder 23-24
Poetry, 1883-1901
Box 107Folder 1
Railroad companies, 1832-1886
Box 107Folder 2
Religious publications, 1870-1899
Box 107Folder 3
"Theodore Roosevelt," 1919
Box 107Folder 4
The Royal Windsor Guide, 1839
Box 107Folder 5
St. James' Church, Chicago, 1884-1888
Box 107Folder 6
St. John's Church, Williamstown, 1895
Box 107Folder 7-11
Schoolbooks, various subjects, 1876-1891
Box 107Folder 12
School publications, 1829-1890
Box 107Folder 13
Sermon, Rev. James Walker of Charlestown, 1824
Box 107Folder 14-16
"Spirit of the Fair," NY, 5-23 Apr. 1864
Box 107Folder 17
"The Star-Spangled Banner," n.d.
Box 107Folder 18
Stockbridge, "The Bicycle Controversy," 1882
Box 107Folder 19
Stockbridge miscellaneous, 1882-1920
Box 107Folder 20
"Temperance," 1891
Box 107Folder 21
Theatre play bills, 1882-1886
Box 107Folder 22
Valentine's card, n.d.
Box 107Folder 23
Various, 1861-ca. 1920

E. Artwork, n.d., 1839-1840

Artwork found here includes etchings of Theodore Sedgwick I and II and of Rev. James Freeman, as well as several unidentified sketchbooks and a painted photographic proof of a landscape scene.

Box 107Folder 24
Needlework, n.d.
Box 107Folder 25-26
Art prints, n.d.
Box 107Folder 27
Architectural drawings and maps, n.d.
Box 108Folder 1-5
Original artwork, n.d.
Box 108Folder 6-7
Sketchbooks, 1839-1840

X. Minot family papers, 1771-1893

Arranged chronologically and by subject.

Although the Minot family papers span five generations and date from 1771 to 1893, the bulk of this series consists of the papers of William Minot and his wife, Louisa Davis Minot, produced from 1795 to 1873. The series also contains papers relating to Stephen Minot, great-grandfather of William Minot; Stephen Minot, Jr., William's grandfather; George Richards Minot, William's father; and William Minot II, William's son.

Minot family papers are found within the Sedgwick collection because of the families' several connections by marriage. These include the marriage of William's sister, Jane Minot, to Henry Dwight Sedgwick in 1817 and the marriage of Katharine Maria Sedgwick, the daughter of Charles Sedgwick, to William Minot II in 1842.

A. Early Minot family papers, 1771-1813

This subseries contains the papers of: Stephen Minot (1688-ca. 1767), the great-grandfather of William Minot; his sons Stephen Minot, Jr. (1711-1787), John Minot, and Christopher Minot; and his grandchildren Francis Minot and Sarah Minot Speakman. They include family correspondence; correspondence between Christopher Minot and Thomas Dwight; papers relating to the proprietors of the Wiscasut Company; papers relating to the sloop William and the West Indies trade; various accounts, receipts, deeds, and leases; and the estate settlement papers of Mary Speakman Minot (1754-1811), the wife of George Richards Minot and the mother of William Minot.

Box 109Folder 1-2

B. George Richards Minot papers, 1775-1802

Within this section is George Richards Minot's correspondence with his father Stephen, sister Sarah Minot Speakman, brother(?) Christopher, and son William. His personal and professional papers include correspondence with James Freeman, Thomas Dwight, George Cabot, Fisher Ames, Samuel Adams, Increase Sumner, Isaac Parker, Moses Gill, and Henry Ware. Other papers include his oration upon the death of his Harvard tutor Benjamin Wadsworth (1777), a sermon written by Minot upon the death of his mother (1785), a series of property deeds for land received as compensation due to the alteration of the New Hampshire border (1786), a statement of accounts with the heirs of Mrs. Sarah Minot (1787), his speech to "the scholars of the South English Grammar School upon the introduction of a new system of education" (1789), his resignation from the Boston School Committee (1797), his acceptance of the position of chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas for Suffolk County (1799), and his obituary in The Portfolio (1802).

Box 109Folder 3-4
Family correspondence, 1775-1801
Box 109Folder 5-12
Personal and professional papers, 1777-1802

C. William Minot papers, 1801-1873

William Minot's papers date from 1801 to 1873, the bulk consisting of his correspondence with his wife, Louisa Davis Minot, from the time of their engagement in 1809 to shortly before her death in 1858. Other family correspondence includes that with father-in-law Daniel Davis, uncle Christopher Minot, son William Minot II, and daughter Mary Minot.

Also found within this subseries is William's extensive correspondence with Elizabeth (Betsy) Jarvis from 1801-1804, various accounts and receipts, and papers relating to the Harvard tuition and education of William's nephew Henry Dwight Sedgwick II, for which William assumed responsibility after the death of his brother-in-law. William's memoirs, written in 1867, contain a description of the character of Harrison Gray Otis, as well as Otis' home, where William met his future wife Louisa at a ball in 1808.

For additional correspondence with William Minot, see also series IV.A. (Henry Dwight Sedgwick papers), series IV.B. (Jane Minot Sedgwick papers), series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick family correspondence), and series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 109Folder 13-32
William Minot correspondence with Louisa D. Minot, 1809-1837
Box 110Folder 1-17
William Minot correspondence with Louisa D. Minot, 1838-1857
Box 110Folder 18
Family correspondence, 1810-1858
Box 110Folder 19-26
Personal and professional papers, 1801-1873

D. Louisa Davis Minot papers, 1795-1858

This subseries contains the papers of Louisa Davis Minot, dating from 1795 to 1858. Included in Louisa's family correspondence are letters from her father Daniel Davis, her mother Lois Freeman Davis, her grandfather Constant Freeman, her uncle James Freeman, brothers William C. and Frederic H. Davis, son William Minot II, and daughters Mary and Julia Minot. Additional personal correspondence includes that with Octavia Brown and Miranda Southgate. Her extensive correspondence with Emma Tudor Gardiner from 1822 to 1848 has largely been transcribed, and copies of these transcriptions are filed with the original letters.

Louisa's papers also contain a geography schoolbook inscribed "Louisa Davis, Portland, 1796," a sketchbook with scenes from Stockbridge, Lenox, and surrounding areas dating from 1840, and an assignment of copyright for Easy Lessons in Perspective from Harrison Gray to Louisa (1844), as well as several undated pieces of poetry and prose. Several obituaries of Louisa published by Boston newspapers in 1858 were later reprinted as a small pamphlet, which is also found here.

For additional correspondence with Louisa Davis Minot, see also series IV.B. (Jane Minot Sedgwick papers), series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick family correspondence), series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence), and series X.C. (William Minot family correspondence).

Box 110Folder 27-30
Family correspondence, 1795-1803
Box 111Folder 1-7
Family correspondence, 1805-1852
Box 111Folder 8-17
Personal correspondence, 1795-1849
Box 111Folder 18
School book, 1796
Box 111Folder 19
Writings, 1797-1826
Box 111Folder 20
"Sketches in the Valley of the Housatonic," 1840
Box 111Folder 21
Obituaries, 1858

E. William Minot II papers, 1839-1893

This subseries consists primarily of undated correspondence between William Minot II and actress Fanny Kemble (Butler), for whom Minot served as legal advisor and close family friend. William's "Reminiscences of Fanny Kemble," written sometime before her death in 1893, can be found here both in the original manuscript and in the version published by Boston newspapers on 20 January 1893.

For family correspondence with William Minot II, see also series VI.A. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick family correspondence), series VIII (Sedgwick family correspondence), and series X.C. and X.D. (William Minot and Louisa Davis Minot family correspondence).

Box 111Folder 22-24
Papers, 1839-1884
Box 111Folder 25
"Reminiscences of Fanny Kemble," 1893

XI. Papers of related families and individuals, 1744-1911

This series consists of the correspondence and papers of families that are related to the Sedgwicks by marriage. Dating from 1744 to 1911, papers included here relate to the Davis, Dwight, Freeman, Hopkins, Livingston, Pomeroy, Rackemann, Sergeant, Watts, and Williams families. The papers of Fanny Kemble (Butler), a close friend and confidant to the Sedgwick family, are also included here.

A. Davis family correspondence, 1802-1810

Arranged chronologically.

This section contains correspondence between Daniel Davis, Lois Freeman Davis, and Frederic H. Davis, the parents and brother of Louisa Davis Minot.

For additional family correspondence, see series X.D. (Louisa Davis Minot family correspondence).

Box 112Folder 1

B. Dwight family papers, 1744-1911

Arranged chronologically and by family member.

Family correspondence in this subseries is primarily that of Col. Joseph Dwight with his wife Abigail Williams Dwight, the parents of Pamela Dwight Sedgwick. Correspondence between Abigail, her daughter Electa Hopkins, and her son Henry Dwight may also be found here. The papers of Joseph Dwight contain accounts and receipts, business correspondence, justice of the peace documents, and a 1764 Indian deed granting land in Stockbridge to Dwight. Abigail Dwight's papers include correspondence with James Gray, Daniel Hopkins, Maria and Sophia Morton, Rev. Robert Breck, Lydia Willard, Thomas Williams, Judith Thayer, Thomas Young, and Elias Gilbert.

Within the Henry Williams Dwight papers are legal papers and correspondence, including an 1824 letter from John Calhoun, as well as numerous accounts and receipts. Also found here is a memorandum book containing brief journal entries for June 1772 and July through August 1784, in addition to lists of clothing and sermon notes. Miscellaneous Dwight family papers include the correspondence of Elijah and Josiah Dwight, as well as the published articles of R. Henry W. Dwight concerning his family history.

For correspondence between Abigail Williams Dwight and her daughter Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, see series II.A. (Pamela Dwight Sedgwick family correspondence).

Box 112Folder 2-5
Family correspondence, 1753-1813
Box 112Folder 6
Joseph Dwight papers, 1744-1764
Box 112Folder 7-11
Abigail Williams Dwight papers, 1754-1788
Box 112Folder 12-13
Henry Williams Dwight papers, 1772-1824
Box 112Folder 14
Miscellaneous Dwight family papers, 1771-1911

C. Freeman family papers, 1782-1824

Arranged chronologically and by family member.

This subseries contains papers relating to the family of Louisa Davis Minot's mother, Lois Freeman Davis. Included here is family correspondence between Lois Freeman Davis, her father Constant Freeman, and her brothers James, Nehemiah, and Constant Freeman. The bulk of these letters are between Constant, Sr., and James Freeman, the first Unitarian minister of King's Chapel, Boston. Topics include family business and finances, Constant, Sr.'s efforts to emigrate from Canada, and the rocky courtship between Lois and Daniel Davis. Also included here is correspondence between James Freeman and his brother-in-law Daniel Davis, chronicling their long friendship. Two daybooks of Rev. James Freeman, labeled by him "Visits Paid and Received," record his social and ministerial visits, as well as almost daily entries on weather, plantings, and other domestic chores from October 1810 through June 1811 and from March through August 1813.

Box 112Folder 15-18
Family correspondence, 1782-1824
Box 112Folder 19-21
James Freeman correspondence with Daniel Davis, 1784-1801
Box 112Folder 22
James Freeman daybook, 1810-1811
Box 112Folder 23
James Freeman daybook, 1813

D. Hopkins family papers, 1772-1814

Arranged chronologically and by family member.

This section contains miscellaneous papers of the Hopkins family, cousins of the Sedgwicks and the Dwights. It includes various receipts and undated papers, a small amount of family correspondence, and a 1799 inscription for the tomb of Mark and Electa Hopkins, half-sister and brother-in-law of Pamela Dwight Sedgwick, written in the hand of Theodore Sedgwick. The legal papers of John S. Hopkins pertain to the Asa Bement and Timothy Edwards estates.

Box 112Folder 24
Hopkins family papers, 1772-1799
Box 112Folder 25-27
John S. Hopkins legal papers, 1799-1814

E. Fanny Kemble (Butler) papers, 1848-1865

Arranged chronologically.

Although not related by blood or marriage, renowned actress and author Frances Ann (Fanny) Kemble was a close friend to both the Sedgwick and Minot families, and her papers are found here. They include undated correspondence, poems, and a ca. 1848 paper detailing "The Libel of Pierce Butler of the City of Philadelphia." It pertains to the divorce proceedings of Fanny and her former husband, Pierce Butler.

For additional Fanny Kemble correspondence, see series IV.B. (Jane Minot Sedgwick personal papers), series VI.B. (Catharine Maria Sedgwick personal papers), series VII.B. (Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick personal correspondence), series VII.C. (Katherine Sedgwick Minot papers), and series X.C. (William Minot II personal papers).

Box 112Folder 28

F. Livingston family papers, 1745-1803

Arranged chronologically.

The Livingstons are related to the Sedgwick family through the wife of Theodore Sedgwick II, Susan Livingston Ridley Sedgwick. Many of the papers found here appear to have been collected by Theodore and Susan's son, Theodore Sedgwick III, as part of his large historical documents collection. They include the correspondence of Brockhold and James G. Livingston, legal papers of Gov. William Livingston of New Jersey (Susan Ridley Sedgwick's grandfather), business papers of Henry Livingston, a letter to Susan Livingston from Gouverneur Morris (1773), a letter from John Jay to his wife, who had stayed with the Livingstons, and a 1782 contract with the U.S. government to provide army supplies. The account book found here is a record of the delivery of produce and grain and its storage for freight to New York. The names of Robert, Henry, John, and Peter Livingston are all found within.

Box 112Folder 29-30
Livingston family papers, 1745-1782
Box 112Folder 31
Livingston family account book, 1792-1803

G. Pomeroy family papers, 1815-1872

Arranged chronologically.

This subseries contains the papers of Thaddeus Pomeroy, the husband of Eliza Sedgwick Pomeroy. Also found here are accounts of George W. Pomeroy, portions of the will of Mary Pomeroy (ca. 1872), and the undated family correspondence of Julia Pomeroy Averill, Mary Jane (Jeanie) Pomeroy, and George Pomeroy.

For papers relating to the estate of Julia Pomeroy Averill, daughter of Eliza Sedgwick Pomeroy, see also series IV.D.iv. (HDS II legal papers, Averill estate).

Box 112Folder 32

H. Charles Rackemann correspondence, 1897-1910

Arranged chronologically.

Included here is the miscellaneous correspondence of Charles Sedgwick Rackemann (1857-1933), the son of Elizabeth Sedgwick Rackemann and the grandson of Charles Sedgwick.

Box 113Folder 1

I. Sergeant family papers, 1749-1804

Arranged chronologically.

This section contains the papers of John Sergeant (1710-1749), the first husband of Abigail Williams Sergeant Dwight (the mother of Pamela Dwight Sedgwick), and the papers of John and Abigail's son John Sergeant (b. 1747). Both men were missionaries to the Stockbridge Indians. Papers include a 1749 sermon by the elder Sergeant, minutes of the Massachusetts Board of Commissioners relating to the younger Sergeant (1768-1780), and the younger Sergeant's 1804 journal.

Box 113Folder 2

J. Watts family papers, 1856-1893

Arranged chronologically and by family member.

The Watts family papers pertain to Alexander and Henry Sedgwick Watts, the husband and son of Frances Sedgwick Watts. Included here is the will of Alexander Watts, as well as Henry Sedgwick Watts' receipts, memoranda of expenses, schedule of property in the hands of Henry Dwight Sedgwick II, correspondence, an insurance policy on silver, and a photostatic copy of his 1881 will.

For papers relating to the estates of Alexander and Henry Sedgwick Watts, as well as legal papers regarding Henry Watts's incarceration in Italy as a French spy, see series IV.D.iv. (HDS II legal papers, Watts estate).

Box 113Folder 3
Alexander Watts papers, 1856-1860
Box 113Folder 4-6
Henry Sedgwick Watts papers, 1879-1893

K. Williams family papers, 1750-1814

Arranged chronologically.

This section contains the correspondence of Ephraim Williams (d.1754), father of Abigail Williams Dwight, including letters to his son Elijah. Also found here are the will of Ephraim Williams, correspondence of Elisha Williams, and an inventory of debts due the estate of Elijah Williams (1815).

Box 113Folder 7

L. Miscellaneous papers of related families, 1805-1808

Arranged chronologically.

Within this section are letters written by Ebenezer Watson, Mrs. Ridley, and Alexander Sedgwick.

Box 113Folder 8

XII. Historical collections, 1717-1910

This series contains historical documents collected by Theodore Sedgwick III, primarily between 1831 and 1833. A large portion of the collection relates to the history of pre-Revolutionary New York, including the papers of Receiver General and Collector of Customs Archibald Kennedy, Royal Navy officer Archibald Kennedy II, and New York attorneys General William Kempe and John Tabor Kempe. Also found here are the papers of Danish sea captain and inventor John Morke and Continental Congress President Elias Boudinot, a British orderly book from the battle of Louisbourg and siege of Quebec, and papers relating to Shays' Rebellion. TS III documented his collection well, as is evidenced by his 1832-1833 memoranda included here. Many papers in this series also contain notations in TS III's hand, listing the details of their acquisition. Most of the papers were acquired from his cousin Ridley Watts. Some, if not all, of the Boudinot papers were given to TS III by Elias Boudinot's daughter, Susan Boudinot Bradford. William Minot gave TS III the papers relating to Shays' Rebellion, which were originally part of the collection of Minot's father, Shays' Rebellion historian George Richards Minot.

A. John Morke papers, 1717-1755

Arranged chronologically.

This subseries contains the papers of John Morke of Boston (d. 1755), a Danish sea captain and inventor. Included here is a 1717 ship registration for his vessel Sarah and Elizabeth, signed by the king of Denmark, and numerous documents relating to Morke's sloop Albany, which sailed a trade route between Boston and New York City. These include a crew list, shipping receipts, bonds, merchant agreements, and accounts, all dating from 1729. A 1729 account book for the Albany includes portage bills, lists of the crew and their wages, and cargo manifests. The Albany's log book records a trip from Boston to New York and back from August to November 1729. Additional trade documents dating from 1732 relate to Morke's barkentine Dolphin, which also sailed out of Boston.

Later papers in this section chronicle Morke's ongoing efforts to market his ideas and inventions to various governments. These ideas include the development of a floating dock for repairing ships; a scheme to create silver from nigrello (black lead) involving alchemy and the translation of an Arabic manuscript; "proposals to subdue the enemy"; "a scheme for the defense of America"; and a list of "curious and useful designs" including new ideas for ploughs, water pipes, dressing leather, sweetening butter, designing ships, and preserving timber. Also found here are papers relating to Morke's 1742 examination by the British Navy Board for selling defensive plans to the court of France, a 1743 license from the king of Denmark to provide vessels for a factory in the East Indies, and much correspondence with governors and heads of state as Morke unsuccessfully attempted to gain a government appointment.

For papers relating to Morke's death and his estate, see series XII.D. (William Kempe papers).

Box 114Folder 1-10
Miscellaneous papers, 1717-1755
Box 114Folder 11
Account book for sloop Albany, 1729
Box 114Folder 12
Log book of sloop Albany, 1729, and letterbook, 1732-1734
Box 114Folder 13
Account of disbursements for barkentine Dolphin, 1732-1734
Box 114Folder 14
Letterbook and memoranda, 1753

B. Archibald Kennedy papers, 1733-1764

Arranged chronologically.

Archibald Kennedy served as collector of customs and receiver-general of New York from 1722 until his death in 1763. Among his papers are deeds, wills, a certificate of appointment as customs collector, and business papers relating to his position. Also found here are documents pertaining to a land dispute between Kennedy and Mathias Demott, including supporting documents and correspondence with James Alexander, and letters relating to the financial situation of Kennedy's son Thomas in London.

Box 114Folder 15-18

C. Archibald Kennedy II papers, 1744-1779

Arranged chronologically.

This subseries, the largest set of historical documents collected by Theodore Sedgwick III, contains papers relating to the naval career of Archibald Kennedy II. They include military orders and correspondence documenting Kennedy's service in the British Royal Navy from 1746, when he served as a lieutenant aboard the Otter, to the French and Indian War, when he commanded the armed frigates Prince of Orange, the Halifax, and the Flamborough, through the Stamp Act crisis in November 1765, when he served as commander of the British blockade of New York harbor. Found here is correspondence regarding ships' supplies, orders for the care of sick and injured British soldiers, a 1756 letter referencing Britain's official declaration of war with France, Kennedy's commissions and certificates of service, and several sets of orders and instructions in preparation for the British attack on Cherbourg. A 1758 volume illustrates the signals for recognizing British vessels by day, by night, and in a fog, as well as the order of British ships of war in the anticipated line of battle.

Also of note are letters and military orders illustrating the British reaction to the Stamp Act crisis in New York in early November 1765. These include correspondence with Gov. Cadwallader Colden of New York, Gov. William Franklin of New Jersey, and copies of various third-party correspondence, discussing plans to secure the stamps and concern for the safety of British officials and containing detailed descriptions of the ensuing riots.

Box 114Folder 19-30
Archibald Kennedy, Jr., papers, 1744-1758
Box 115Folder 1-13
Archibald Kennedy, Jr., papers, 1759-1779
Box 115Folder 14
Parole record book, 1760, and account book, 1767

D. William Kempe papers, 1752-1759

Arranged chronologically.

This section contains the papers of William Kempe, who served as attorney general of the Royal Province of New York from 1752 until his death in 1759. The papers consist of both personal and business correspondence, including a 1755 letter discussing the death of John Morke and the efforts of Morke's estate administrators to pay off his debts.

Box 115Folder 15-19

E. John Tabor Kempe papers, 1759-1775

Arranged chronologically.

This subseries contains the papers of John Tabor Kempe, son of William Kempe, who served as the last royal attorney general of New York from the death of his father in 1759 until his expulsion during the Revolutionary War. The bulk of his papers consists of business and legal correspondence, including letters from Col. J.W. Bradstreet, Gov. Cadwallader Colden, Peter Livingston, James Duane, and John Jay. Correspondence with Sir William Johnson, superintendent of Indian affairs, discusses Indian land disputes and Indian relations in New York. Also found here is the 1773 New York attorney general's report and an advertisement for the apprehension of John Kempe and James Duane relating to the seizure of New York land by the "Green Mountain Boys," signed by Ethan Allen.

Box 115Folder 20-30
John Taber Kempe papers, 1759-1765
Box 116Folder 1-14
John Taber Kempe papers, 1766-1775

F. French and Indian War orderly book, 1759

This volume is the orderly book for the British army's 47th Regiment of Foot under Peregrine Lascelles, kept at Louisbourg and at the Siege of Quebec, 2 June-24 September 1759.

Vol. 50

G. Elias Boudinot papers, 1782-1783

In this section are the papers of Elias Boudinot, delegate to the Continental Congress, United States representative from New Jersey, and director of the United States Mint. The papers, all of which date from 1782-1783 when Boudinot served as president of the Continental Congress, include: letters from Joshua Mersereau, a member of the Provincial Assembly of New York and the deputy commissary of prisoners; two letters from the Marquis de Lafayette congratulating Boudinot and offering "first tidings of a general peace"; letters from Robert Morris discussing the announcements of American victory and containing extracts of letters from John Adams in Paris; and notes written by Boudinot entitled "Resolutions proposed by me in Congress to save the execution of Capt. Argell" (a British prisoner of war).

Box 116Folder 15

H. Shays' Rebellion papers, 1787

Originally collected by George Richards Minot, author of History of the Insurrections in Massachusetts in the year 1786 (1788), the papers in this subseries include a letter from Gov. James Bowdoin to Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, military orders to "apprehend, disarm and secure all hostile persons," a journal of a soldier in Gen. Lincoln's army, 28 January-13 February 1787, and a copy of J. Hubbard's "Manifesto" requesting meetings of neutral parties to avoid war in Massachusetts.

Box 116Folder 16

I. Miscellaneous historical papers, 1737-1805

The bulk of papers in this section consists of 18th-century political correspondence, including that of Gov. Jonathan Belcher (1738, 1747), Gen. Phillip Schuler (1782), and Rev. Stephen West (1794-1798). Also found here is a poem in the hand of Gouverneur Morris, 18th-century ship-building instructions, an affidavit concerning the Poughkeepsie riot of 1764, a handwritten copy of The Sentinel (1765), evidence taken at the treason trial of William Pendergast (1766), meeting minutes of the commissioners of Indian affairs in Albany, New York (1775), and a letter from the Boston Committee of Correspondence (1776).

Box 116Folder 17-29

J. Memoranda on historical collections, 1832-1910

Included in this section are the notes of Theodore Sedgwick III listing the contents of his historical document collection, how he acquired it, and its physical location (largely bank vaults). The bulk of his memoranda concerns the Kennedy collections. The memoranda of TS III's son Arthur lists the papers from the collection that he lent to the Casino Historical Exhibition in July 1910, including a detailed description of several of the items.

Box 116Folder 30
Theodore Sedgwick III memoranda, 1832-1833
Box 116Folder 31
Arthur G. Sedgwick memoranda, 1910

XIII. Unrelated papers and volumes, 1791-1889

This series contains papers and volumes that have no identifiable connection to the Sedgwick family and that do not appear to have been collected by Theodore Sedgwick III as part of his historical document collection. They include the correspondence of Timothy B. Field, son of the Reverend D.D. Field, concerning his court-martial and dismissal from the U.S. Navy, and his later readmittance. Also found here is the correspondence of John Randall, a Harvard-educated physician; the account books of John Bacon, J.G. Fine, and the estate of Moses Ashley; the journal of Mrs. William Seton; a letterbook of Marcus Spring; George Shattuck's passport; and other miscellaneous papers.

A. Unrelated papers, 1799-1875

Box 117Folder 1
John Randall correspondence, 1799-1839
Box 117Folder 2
Timothy Field correspondence, 1826-1831
Box 117Folder 3-8
Miscellaneous papers, 1837-1875

B. Unrelated volumes, 1791-1889

Vol. 51
Account book of John Bacon, 1784-1822
Box 117Folder 9
Account book, Moses Ashley Estate, 1791-1798
Box 117Folder 10
Account book, 1793-1795
Box 117Folder 11
Journal of Mrs. William Seton, 1803-1804
Box 117Folder 12
Passport of George Shattuck, ca. 1836
Vol. 52
Marcus Spring letterbook, 1848-1853
Box 117Folder 13
Account book of J.G. Fine, 1888-1889

Appendix: Descendants of Theodore Sedgwick

This family tree is based on information found in Hubert Merrill Sedgwick's A Sedgwick Genealogy: Descendants of Deacon Benjamin Sedgwick (New Haven Colony Historical Society, 1961), http://www.sedgwick.org/na/library/books/sed1961/sed1961.html, and from the MHS collection of Sedgwick family papers. Individuals whose papers can be found within the Sedgwick family papers (Ms. N-851) are highlighted in bold.

1. Theodore Sedgwick, 1746-1813

+ Eliza Mason, 1744-1774
+ Pamela Dwight, 1753-1807

2. Eliza Mason Sedgwick, 1775-1827

+ Thaddeus Pomeroy, 1764-1847

3. Theodore Sedgwick Pomeroy, 1798-1845

+ Huldah Fellows Hopkins

4. Theodore Sedgwick Pomeroy 2nd, 1824-1865

4. Mary Jane Pomeroy, "Jeanie," 1825-1895

4. Frances Hopkins Pomeroy, "Fanny," 1829-1851

3. George Williams Pomeroy, 1799-1856

3. Egbert Benson Pomeroy, 1801-1825

3. Pamela Dwight Pomeroy, 1803-1804

3. Elizabeth Pamela Pomeroy, 1805-1856

+ Horatio Byington

4. Eliza Sedgwick Byington, 1829-1857

4. Thaddeus Pomeroy Byington, 1832-1846

4. Alice Byington, 1841-?

4. Rebecca Byington, 1843-1850

3. Ebenezer Watson Pomeroy, 1806-1861

3. Frances Susan Pomeroy, 1807-1853

3. Catherine Eliza Pomeroy, 1809-1880

+ Samuel Parker

4. Egbert Pomeroy Parker, 1837-1870

4. Mary Hamilton Parker, 1838-1927

4. Robert P. Parker, 1839-1870

4. Charles Sedgwick Parker, 1841-1884

4. Francis Herbert Parker, 1848-1885

4. Grace S. Parker, 1853-1936

3. Julia Pomeroy, 1812-1868

+ Chester Averill, d. 1837

4. Chester Averill, 1836-1883

3. Charles Sedgwick Pomeroy, 1813-1850

3. Mary Pomeroy, 1815-1872

3. Thaddeus Pomeroy, 1817-1851

2. Frances Pamela Sedgwick, 1778-1842

+ Ebenezer Watson, 1776-1847

3. Theodore Sedgwick Watson, 1802-1820

3. Ebenezer Henry Watson, 1804-1850

+ Elizabeth Jane Knapp, 1807-1865

4. Frances Sedgwick Watson, 1830-1830

4. Frances Sedgwick Watson, 1832-1899

4. Egbert Pomeroy Watson, 1835-1909

4. Susan Ridley Watson, 1839-1917

4. Emma Watson, 1842-1919

4. Harry Hopkins Watson, 1844-1863

4. Lindsey Watson, 1849-1920

3. Catherine Sears Watson, 1806-1848

+ Abner Webb

4. Robert Watson Webb, 1834-

4. Frances Sedgwick Webb, 1836-1837

4. Fanny Watson Webb, 1838-

4. Catherine Jane Webb, 1840-1841

4. Charles Sedgwick Webb, 1842-

4. Alice Lindsey Webb, 1845-

3. Robert Sedgwick Watson, 1809-1888

+ Mary Taber Hathaway, 1813-1890

4. Sylvia Hathaway Watson, 1834-

4. Mary Forbes Watson, 1836-1891

4. Louisa Watson, 1838-1839

4. Jane Sedgwick Watson, 1838-1912

4. Adelaide Howard Watson, 1841-1869

4. Anna Russell Watson, 1843-1909

4. Robert Clifford Watson, 1847-1902

4. Francis Sedgwick Watson, 1853-

4. Theodora Sedgwick Watson, 1856-1878

3. Frances Pamela Watson, "Fanny," 1811-1882

2. Theodore Sedgwick II, 1780-1839

+ Susan Anne Livingston Ridley, 1788-1867

3. Theodore Sedgwick III, 1811-1859

+ Sarah Morgan Ashburner, 1812-1856

4. Theodore Sedgwick, 1836-1837

4. Susan Ridley Sedgwick, 1838-1872

+ Charles Eliot Norton, 1827-1908

4. Sara Price Ashburner Sedgwick, 1839-1915

+ William Erasmus Darwin

4. Theodore Sedgwick, 1841-1842

4. Arthur George Sedgwick, 1844-1915

+ Lucy Tuckerman, 1858-1904

4. Charles Ridley Sedgwick, 1846-1846

4. Maria Theodora Sedgwick, 1851-1916

3. Maria Banyer Sedgwick, 1813-1886

2. Henry Dwight Sedgwick, 1785-1831

+ Jane Minot, 1795-1859

3. George Minot Sedgwick, 1818-1821

3. Jane Minot Sedgwick II, 1821-1889

3. Frances Sedgwick, 1822-1858

+ Alexander Watts, 1815-1860

4. Alexander Watts, 1852-1860

4. Henry Sedgwick Watts, 1858-1893

3. Henry Dwight Sedgwick II, 1824-1903

+ Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, 1829-1902

4. Jane Minot Sedgwick, 1859-1918

+ Michele Ricciardi, d. 1917

4. Henry Dwight Sedgwick III, 1861-1957

+ Sarah May Minturn, 1865-1919

4. Theodore Sedgwick IV, 1863-1951

+ Mary Aspinwall Bend

4. Alexander Sedgwick, 1867-1929

+ Lydia Cameron Rogers, 1867-1934

5. William Ellery Sedgwick, 1899-

5. Christiana Davenport Sedgwick, 1897-1951

+ John Marquand

5. Alexander Cameron Sedgwick, 1901-1996

4. Ellery Sedgwick, 1872-1960

+ Mabel Cabot, 1873-1937

3. Louisa Minot Sedgwick, 1826-1841

2. Robert Sedgwick, 1787-1841

+ Elizabeth Dana Ellery, 1799-1862

3. Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick, 1824-1909

+ Francis James Child

4. Helen Maria Child, 1863-1903

4. Susan Ridley Sedgwick Child, 1866-1946

4. Henrietta Ellery Child, 1867-

4. Francis Sedgwick Child, 1868-1935

3. William Ellery Sedgwick, 1825-1873

+ Constance Irving Brevoort, 1828-

4. Robert Sedgwick, 1852-

4. Henry Brevoort Sedgwick, 1853-1854

4. Francis Edward Sedgwick, 1854-1876

4. William Ellery Sedgwick, 1856-1869

4. Laura Brevoort Sedgwick, 1859-1907

4. Helen Ellery Sedgwick, 1861-

3. Robert Sedgwick, 1826-1827

3. Susan Ridley Sedgwick, 1828-1883

+ Charles E. Butler, 1818-1897

4. Charles Sedgwick Butler, 1856-1866

4. Henrietta Sedgwick Butler, 1859-1859

4. Robert Sedgwick Butler, 1861-1866

3. Henrietta Ellery Sedgwick, 1829-1902

+ Henry Dwight Sedgwick II, 1824-1903
See descendants of Henry Dwight Sedgwick II (above).

3. Katherine Maria Sedgwick, 1831-1884

+ Joseph Valerio
+ William T. Washburn

4. Nathalie D'Oremieulx Washburn [Natalie Sedgwick], 1873-1942

+ Bainbridge Colby

3. Helen Ellery Sedgwick, 1836-1857

3. Edith Ellery Sedgwick, 1838-

2. Catharine Maria Sedgwick, 1789-1867

2. Charles Sedgwick, 1791-1856

+ Elizabeth Buckminster Dwight, 1801-1864

3. Katharine Maria Sedgwick, 1820-1880

+ William Minot II, 1817-1894

4. Jane Sedgwick Minot, 1844-1847

4. Alice Woodbourne Minot, 1847-1883

4. William Minot III, 1849-1900

4. Charles Sedgwick Minot, 1852-1914

4. Robert Sedgwick Minot, 1856-1910

4. Henry Davis Minot, 1859-1890

4. Laurence Minot, 1865-1921

3. Charles Sedgwick II, 1822-1841

3. Elizabeth Dwight Sedgwick, 1826-1891

+ Frederick William Rackemann, d. 1884

4. Charles Sedgwick Rackemann, 1857-1933

4. Frederick William Rackemann, 1860-1861

4. Felix Rackemann, 1861-1934

4. Elizabeth Sedgwick Rackemann, 1863-1924

4. Louise Sedgwick Rackemann, 1865-1960

4. William Frederick Rackemann, 1868-1939

3. William Dwight Sedgwick, 1831-1862

+ Louisa Frederica Tellkampf, d. 1879

4. Grace Sedgwick, 1858-

4. Amelia Sedgwick, 1859-

4. Mary Elizabeth Sedgwick, 1861-

3. Grace Ashburner Sedgwick, 1833-1897

+ Charles Astor Bristed, 1820-

4. Charles Astor Bristed, Jr., 1869-1936

+ Penelope Russell 1769-1827
[3rd wife of Theodore Sedgwick]

Preferred Citation

Sedgwick family papers, Massachusetts Historical Society.

Access Terms

This collection is indexed under the following headings in ABIGAIL, the online catalog of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Researchers desiring materials about related persons, organizations, or subjects should search the catalog using these headings.

Persons:

Boudinot, Elias, 1740-1821.
Butler, Fanny Kemble, 1809-1893.
Davis family.
Dwight family.
Freeman, James, 1759-1835.
Freeman family.
Kempe, John Tabor, 1735-1792.
Kennedy, Archibald, 1685-1763.
Kennedy, Archibald, d. 1794.
Minot, George Richards, 1758-1802.
Minot, Katharine Sedgwick, 1820-1880.
Minot, Louisa Davis, 1788-1858.
Minot, William, 1783-1873.
Morke, John, d. 1755.
Sedgwick, Alexander, 1867-1929.
Sedgwick, Catharine Maria, 1789-1867.
Sedgwick, Charles, 1791-1856.
Sedgwick, Elizabeth Dana Ellery, 1799-1862.
Sedgwick, Henrietta Ellery, 1829-1902.
Sedgwick, Henry D. (Henry Dwight), 1785-1831.
Sedgwick, Henry Dwight, 1824-1903.
Sedgwick, Jane Minot, 1795-1859.
Sedgwick, Jane Minot, 1821-1889.
Sedgwick, Pamela Dwight, 1753-1807.
Sedgwick, Robert, 1787-1841.
Sedgwick, Theodore, 1746-1813.
Sedgwick, Theodore, 1780-1839.
Sedgwick, Theodore, 1811-1859.
Watts family.
Williams family.

Organizations:

Catholic Church--Massachusetts.
Federal Party (Mass.).
Federal Party (U.S.).
Great Britain--Royal Navy.
New York Underground Railway Co. (New York, N.Y.).
United States--Continental Army--Supplies and stores.
United States--Continental Congress.

Subjects:

Account books.
Berkshire County (Mass.)--Social life and customs.
Boston (Mass.)--Social life and customs.
Commonplace-books.
Family history--1750-1799.
Family history--1800-1849.
Family history--1850-1899.
France--Description and travel--1800-1918.
Italy--Description and travel.
Judges--Massachusetts.
Lawyers--Massachusetts.
Legislators--Massachusetts.
Massachusetts--Politics and government.
Mental illness.
Orderly books.
Québec Campaign, 1759.
Real property--Massachusetts--Berkshire County.
Shays' Rebellion, 1786-1787.
Stockbridge (Mass.)--Social life and customs.
United States--History--French and Indian War, 1755-1763.
United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--Equipment and supplies.
United States--Politics and government.
Urban transportation--New York (State)--New York.
Women authors, American.

Materials Removed from the Collection

The following items have been removed from the Sedgwick family papers:

Photographs, now in the MHS Photographs collection.

Engravings, now in the MHS Engravings collection.

Blank postcards depicting late 19th century European locations or religious themes, now in the MHS Postcards collection.

Artifacts, now in the MHS Museum Objects collection, including a bowling pin, spectacles, needlework, an ivory medallion, an architectural sculpture fragment, a painted tile, and wax seals.

Lottery tickets to the Rhode Island lottery (February 1749/1750 ), and the Massachusetts lottery (February 1781), now in the MHS Numismatics collection.

Printed materials, now in the MHS Printed Materials collection, including: Directions to be observ'd in taking the pill or drop (London? : s.n., 17--); This to inform the curious, that the wonderful and surprizing artist lately arrived from the city of Norwich, is to be seen... (London? : s.n., 17--); Please to observe, approve or object: a proposal visible and practicable (London: s.n., 1751); By the commissioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of Great-Britain and Ireland &c (London: s.n., 1764); Sir, being by the General Assembly of this Commonwealth appointed managers of a lottery... (Boston: 1781); Peale. Charles W. To the Citizens of the United States of America (Philadelphia, 1790); Western Star (Stockbridge, Mass.) issue of 15 February 1791; Albany Centinal issue of 4 June 1800; Sir, it has long been a subject of regret . . . that no suitable tribute has yet been paid [proposed monument to George Washington] (Boston: 1811); and Literary World, no. 282 (June 26, 1852).