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Adams Family Papers : An Electronic Archive

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John Adams diary 25, 27 October 1775 - 13 October 1776


Front Cover
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25
[The preceding text was added in the handwriting of Charles Francis Adams]



Inside Front Cover
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Colonies?



R. R. Livingston. Cloathing will rise tho Provisions will fall. Labourers will be discharged. One Quarter Part of R. Island, N. York, and Pensylvania depend upon Trade, as Merchants, Shopkeepers, Shipwrights, Blockmakers, Riggers, Smiths, &c. &c. &c.

The 6 Northern Dollars [Colonies ] must raise 9 millions of Dollars to support the Poor.

This Vote will stop our Trade for 14 months, altho it professes to do it only to the 20th of March. For the Winter when the Men of War cannot cruise upon the Coast is the only Time that We can trade.

Wealthy Merchants, and monied Men cannot get the Interest of Money.

More Virtue is expected from our People, than any People ever had. The low Countries did not reason as We do about speculative opinions, but they felt the oppression for a long Course of Years, rich and poor.

Zubly. Concludes that the Sense and Bent of the People, is vs. stopping Trade by the Eagerness with which they exported before the 10th. of September.

We cant get Intelligence, without Trade. All that are supported by Trade, must be out of Business.

Every Argument which shews that our Association will materially affect the Trade of G.B. will shew that We must be affected too, by a Stoppage of our Trade.

G.B. has many Resources. I have bought 2 Barrells of Rice in Carolina for 15s. and Negro Cloth was 3s. instead of 18d.



The W. Indies will get supplies to keep soul and Body together. The ingenious Dutchmen will smuggle some Indian Corn from America.

Is it right to starve one Man because I have quarelled with another. I have a great Scruple whether it is just, or prudent. In Decr. 1776, We shall owe between 20 and 30 Millions of Money.

J. Rutledge. Am for adhering to the Association and going no further. The Non Export. in Terrorem -- and generally agreed.

The Consequences will be dreadfull, if We ruin the Merchants.

Will not the Army be supplied if Vessells go from one Province to another.

We may pass a Resolution that no live Stock shall be exported.

Paine brought in a large Sample of Salt Petre, made in this City, by Mr. Ripsama. It is very good, large and burns off, when laid upon a Coal like moist Powder. I tried it.
Heard Mr. Carmichael, at Mr. Duffils, on "Trust in the Lord and do good, so shall you dwell in the Land and verily thou shallt be fed."


Ross. We cant get Seamen to man 4 Vessells. We could not get 5 men to mann our Boats, our Gallies.

Wythe, Nelson, and Lee for fitting out 4 Ships.



Began my journey to Phildelphia, dined at C. [Colonel] Miffiins at Cambridge with G. Washington, and Gates and their Ladies, and half a Dozen Sachems and Warriours of the french Cocknowaga Tribe, with their Wives and Children. Williams is one, who was captivated in his Infancy, and adopted. There is a Mixture of White Blood french or English in most of them.Louis, their Principal, speaks English and french as well as Indian. It was a Savage feast, carnivorous Animals devouring their Pray. Yet they were wondrous polite. The General introduced me to them as one of the Grand Council Fire at Philadelphia, upon which they made me many Bows, and a cordial Reception.
About 10 Mr. Gerry called me, and we rode to Framingham, where We dined.Coll. Buckminster after Dinner shewed us, the Train of Artillery brought down from Ticonderoga, by Coll. Knox. It consists of Iron -- 9 Eighteen Pounders, 10 Twelves, 6. six, four nine Pounders, Three 13. Inch Mortars, Two

Ten Inch Mortars, one Eight Inch, and one six and an half. Howitz, one Eight Inch and an half and one Eight.
Brass Cannon. Eight Three Pounders, one four Pounder, 2 six Pounders, one Eighteen Pounder, and one 24 Pounder. One eight Inch and an half Mortar, one Seven Inch and an half Dto. and five Cohorns.
After Dinner, rode to Maynards, and supped there very agreably.
Stopped at Sternes's [Stearns's] in Worcester, and dined with Mr. Lincoln at Mr. Jonathan Williams's. In Putnams Office where I formerly trimm'd the Midnight Lamp, Mr. Williams keeps Laws Works and Jacob Behmens, with whose Mistical Reveries he is much captivated.


Mem.
The Confederation to be taken up in Paragraphs.
An Alliance to be formed with France and Spain.
Embassadors to be sent to both Courts.
Government to be assumed in every Colony.
Coin and Currencies to be regulated.
Forces to be raised and maintained in Canada and New York. St. Lawrence and Hudsons Rivers to be secured.
Hemp to be encouraged and the Manufacture of Duck.
Powder Mills to be built in every Colony, and fresh Efforts to make Salt Petre.
An Address to the Inhabitants of the Colonies.


The Committee for Lead and Salt to be fill'd up, and Sulphur added to their Commission.
Money to be sent to the Paymaster, to pay our Debts, and fullfill our Engagements.
Taxes to be laid, and levied, Funds established. New Notes to be given on Interest, for Bills borrowed.
Treaties of Commerce with F. S. H. D. &c.
Declaration of Independency, Declaration of War with the Nation, Cruising on the british Trade, their East India Ships and Sugar Ships.
Prevent the Exportation of Silver and Gold.


Mr. Upham informs that this Town of Brookfield abounds with a Stone, out of which Allum, Coperas and Sulphur are made. Out of one Bushell of this Stone, he made five Pounds of Coperas. He put the Stone into a Tub, poured Water on it, let it Stand 2 or 3 days, then drew it off, and boiled the Liquor away -- let it stand and it shot into a Kind of Christals. Adding Chamberly and Alkaline Salts to the Coperas and that makes Allum.
We made some Sulphur, by Sublimation. We put 4 Quarts of the Stone into an Iron Kettle, laid a Wooden Cover over the Kettle leaving an Hole in the Middle. Then We put an Earthern Pot over the Top of the Kettle, and cemented it with Clay -- then made a fire under the Kettle, and the Sulphur sublimated. We got about a Spoonfull.
We have found a Bed of yellow Ocre in this Town. I got 12,00 Wt.

We make Spanish Brown by burning the yellow Ocre.
Rode to Springfield, dined at Scotts. Heard that the Cannon Kingsbridge in N. York were spiked up. That dry Goods, English Good were sent round to N. York from Boston, and from N. York sold all over N.E. and sent down to Camp. That Tryon has issued Writs for the Choice of a new Assembly, and that the Writs were likely to b obeyed, and the Tories were likely to carry a Majority of Members.


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Took with me to N.Y. 51 dollars and 5s. 8d. Pen. Currency in Change.


Sat out from Phyladelphia toward Boston, oated at the Red Lyon, dined at Bristol, crossed Trenton ferry, long before Sun set, drank Coffee at the Ferry House on the East Side of Delaware, where I putt up -- partly to avoid riding in the Evening Air, and partly because 30 miles is enough for the first day, as my Tendons are delicate, not having been once on Horse back since the Eighth day of last February.


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Pages 54 - 57
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Coll. Whipple lodges at Mrs. in Walnut Street.
Mr. Hancock, Messrs. Adams's, Paine and Gerry at Mrs. Yards in 2d Street.
Mr. Hopkins at
Mr. Sherman, Coll. Wolcott and Coll. Huntington at Mr. Duncans in 3d.
Mr. Duane at the Collectors in Markett Street, next door to Coll. Reads.


Gen. Livingston, Mr. De Hart in Second Street.
Mr. Serjeant at Dr. Ewing's.
Mr. Moreton at Mr. Wilson at
Mr. Johnson at
Mr. Alexander at
Mr. Goldsborough at
Mr. Tilghman at his Brothers.
Coll. R. H. Lee at
Coll. F. L. Lee at the Corner opposite Mr. George Clymers.
Mr. Wythe in Chesnutt Street.
Coll. Harrison at Randolphs.


Mr. Braxton at
Mr. Hewes, at, in 3d Street -- lives alone.
Mr. Rutledge at Mrs. Yards.
Mr. Lynch at
Mr. Lynch Junr. at


Inside Back Cover
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Back Cover
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Cite web page as: John Adams diary 25, 27 October 1775 - 13 October 1776 [electronic edition]. Adams Family Papers: An Electronic Archive. Massachusetts Historical Society. http://www.masshist.org/digitaladams/
Original manuscript: Adams, John. John Adams diary 25, 27 October 1775 - 13 October 1776. Stitched sheets in leather cover (60 pages). Original manuscript from the Adams Family Papers, Massachusetts Historical Society.
Source of transcription: Butterfield, L.H., ed. Diary and Autobiography of John Adams. Vol. 2.Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1961.

Searched all words in all documents for memorandum of measures