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Adams Family Papers : An Electronic Archive
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Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, 18 November 1794


My Dearest Friend

I had just sent off to the Post Office, my Letter in which I requested a Diary of Husbandry when I went to the Senate Chamber where I found your Letter of the 10th [Abigail to John, 10 November 1794] , which contained the very Thing I had asked for, very accurate and pleasing. I hope for a continuance of it, for nothing refreshes me like it, in the dull Solitude to which I am destined for four months.

A Senate was made to Day, by the Arrival of Col. Burr, as fat as a Duck and as ruddy as a roost Cock. An hundred Thousand Pounds is a very wholesome Thing I believe, and I suppose my manifold Infirmities are owing to my Poverty. I know not whether fame lies, on this occasion, but she begins to whisper that Burr has been very fortunate and successful as well as several others of Govr. Clintens friends, by means that I will not explain till fame explains them more in detail.


These simple Republicans are rewarded in this World for their Virtues, as well as admired for their Talents.

Tomorrow We shall have the Speech, which is to be delivered in the House of Representatives as there is some doubt of the Solidity of the Building to hold a Crowd in the Senate Chamber.

They have built us no Gallary, from which neglect some conclude that the Joi-disant friends of the People are afraid that the Senate will appear to the People better friends than them Selves. The Debate on Mr. Gallatin's Election seems to have abated the public Curiosity.

Mrs. Cabot comes here, without Handmaiden or female Companion, in six Days by the Stage Coach and is as alert as if she had done nothing.

I am glad you went to Haverhil to see our unfortunate afflicted Sister, but am anxious about that paltry River, lest it should bring again your intermittent.

Adieu
J. A.


[Endorsement -- see page image]



Cite web page as: Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, 18 November 1794 [electronic edition]. Adams Family Papers: An Electronic Archive. Massachusetts Historical Society. http://www.masshist.org/digitaladams/
Original manuscript: Adams, John. Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, 18 November 1794. 3 pages. Original manuscript from the Adams Family Papers, Massachusetts Historical Society.
Source of transcription: Adams Papers Editorial Project. Unverified transcription.
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