Search the Indexes

Search limitations

This tool searches Harbottle Dorr, Jr.'s indexes only. It does not search the text of newspapers or pamphlets or Dorr's annotations.

Detailed explanation of search results

The default scope of the search tool is to search for the requested word/words within the index terms of all four volumes simultaneously. Search results will be presented as one list of index terms ordered by volume and page number from all four volumes containing the requested search terms. To search for a word or words within one of the indexes for a specific volume, select that particular volume from the drop down box within the search form. [Reminder: to browse (rather than search) any of the four indexes, please start at the Collection Outline.]

Each index entry listed on the search results page is structured as follows:

  • The indexed term(s).
  • A linked-number: Clicking this takes you to the specific volume and page number that Dorr indexed. At this time, users must read the individual newspaper page to find the indexed content.
  • The blue, double-arrow : Click this to see an expanded view that shows each term in the context of the terms Dorr wrote above and below on the original index page.
  • "See index" see index: Clicking this will take you to the original index page in which this search term appeared.

The search feature also automatically returns truncated words without the use of wildcard symbols. For example, if you search for "draw" you will also see "draws" and "drawing"; "sell" shows "selling" and "sellers"; and "address" displays "addresses", "addressed", "addressing".

Examples

example of searching `thunder`

When you search for the word "thunder" you should see thirteen results. The first result – "Thunder Terrible at Boston" – is followed by the numbers "2:191," indicating that Dorr indexed an article that appeared in Volume 2, on Page 191.

In the list of search results, if you click on the blue-double arrow you see an expanded view of the search term in the context of the other terms on Dorr’s index page. See below:

example of searching `thunder`

When you follow the link for the first result (“Thunder Terrible at Boston”), and click on “2:191” you will be taken to the page Dorr numbered 191 within volume 2. You will need to read the newspaper to determine which article prompted Dorr to create the index term. To the right of the blue, double-arrow is a link labeled "see index". Clicking this will take you to the original index page in which the searched word(s)/phrase appears.


Searching for the keyword "Washington" in all volumes:

  • Writs of Assistance Introduced by Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson] 2:Ibid
  • War declared by Turkey against Russia2:299. 2:372.
  • Weymouth Lord, writes a Bloody Letter to Justice Pon- ton[ Ponton], to order ye[ the]Troops to Fire on the Mob.2:472

Washington George, first signalized himself, & became famous in America,[ref. missing] see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Letter from General Lee[ Charles Lee], to Congress, given them an Account of the defeat of the enemy at South Carolina.4:Ibid.
  • Letter an intercepted traiterous one, to Governor Tryon[ William Tryon].4:1000.
  • Letter Given the reason why Boston was evacuated.4:1004.

Letter from General Washington[ George Washington]to Lord Howe[ William], on the exchange of Prisoners.4:Ib. see index

  • Letter from Lord Howe[ William], to General Washington[ George Washington], in answer to the above, &c4:Ib.
  • Letter an intercepted traiterous one, to Governor Tryon[ William Tryon].4:1000.
  • Letter Given the reason why Boston was evacuated.4:1004.
  • Letter from General Washington[ George Washington]to Lord Howe[ William], on the exchange of Prisoners.4:Ib.

Letter from Lord Howe[ William], to General Washington[ George Washington], in answer to the above, &c4:Ib. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Washington George, his Letter's to General Gage[ Thomas Gage], on his treatment of Prisoners.4:816.
  • Washington George, his Speech to the Con- tinental[ Continental]Congress on his appointment, relinquishes his pay, saving for his Ex- pences[ expenses].4:869.
  • Washington George, his Answer to the address of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, on General Howe[ William Howe]s evacuating Boston.4:912.

Washington George, a great encomium on him, by the Assembly of Massachusetts Bay.4:Ib. see index

  • Washington George, his answer to the address of Select- men[ Selectmen]of Boston, on the evacuation of it.4:913.
  • Washington George, a Diploma of Doctor of Laws, conferred on him by the Harvard College.4:923.
  • Washington George, Arrives at New York.4:925.
  • Washington George, appointed by the Continental Congress, General, and Commander in chief of ye[ the]United American Army.4:761.
  • Washington George, his answer to the address of the Congress of New York, on his ap- pointment[ appointment].4:760.
  • Washington George,Arrives at Cambridge, and takes the command of the Army.4:761.

Washington George, his answer to the ad- dress[ address]of the Massachusetts Congress.4:Ib. see index

  • Washington George, his Letter to the Virgi- nian[ Virginian]independent Company's, on his ap- pointment[ appointment].4:780.
  • Washington George, his Address to the Canadians.4:807.
  • Washington George, his Letter's to General Gage[ Thomas Gage], on his treatment of Prisoners.4:816.
  • Washington George, his Letter to Lord Howe[ William Howe], respecting an exchange of Prisoners.4:1004.
  • Washington George, his behaviour[ behavior]approvd.[ approved]by the Continental Congress, repecting a conference with General Howe[ William Howe].*4:982.
  • Wool, the great hardship's the Colonies labour[ labor]under, by the restraint on it, as to transportation, &c.4:1112.

* Washington George, chairman of the first meeting of Freeholders in Virginia.4:545. see index

  • Washington George, Chosen a Member of their Great Assembly, and a delegate to meet in convention4:546.
  • Washington George, and a Member of Congress ( Conti nental[ Continental],) Page4:560
  • Washington George, His name first brought into fame page 1073, Vol.2.
  • Washington George, his behaviour[ behavior]approvd.[ approved]by the Continental Congress, repecting a conference with General Howe[ William Howe].*4:982.
  • Wool, the great hardship's the Colonies labour[ labor]under, by the restraint on it, as to transportation, &c.4:1112.
  • * Washington George, chairman of the first meeting of Freeholders in Virginia.4:545.

Washington George, Chosen a Member of their Great Assembly, and a delegate to meet in convention4:546. see index

  • Washington George, and a Member of Congress ( Conti nental[ Continental],) Page4:560
  • Washington George, His name first brought into fame page 1073, Vol.2.
  • Civil War, when in England.4:1266.
  • Wool, the great hardship's the Colonies labour[ labor]under, by the restraint on it, as to transportation, &c.4:1112.
  • * Washington George, chairman of the first meeting of Freeholders in Virginia.4:545.
  • Washington George, Chosen a Member of their Great Assembly, and a delegate to meet in convention4:546.

Washington George, and a Member of Congress ( Conti nental[ Continental],) Page4:560 see index

  • Washington George, His name first brought into fame page 1073, Vol.2.
  • Civil War, when in England.4:1266.
  • Army Standing, Liberty always in danger from them.4:2.
  • Army Standing, what men generally com- poses[ composes]them.4:1196. See under Troops. See Below.
  • [parallels] American British Colonies: the Parlia- ment[ Parliament]of Great Britain, have no right to tax, or make Laws for them: they are free States4:226,4:229.4:250.

Army of the United Colo- nies[ Colonies], Formed under General Putman[ Israel Putnam]& General Washington[ George Washington], at Cam- bridge[ Cambridge].4:723,4:731.4:761. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Address From the City of London, to the King, in behalf of America.4:742.
  • Address From Crises, (the author of,) to the King.4:749.
  • Address of the Continental Congress, to the Inhabitants of Canada, on the taking of Tieconderago[ Ticonderoga ], &c,4:756.

Address of the Provincial Congress of New York, to General Washington[ George Washington], on his appointment as General.4:760. see index

  • Address of the Provincial Congress of the Massachusetts Bay, to[ General]Washington[ Washington], and Lee[ Charles Lee], on their being appointed Generals.4:761.
  • Address of Johannes in Eremo, to Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage], as a murdered, &c,4:766.
  • Address of the Provincial Congress of South Carolina, to Lord Campbel[ William Campbell], & his An- swer[ Answer].4:768.
  • Worcester County, meet, resolve against Tories, con- demn[ condemn]Tory News Papers[ Newspapers], &c.4:681.
  • Washington George, appointed by the Continental Congress, General, and Commander in chief of ye[ the]United American Army.4:761.

Washington George, his answer to the address of the Congress of New York, on his ap- pointment[ appointment].4:760. see index

  • Washington George,Arrives at Cambridge, and takes the command of the Army.4:761.
  • Washington George, his answer to the ad- dress[ address]of the Massachusetts Congress.4:Ib.
  • Washington George, his Letter to the Virgi- nian[ Virginian]independent Company's, on his ap- pointment[ appointment].4:780.
  • Address From Crises, (the author of,) to the King.4:749.
  • Address of the Continental Congress, to the Inhabitants of Canada, on the taking of Tieconderago[ Ticonderoga ], &c,4:756.
  • Address of the Provincial Congress of New York, to General Washington[ George Washington], on his appointment as General.4:760.

Address of the Provincial Congress of the Massachusetts Bay, to[ General]Washington[ Washington], and Lee[ Charles Lee], on their being appointed Generals.4:761. see index

  • Address of Johannes in Eremo, to Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage], as a murdered, &c,4:766.
  • Address of the Provincial Congress of South Carolina, to Lord Campbel[ William Campbell], & his An- swer[ Answer].4:768.
  • Address of the Continental Congress, to the inhabitants of Great Britain, on the Ameri- cans[ Americans]taking arms, &c.4:775.
  • Congress Provincial of the Massachusetts Bay, resolve to borrow Money, and address the inhabitants therefor.4:741.
  • Congress Provincial new, meet in assembly: choose officers, &c.4:743.
  • Congress Provincial resolve that the Colony bills, shalls be a Tender, &c,4:756.

Congress Provincial their address to General's Washington[ George Washington], & Lee[ Charles Lee], on their arrival at Cambridge,4:761. see index

  • Congress Provincial resolve, respecting the supply- ing[ supplying]Towns; and the enemy: selling liquors to the Soldiers: and improving the Tories es- tates[ estates], &c [diamond-zero] See Representatives of Massachusetts Bay * & Assembly4:764.
  • Covenant, See Agreement.
  • Cadet Company on the dismission of Colonel Hancock[ John Hancock], return their Standard to the Governor, and dissolve themselves, &c,4:554,4:556.
  • Worcester County, meet, resolve against Tories, con- demn[ condemn]Tory News Papers[ Newspapers], &c.4:681.

Washington George, appointed by the Continental Congress, General, and Commander in chief of ye[ the]United American Army.4:761. see index

  • Washington George, his answer to the address of the Congress of New York, on his ap- pointment[ appointment].4:760.
  • Washington George,Arrives at Cambridge, and takes the command of the Army.4:761.
  • Washington George, his answer to the ad- dress[ address]of the Massachusetts Congress.4:Ib.
  • Worcester County, meet, resolve against Tories, con- demn[ condemn]Tory News Papers[ Newspapers], &c.4:681.
  • Washington George, appointed by the Continental Congress, General, and Commander in chief of ye[ the]United American Army.4:761.
  • Washington George, his answer to the address of the Congress of New York, on his ap- pointment[ appointment].4:760.

Washington George,Arrives at Cambridge, and takes the command of the Army.4:761. see index

  • Washington George, his answer to the ad- dress[ address]of the Massachusetts Congress.4:Ib.
  • Washington George, his Letter to the Virgi- nian[ Virginian]independent Company's, on his ap- pointment[ appointment].4:780.
  • Washington George, his Address to the Canadians.4:807.
  • Letter from General Lee, to General Burgoyne[ John Burgoyne].4:767.
  • Letter from ditto to ditto, declines an interview, &c.4:Ibid. 4:773.
  • Letter from General Burgoyne[ John Burgoyne], to General Lee, desire an interview, &c.4:776.

Letter from General Washington[ George Washington], to the independent Company's of Vir- ginia[ Virginia], on his taking the Command of the Continental Army.4:780 see index

  • Letter from the Tories in Fal- mouth[ Falmouth], to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], on his go- ing[ going]to England.4:788.
  • Letter from General Washington[ George Washington], to General Gage[ Thomas Gage], and from Gage[ Thomas Gage]in reply, respecting the treatment of Pri- soners[ Prisoners].4:816.
  • Letter from General Gage[ Thomas Gage], containing an Account of Bunker Hill Fight.4:817.
  • Washington George, his answer to the address of the Congress of New York, on his ap- pointment[ appointment].4:760.
  • Washington George,Arrives at Cambridge, and takes the command of the Army.4:761.
  • Washington George, his answer to the ad- dress[ address]of the Massachusetts Congress.4:Ib.

Washington George, his Letter to the Virgi- nian[ Virginian]independent Company's, on his ap- pointment[ appointment].4:780. see index

  • Washington George, his Address to the Canadians.4:807.
  • Washington George, his Letter's to General Gage[ Thomas Gage], on his treatment of Prisoners.4:816.
  • Washington George, his Speech to the Con- tinental[ Continental]Congress on his appointment, relinquishes his pay, saving for his Ex- pences[ expenses].4:869.
  • Address of the Continental Congress, to the inhabitants of Great Britain, on the Ameri- cans[ Americans]taking arms, &c.4:775.
  • Address From the same, to the People of Ireland, on the commencement of hostili ties[ hostilities]in america[ America], &c,4:787.
  • Address Petition, &c, of the City of London, to the King, relative to the civil War in America, &c.4:803.

Address From General Washington[ George Washington], to the inhabitants of Canada, by General Arnolds[ Benedict Arnold], when he marched there.4:807. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Washington George,Arrives at Cambridge, and takes the command of the Army.4:761.
  • Washington George, his answer to the ad- dress[ address]of the Massachusetts Congress.4:Ib.
  • Washington George, his Letter to the Virgi- nian[ Virginian]independent Company's, on his ap- pointment[ appointment].4:780.

Washington George, his Address to the Canadians.4:807. see index

  • Washington George, his Letter's to General Gage[ Thomas Gage], on his treatment of Prisoners.4:816.
  • Washington George, his Speech to the Con- tinental[ Continental]Congress on his appointment, relinquishes his pay, saving for his Ex- pences[ expenses].4:869.
  • Washington George, his Answer to the address of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, on General Howe[ William Howe]s evacuating Boston.4:912.
  • Gage[ Thomas Gage]Governor, or General, his reply to Governor Trumbal[ Jonathan Trumbull]s Letter.4:730.
  • Gage[ Thomas Gage]Governor, or General, Issues a Proclamation against Rebellion, &c.4:750.
  • Gage[ Thomas Gage]Governor, or General, his Account of the Lexington Battle.4:792.

Gage[ Thomas Gage]Governor, or General, his reply to General Washington[ George Washington], respecting the treatment of Prisoners.4:816. see index

  • Gage[ Thomas Gage]Governor, or General, his Account of Bunker hill Fight.4:817.
  • Gage[ Thomas Gage]Governor, or General, his Answers to the addresses of the Inhabitants of Boston : the Mandamus Councellors, and Refugee Tories on his leaving Boston.4:827,4:828.
  • Gage[ Thomas Gage]Governor, or General, his Letter to Lord Dart- mouth[ Dartmouth], respecting his Letter to General Wash- ington[ George Washington], on the treatment of Prisoners.4:863.
  • Letter from General Burgoyne[ John Burgoyne], to General Lee, desire an interview, &c.4:776.
  • Letter from General Washington[ George Washington], to the independent Company's of Vir- ginia[ Virginia], on his taking the Command of the Continental Army.4:780
  • Letter from the Tories in Fal- mouth[ Falmouth], to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], on his go- ing[ going]to England.4:788.

Letter from General Washington[ George Washington], to General Gage[ Thomas Gage], and from Gage[ Thomas Gage]in reply, respecting the treatment of Pri- soners[ Prisoners].4:816. see index

  • Letter from General Gage[ Thomas Gage], containing an Account of Bunker Hill Fight.4:817.
  • Letter from General Bur- goyne[ John Burgoyne]to a Noble Lord containing an Account of Bunker Hill Fight.4:844.
  • Letter from General Montgomery[ Richard Montgomery], & Arnold[ Benedict Arnold], given an Account of the latters ex- pedition[ expedition]to Canada, published by order of the Continental Congress.4:861.
  • Washington George, his answer to the ad- dress[ address]of the Massachusetts Congress.4:Ib.
  • Washington George, his Letter to the Virgi- nian[ Virginian]independent Company's, on his ap- pointment[ appointment].4:780.
  • Washington George, his Address to the Canadians.4:807.

Washington George, his Letter's to General Gage[ Thomas Gage], on his treatment of Prisoners.4:816. see index

  • Washington George, his Speech to the Con- tinental[ Continental]Congress on his appointment, relinquishes his pay, saving for his Ex- pences[ expenses].4:869.
  • Washington George, his Answer to the address of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, on General Howe[ William Howe]s evacuating Boston.4:912.
  • Washington George, a great encomium on him, by the Assembly of Massachusetts Bay.4:Ib.
  • Gage[ Thomas Gage]Governor, or General, his reply to General Washington[ George Washington], respecting the treatment of Prisoners.4:816.
  • Gage[ Thomas Gage]Governor, or General, his Account of Bunker hill Fight.4:817.
  • Gage[ Thomas Gage]Governor, or General, his Answers to the addresses of the Inhabitants of Boston : the Mandamus Councellors, and Refugee Tories on his leaving Boston.4:827,4:828.

Gage[ Thomas Gage]Governor, or General, his Letter to Lord Dart- mouth[ Dartmouth], respecting his Letter to General Wash- ington[ George Washington], on the treatment of Prisoners.4:863. see index

  • Gold, the great hardships England un- dergoes[ undergoes], by an Act passed to prevent its passing without it is weighed.4:369.
  • Goal at Salem broken open, and the Prisoners confined for burning the Hospital, discharged. [diamond]4:455.
  • Graves Admiral, arrives, and Supercedes Admiral Montague.4:526.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Letter from General Gage[ Thomas Gage], to Lord Dartmouth, given him an account of General Washington[ George Washington]s Letter to him, respect- ing[ respecting]the treatment of Prisoners.4:863. see index

  • Letter from General Lee[ Charles Lee], to General Burgoyne[ John Burgoyne], on the latters going to England.4:865.
  • Letter Doctor Church[ Benjamin Church]'s traiterous one.4:867.
  • Letter from General Mont- gomery[ Richard Montgomery], to Governor Carlton[ Guy Carleton], on the Regulars firing on the formers flag of Truce, &c,4:879.
  • Commisssioners, for Settling the Line between New York, and this Province, return, have agreed, and settled it.4:295.
  • Commisssioners, appinted to settle the American dispute, being Lord & General Howe[ William Howe]: the terms, & c: the negociation came to nothing.4:979.4:1016,4:1019.
  • Commisssioners for Indians.4:800.

Commission from the Continent- al[ Continental]Congress, to General Washington[ George Washington].4:869. see index

  • Counties, Number of, in the Massachusetts Province.4:122.
  • Washington George, his Letter to the Virgi- nian[ Virginian]independent Company's, on his ap- pointment[ appointment].4:780.
  • Washington George, his Address to the Canadians.4:807.
  • Washington George, his Letter's to General Gage[ Thomas Gage], on his treatment of Prisoners.4:816.

Washington George, his Speech to the Con- tinental[ Continental]Congress on his appointment, relinquishes his pay, saving for his Ex- pences[ expenses].4:869. see index

  • Washington George, his Answer to the address of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, on General Howe[ William Howe]s evacuating Boston.4:912.
  • Washington George, a great encomium on him, by the Assembly of Massachusetts Bay.4:Ib.
  • Washington George, his answer to the address of Select- men[ Selectmen]of Boston, on the evacuation of it.4:913.
  • Address From the City of London, to the Electors of Great Britain, on the af- fairs[ affairs]of America, &c.4:857.
  • Address of the House of Commons, to the King; promise to support him in sub- duing[ subduing]America.4:882.
  • Address From the Author of Com- mon[ Common]sense, to the Quakers.4:911.

Address of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, to General Washington[ George Washington], on the Town of Boston 's being evacuated by the British Troops.4:912. see index

  • Address of the Selectmen of the Town of Boston, to the same, on the same.4:913.
  • Address of the city of Belfast to the King: beg he would be reconciled to the Colonies, &c.4:945.
  • Address Petition, &c, to the King, from the city of London, in behalf of America.4:956.
  • Assembly General new, of the Massachusetts Bay, convene.4:774.
  • Assembly General choose New Members for the Continental Congress.4:863.
  • Assembly General resolve against depreciating the Bills of Credit, &c.4:896.

Assembly General Their address to General Washington[ George Washington], on the evacuation of the Town of Boston by the British Troops.4:912. See Court. see index

  • Anarchy, not so dangerous as Tyranny.4:1238.
  • Act of the State of the Massachusetts bay prescribing an Oath of Fidelity, & Allegiance.4:1034.4:1068.
  • Act [diamond] to prevent the return of Tories.4:1067.
  • Washington George, his Address to the Canadians.4:807.
  • Washington George, his Letter's to General Gage[ Thomas Gage], on his treatment of Prisoners.4:816.
  • Washington George, his Speech to the Con- tinental[ Continental]Congress on his appointment, relinquishes his pay, saving for his Ex- pences[ expenses].4:869.

Washington George, his Answer to the address of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, on General Howe[ William Howe]s evacuating Boston.4:912. see index

  • Washington George, a great encomium on him, by the Assembly of Massachusetts Bay.4:Ib.
  • Washington George, his answer to the address of Select- men[ Selectmen]of Boston, on the evacuation of it.4:913.
  • Washington George, a Diploma of Doctor of Laws, conferred on him by the Harvard College.4:923.
  • Sayer Stephen, confined in the Tower of London for high treason.4:885.
  • Sayer Stephen, his Trial.4:1055.
  • Sayer Stephen, Prosecutes Earl Rochford.4:Ibid.

Selectmen of Boston, their address to General Washington[ George Washington], on the evacuation of Boston, &c.4:913. see index

  • See coulumn 1st under Selectmen of Bos- ton[ Boston], &c.
  • Swizerland[ Switzerland], History of that Country: extent of it. the Strug- gles[ Struggles]it has had to maintain its liberty, &c.4:952.
  • State of South Carolina : the British Troops, & Fleet defeated there.4:979,4:982,4:987,4:1007,4:1047.
  • Washington George, his Speech to the Con- tinental[ Continental]Congress on his appointment, relinquishes his pay, saving for his Ex- pences[ expenses].4:869.
  • Washington George, his Answer to the address of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, on General Howe[ William Howe]s evacuating Boston.4:912.
  • Washington George, a great encomium on him, by the Assembly of Massachusetts Bay.4:Ib.

Washington George, his answer to the address of Select- men[ Selectmen]of Boston, on the evacuation of it.4:913. see index

  • Washington George, a Diploma of Doctor of Laws, conferred on him by the Harvard College.4:923.
  • Washington George, Arrives at New York.4:925.
  • Washington George, Arrives at Philadelphia, from New York.4:949.
  • College Harvard, choose Doctor Cooper, who refuses.4:450.
  • College Harvard, choose Doctor Langdon, President.4:537.
  • College Harvard, Install him.4:600.

College Harvard, confer a degree of Doctor of Laws, on General Washington[ George Washington ]. See the diploma.4:923. see index

  • Commons House of In England, that Character drawn by Junius,4:27, &c,4:305,4:371.
  • Commons House of In England, Debates in it, respectinging the 39 Articles, &c.4:57.
  • Commons House of In England, an appeal to them in behalf of America.4:171.
  • Washington George, his Answer to the address of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, on General Howe[ William Howe]s evacuating Boston.4:912.
  • Washington George, a great encomium on him, by the Assembly of Massachusetts Bay.4:Ib.
  • Washington George, his answer to the address of Select- men[ Selectmen]of Boston, on the evacuation of it.4:913.

Washington George, a Diploma of Doctor of Laws, conferred on him by the Harvard College.4:923. see index

  • Washington George, Arrives at New York.4:925.
  • Washington George, Arrives at Philadelphia, from New York.4:949.
  • Washington George, entertained at New York ; his Answer to the address of that Conven- tion[ Convention].4:964.
  • Washington George, a great encomium on him, by the Assembly of Massachusetts Bay.4:Ib.
  • Washington George, his answer to the address of Select- men[ Selectmen]of Boston, on the evacuation of it.4:913.
  • Washington George, a Diploma of Doctor of Laws, conferred on him by the Harvard College.4:923.

Washington George, Arrives at New York.4:925. see index

  • Washington George, Arrives at Philadelphia, from New York.4:949.
  • Washington George, entertained at New York ; his Answer to the address of that Conven- tion[ Convention].4:964.
  • Washington George, his answer to the address of Select- men[ Selectmen]of Boston, on the evacuation of it.4:913.
  • Washington George, a Diploma of Doctor of Laws, conferred on him by the Harvard College.4:923.
  • Washington George, Arrives at New York.4:925.

Washington George, Arrives at Philadelphia, from New York.4:949. see index

  • Washington George, entertained at New York ; his Answer to the address of that Conven- tion[ Convention].4:964.

New York City of, Provincial Congress, return thanks to General Washington[ George Washington], and entertain him.4:964. See State of New York. see index

  • Names of the Grand Jury of the County of Suffolk, who would not find a bill against Mucious Scaevola, &c,4:33.
  • Names of those, killed, wounded, &c, in the Lexington Fight.4:723,4:792.
  • Names of the First Committee of Correspondence in Boston.4:1087.
  • Washington George, a Diploma of Doctor of Laws, conferred on him by the Harvard College.4:923.
  • Washington George, Arrives at New York.4:925.
  • Washington George, Arrives at Philadelphia, from New York.4:949.

Washington George, entertained at New York ; his Answer to the address of that Conven- tion[ Convention].4:964. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Congress Continental their resolves respecting the Militia of Pennsylvania, New Jer- sey[ Jersey], &c. to encourage the manufacturing of Flints, &c.4:976.
  • Congress Continental publish Lord Howe[ William Howe]'s circular letter, and his Declaration, on arri- ving[ arriving]in America.4:979.
  • Congress Continental publish General Lee[ Charles Lee]'s Letter, containing an account of the defeat of the enemy at South Carolina.4:Ibid.

Congress Continental resolve that they approve of General Washington[ George Washington]'s Conduct respecting the negociation with Lord How[ William Howe].4:982. see index

  • Congress Continental publish an account of it.4:984.
  • Congress Continental their resolve respecting the Cartel settled by General Arnold[ Benedict Arnold]: disapprove of it: will not abide by it, &c/4:Ibid.
  • Congress Continental resolve that papermakers be detained: that an exchange be made for Colonel Allen[ Ethan Allen]: and to take all Property on the Sea belonging to British Subjects, except, &c.4:985.
  • Resolves of the Conti- nental[ Continental]Congress, to remove all Stores that may in danger.4:968.
  • Resolves that all Persons pro- tected[ protected]in the Colonies owe allegiance to the same: and recommend to the respective Assemblies to pass Treason Acts.4:Ibid.
  • Resolves to encourage the Making of Flints: and respecting the Marching the Militia of Pennsylvania, & the Jersey 's, &c.4:976.

Resolves that they approve of General Washington[ George Washington]s behaviour[ behavior], respect- ing[ respecting]his negociation with Lord Howe[ William Howe].4:982. see index

  • Resolves disapprove of the Cartel settled by General Arnold[ Benedict Arnold]: are unwilling to abide by it, unless, &c.4:985.
  • Resolves that Paper Makers be detained: that an exchange be made for Colonel Allen[ Ethan Allen]: and to take all pro- perty[ property]on the Sea, belonging to any sub- ject[ subject]of King George, except Burmudas, and new Providence.4:985.
  • Resolves to give encouragement to the Army, and (Army say) Navy, in case any of them are wounded, &c,4:1007.
  • Washington George, his proclamation, for the sick,&c of the city of New York, to withdraw, as a bombardment is expected.4:997.
  • Washington George, his Letter to Lord Howe[ William Howe], respecting an exchange of Prisoners.4:1004.

Washington George, his behaviour[ behavior]approvd.[ approved]by the Continental Congress, repecting a conference with General Howe[ William Howe].*4:982. see index

  • Wool, the great hardship's the Colonies labour[ labor]under, by the restraint on it, as to transportation, &c.4:1112.
  • * Washington George, chairman of the first meeting of Freeholders in Virginia.4:545.
  • Washington George, Chosen a Member of their Great Assembly, and a delegate to meet in convention4:546.
  • New Providence, dis- mantled[ dismantled]by the United Colonies Fleet.4:923.

Negociation between Lord Howe[ William Howe], and General Washington[ George Washington].4:984. see index

  • Negociation between Lord Howe[ William Howe], and the Continental Congress: the Terms, &c, came to nothing.4:1015,4:1019.
  • Nature State of, what liberty those in that state ought to enjoy.4:1092,
  • Nanture State of the great inconveni- ency's[ inconveniency's]attending it.4:1128.
  • Proclamation a Fast.4:892.
  • Proclamation of General Howe[ William Howe], permitting inhabitants to removew from Boston.4:851.
  • Proclamation of General Clinton[ Henry Clinton]'s in North Carolina, forbidding all Con- gresse's[ Congresses]to set, &c, &c, &c.4:964.

Proclamation of General Washington[ George Washington], for the sick, &c, to remove from New York, as he expects a bombardment, &c.4:997. See Declaration. see index

  • Parliament of Great Britian, has no right to make any law to bind the Colonies, &c, unless they consent.4:15.
  • Parliament their right to regulate trade in the Colonies, never yet been dis- puted[ disputed].4:17.
  • Parliament an enquiry into their power over the Colonies.4:226,4:229,4:250,4:257.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Washington George, his proclamation, for the sick,&c of the city of New York, to withdraw, as a bombardment is expected.4:997. see index

  • Washington George, his Letter to Lord Howe[ William Howe], respecting an exchange of Prisoners.4:1004.
  • Washington George, his behaviour[ behavior]approvd.[ approved]by the Continental Congress, repecting a conference with General Howe[ William Howe].*4:982.
  • Wool, the great hardship's the Colonies labour[ labor]under, by the restraint on it, as to transportation, &c.4:1112.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Congress Continent- al[ Continental], order General Washington[ George Washington]'s Letter to Lord Howe, respecting the exchange of pri- soners[ prisoners]: and Mr. Josiah in particular, be published.4:1004. see index

  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], resolve, that great encourage- ment[ encouragement]be giving to Officers, and Soldiers in the Army, and Navy: and publish an account of Long Islands Affair.4:1007.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], resolve relative to Post Riders, &c.4:1011.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], publish all the Letters, and Papers, respecting the negociation with the Commissioners, Lord & General Howe[ William].4:1015.
  • Howe[ William Howe]General, Issues three Proclamation's, forbiding the carrying Money out of Boston : to form as association: &c,4:829.
  • Howe[ William Howe]General, Issues a Procla- mation[ Proclamation]for Boston inhabitants to depart.4:851. See Proclamation's.
  • Howe[ William Howe]General, Lord, Arrives at New York as Admiral; and with his Brother, a Commissioner to grant Pardons, &c.4:776,4:973.

Howe[ William Howe]General, Washington respecting an exchange of Prisoners, &c,4:1004. see index

  • Howe[ William Howe]General, General, and Governor Tryon[ William Tryon]'s Letters to Lord Germaine, con- taining[ containing]the situation of their affairs at New York, &c.4:1040.
  • Hanged, a person in Germany was, for endeavoring to ruin his Country.4:317.
  • Holden, See Town of.
  • Washington George, his proclamation, for the sick,&c of the city of New York, to withdraw, as a bombardment is expected.4:997.

Washington George, his Letter to Lord Howe[ William Howe], respecting an exchange of Prisoners.4:1004. see index

  • Washington George, his behaviour[ behavior]approvd.[ approved]by the Continental Congress, repecting a conference with General Howe[ William Howe].*4:982.
  • Wool, the great hardship's the Colonies labour[ labor]under, by the restraint on it, as to transportation, &c.4:1112.
  • * Washington George, chairman of the first meeting of Freeholders in Virginia.4:545.
  • Engagement at New York.4:1006.
  • Engagement of the United Fleet at Lake Champlain : are totally defeated.4:1029.
  • Engagement from the time of the evacu- ating[ evacuating]New York, &c, a journal of.4:1036.

Engagement at Fort Washington, &c,4:1048,4:1053. see index

  • See under Canada; Troops British; Ar- my[ Army]British, &c, Army of the United Colonies, &c Soldiers, &c.
  • Fort Chamblee[ Chambly]capitulation of it.4:843. See Canada, & Saint Johns.
  • Fort Chamblee[ Chambly]or Battery, will at any time (even with a single Gun) dislodge any Ship of War, and burn it also.4:999.
  • Fort Chamblee[ Chambly]Built in the Harbour[ Harbor]of Boston.4:933,4:956,4:957.

Fort Chamblee[ Chambly]Washington[ George Washington]taken.4:1048,4:1053. see index

  • Fort Chamblee[ Chambly]Lee[ Charles Lee]taken.4:Ib.
  • Frigate Launched at Portsmouth.4:950.
  • Frigate at Newburyport4:953.4:969,
  • Troops British, defeated at South Caro- lina[ Carolina].4:979,4:982,4:987,4:1007,4:1043.
  • Troops British, defeated at Virginia, under Lord Dunsmore.4:987.
  • Troops British, take the City of New York.4:1012,4:1017.

Troops British, take Fort Washington.4:1048,4:1053. see index

  • Troops British, land on the Jersey shore.4:Ibid.
  • Troops British, advancing to Philadelphia ; see the hand Bill published by the Commit- tee[ Committee]of Safety there.4:1057.
  • Troops British, take Rhode Island -4:1060,4:1061,4:1065.
  • [no preceding index entries]

(a) Army of the United Colo- nies[ Colonies], formed under General Washington[ George Washington]at Cambridge ; their proceedings, viz. (a) see index

  • Army of the United Colo- nies[ Colonies]entrench at plow Hill, &c,4:793.
  • Army of the United Colo- nies[ Colonies]at Cobble Hill.4:847.
  • Army of the United Colo- nies[ Colonies]their proceedings.4:855.4:859.4:871,4:890,4:897,4:901,4:905.
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], Appoint Gentlman to repair to Canada, to form an Army.4:851.
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], their remarks on the King's Proclamation.4:859.
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], new Members chosen by the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay.4:863.

Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], Establish they pay of Officers, and appoint the General Officers in the Continental Army and publish General Washington[ George Washington]s Commis- sion[ Commission]. 869. see index

  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], Establish an Hospital, with the Officers pay.4:874.
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], resolve against those who refuse to take the Continental money.4:882.
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], their account of the defeat of their Troops in Canada.4:886.
  • * Washington George, chairman of the first meeting of Freeholders in Virginia.4:545.
  • Washington George, Chosen a Member of their Great Assembly, and a delegate to meet in convention4:546.
  • Washington George, and a Member of Congress ( Conti nental[ Continental],) Page4:560

Washington George, His name first brought into fame page 1073, Vol.2. see index

  • Civil War, when in England.4:1266.

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