Search the Indexes

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This tool searches Harbottle Dorr, Jr.'s indexes only. It does not search the text of newspapers or pamphlets or Dorr's annotations.

Detailed explanation of search results

The default scope of the search tool is to search for the requested word/words within the index terms of all four volumes simultaneously. Search results will be presented as one list of index terms ordered by volume and page number from all four volumes containing the requested search terms. To search for a word or words within one of the indexes for a specific volume, select that particular volume from the drop down box within the search form. [Reminder: to browse (rather than search) any of the four indexes, please start at the Collection Outline.]

Each index entry listed on the search results page is structured as follows:

  • The indexed term(s).
  • A linked-number: Clicking this takes you to the specific volume and page number that Dorr indexed. At this time, users must read the individual newspaper page to find the indexed content.
  • The blue, double-arrow : Click this to see an expanded view that shows each term in the context of the terms Dorr wrote above and below on the original index page.
  • "See index" see index: Clicking this will take you to the original index page in which this search term appeared.

The search feature also automatically returns truncated words without the use of wildcard symbols. For example, if you search for "draw" you will also see "draws" and "drawing"; "sell" shows "selling" and "sellers"; and "address" displays "addresses", "addressed", "addressing".

Examples

example of searching `thunder`

When you search for the word "thunder" you should see thirteen results. The first result – "Thunder Terrible at Boston" – is followed by the numbers "2:191," indicating that Dorr indexed an article that appeared in Volume 2, on Page 191.

In the list of search results, if you click on the blue-double arrow you see an expanded view of the search term in the context of the other terms on Dorr’s index page. See below:

example of searching `thunder`

When you follow the link for the first result (“Thunder Terrible at Boston”), and click on “2:191” you will be taken to the page Dorr numbered 191 within volume 2. You will need to read the newspaper to determine which article prompted Dorr to create the index term. To the right of the blue, double-arrow is a link labeled "see index". Clicking this will take you to the original index page in which the searched word(s)/phrase appears.


Searching for the keyword "king" in all volumes:

  • [no preceding index entries]

Duel an Intended one between King George[ King George II]and King Prussia[ Frederick William I] 1:30 see index

  • Drowned Bodies recover'd[ recovered] 1:73
  • Drowned Bodies recover'd[ recovered]vid page,1:57
  • Disorders. Great in England1:141
  • Colden[ Cadwallader Colden]Governor Resentment against him1:368
  • Critical Reviews Extract from1:352
  • Critical Reviews Censur'd[ Censured] 1:359

Congress. their Address. Men and Petition to King, Lords & Commons1:38 see index

  • Councellors Negativ'd[ Negatived] 1:422 1:658
  • Councellors address to Governor Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard] 1:433
  • Councellors Message to the House wherein they deny Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]right to set in Council1:606
  • Vision on Nathaniel Wheelwrights failing Page1:17

Virginia Assembly's address to the King1:45 see index

  • Virginia Assembly's Memorial to House Lords1:Ibid
  • Virginia Assembly's Remonstrance to House Commons1:Ibid
  • Virginia Assembly's Resolves1:116
  • Whitefields[ George Whitefields]account audited1:55
  • Williams John. his Sentence Executed1:72
  • Wild Beast a Ficticious one in France1:83. 1:91. 1:124

Weavers Journey Man their Distress Complain to the King1:129 see index

  • Wigglesworth Edward Inaugurated1:250
  • Waterhouse Samuel his Declaration1:334
  • Write of Assistance one given
  • Armstrong Freeborn[ James Otis], remark's[ remarks]on the to the Council about the Court of Justice1:328
  • Armstrong Freeborn[ James Otis]Answer to ye[ the]Council1:333
  • Address from Heaven by an Angel1:336

Address of House of Lords to the Kings Speech about America &c1:340 1:371. see index

  • Address of House Commons1:Ibid. 1:Ibid.
  • Anecdote of Sir Robert Walpole about Taxing America 344
  • Address to America to persevere in opposing the Stamp Act1:349
  • [no preceding index entries]

Kings Speech concerning America1:340. 1:371 see index

  • Kings Address to him from Massachusetts Bay1:550
  • King of Denmark[ Christian VII]marries Carolina Matilda the Kings Sister1:552 1:553

Barnard Governor[ Sir Francis Bernard]Speech to General Court, Charges them with oppugnation to the Kings Authority &c1:422 see index

  • Barnard Governor[ Sir Francis Bernard]to General Court Censures them and desires Requisition to be made to the Sufferers.1:427
  • Dialogue Between Lubbin and Sawney1:618
  • Disenters[ Dissenters]affair settled in the House of Lords (b)1:632
  • Determinatus's Challenge to Great Britain1:724

Address of A M Bay to ye[ the]King1:550 see index

  • (A) Brought Forward1:794
  • Address to Inhabitants of Massachusetts Bay1:380. 1:396
  • Advertisement Extraordinary on the Rejoycing[ Rejoicing]for Repeal1:386
  • Kings Speech concerning America1:340. 1:371

Kings Address to him from Massachusetts Bay1:550 see index

  • King of Denmark[ Christian VII]marries Carolina Matilda the Kings Sister1:552 1:553
  • Representatives of Massachusetts Bay Answer to Governor Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard]about Compensation to Sufferers1:443
  • Representatives of Massachusetts Bay Commended for Their Conduct relative to the Compensation &c1:460
  • Representatives of Massachusetts Bay Address to Governor Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard] 1:534

Representatives of Massachusetts Bay Address to the King1:550 see index

  • Representatives of Massachusetts Bay Answer to the Governor Speech wherein they find fault with Governor Hutchinson[ Hutchinson]setting[ sitting]in Council1:581
  • Representatives of Massachusetts Bay Remonstrance to Governor about drawing money out of Treasury1:586
  • Representatives of Massachusetts Bay Answer to the Governor Speech wherein they deny Governor Hutchinsons[ Thomas Hutchinson]right to sett[ sit]in Council1:581
  • Kings Speech concerning America1:340. 1:371
  • Kings Address to him from Massachusetts Bay1:550

King of Denmark[ Christian VII]marries Carolina Matilda the Kings Sister1:552 1:553 see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Barnard Governor[ Sir Francis Bernard]Speech to the General Court1:581
  • Barnard Governor[ Sir Francis Bernard]Message to the House about Hutschinsons[ Thomas Hutchinson]Right to sett in Council1:589 1:598
  • Barnard Governor[ Sir Francis Bernard]Message to the House Recommends the paying Agent Jackson1:591

Barnard Governor[ Sir Francis Bernard]Message Justifies the Making Provisions for the Kings Troops1:596 see index

  • Barnard Governor[ Sir Francis Bernard]Message to the House about Palliser[ Hugh Pallisers]Charge1:601
  • Barnard Governor[ Sir Francis Bernard]Speech to the General Court1:658.vide it Ridicul'd[ Ridiculed] 1:659
  • Barbadoes a Great Fire at1:435. 1:444. 1:591
  • Advertisement Extraordinary on the Rejoycing[ Rejoicing]for Repeal1:386
  • Anecdote of Pitt1:493
  • America resentment against her1:667. 1:670.

Act of Indemnity not Approved of by King &c1:667 1:742 see index

  • Acts of passed with regard to America Imposing duties &c1:676
  • America. a Prophet to seize all they've[ they have]got an Ironical peice[ piece] 1:686
  • America's Address to the Mother Country1:716
  • Manufacturing American to be kept from1:1
  • Manufacturing Ditto1:Ibid
  • Manufacturing Ditto1:5

Manufacturing New England Complaints of No New King1:Ibid see index

  • Manufacturing have been in Ameri.a[ America]for a long Time past1:Ibid
  • Manufacturers. Endeavours[ Endeavors]to Impose duties on1:60
  • Manufacturers. A Droll account of in America1:65. 1:84
  • Patriot Found in Disguise1:788
  • Paper Manufacture ought to be encouraged1:756
  • Petition to Parlament[ Parliament]against the Stamp Act rejected1:419

Petition of the House of Representatives of the Massachusetts Bay to the King, against the Act Impo- sing[ Imposing]Duties, See Massachusetts Bay under Letter M. see index

  • Petition of the Representatives of Virginia to the King praying that the Statute of Henry 8th may not be extended to Ameri- ca.[ America] 2:540.
  • Parliamentary Power Extent of an excellent essay on.2:26. 2:29. 2:54.
  • Pensioners more formidable to a free People than Troops.2:31

Parliament King Charles 1 without one, 12 or 13 years2:33. see index

  • Parliament Speech in, by Mr. Bourke, wherein he calls our Assemblies Parliaments.2:370.
  • Parliaments our Assemblies Our Assemblies called so by Mr Bourke2:Ibid
  • Puritan Witty peices of his about Popery, meaning the Town's sending bad Represen- tatives.[ Representatives] 2:61. 2:67. 2:77.
  • Pimps and Cook's appointed to Places in America2:21.
  • Petition of the Clergy of New Jersey &c, for a Bishop.2:22.

Petition of the House of Representatives of the Massachusetts Bay to the King about the Revenue Acts &c.2:51. see index

  • Petition of the Represen- tatives[ Representatives]of New Jersey to the King on the Same, and the Circular Letter.2:180.
  • Petition of the House of Representatives of the Massachusetts Bay to the King against Governor Barnard.[ Sir Francis Bernard] 2:190.
  • Petition of the House of Representatives of Pen- sylvania[ Pennsylvania]to the House of Commons.2:407.
  • Representatives of the Province Their Answer to Governor Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard]s Speech about the libel.2:39.
  • Representatives of the Province Their Circular Letter to the Speakers of the Houses of Representatives on the Conti- nent.[ Continent] 2:43
  • Representatives of the Province Their Letter to Lord Shelburne about the Revenue Acts. &c.2:47.

Representatives of the Province Their petition to the King praying relief concerning the Revenue Acts Regulations. &c2:51. see index

  • Representatives of the Province Their Letter to General Conway on the same.2:55.
  • Representatives of the Province Their letter to Agent Debert on the same. &c.2:59.
  • Representatives of the Province Their Letter to Lord Camden on the same2:63.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Kings Speech is glad to see the Americans returning to their duty2:108 see index

  • Kings Speech wherein he calls the American uneasinesses a Faction, and Charges Boston with Actions amounting to Re- bellion.[ Rebellion] 2:363
  • Kings Remarked on by Briton2:618
  • Kings Answer to the address of the House of Lords, wherein they desire him to Extend the Statute of Harry 8th to America2:477.
  • Pimps and Cook's appointed to Places in America2:21.
  • Petition of the Clergy of New Jersey &c, for a Bishop.2:22.
  • Petition of the House of Representatives of the Massachusetts Bay to the King about the Revenue Acts &c.2:51.

Petition of the Represen- tatives[ Representatives]of New Jersey to the King on the Same, and the Circular Letter.2:180. see index

  • Petition of the House of Representatives of the Massachusetts Bay to the King against Governor Barnard.[ Sir Francis Bernard] 2:190.
  • Petition of the House of Representatives of Pen- sylvania[ Pennsylvania]to the House of Commons.2:407.
  • Petition To the House of Lords.2:Ibid.
  • Petition of the Clergy of New Jersey &c, for a Bishop.2:22.
  • Petition of the House of Representatives of the Massachusetts Bay to the King about the Revenue Acts &c.2:51.
  • Petition of the Represen- tatives[ Representatives]of New Jersey to the King on the Same, and the Circular Letter.2:180.

Petition of the House of Representatives of the Massachusetts Bay to the King against Governor Barnard.[ Sir Francis Bernard] 2:190. see index

  • Petition of the House of Representatives of Pen- sylvania[ Pennsylvania]to the House of Commons.2:407.
  • Petition To the House of Lords.2:Ibid.
  • Petition of the Represen- tatives[ Representatives]of New York to the King.2:468.
  • Parliament dis so lve d[ dissolved] 2:108
  • Parliament of Great Bri tain[ Britain]have the Supreme Leg is lative[ Legislative]power, and can regula and preserve the connections between all British Subje

Parliament If the King refuses to call one who may2:254 see index

  • Popish Priest ordanied ordained by the Bishop of Canada for Nova Scotia with a Salary 74
  • President of Harvard College, Reverend Mr Samuel Lock, Chose. 78
  • Planets, what & how many &c
  • Parliament dis so lve d[ dissolved] 2:108
  • Parliament of Great Bri tain[ Britain]have the Supreme Leg is lative[ Legislative]power, and can regula and preserve the connections between all British Subje

Parliament If the King refuses to call one who may2:254 see index

  • Popish Priest ordanied ordained by the Bishop of Canada for Nova Scotia with a Salary 74[pg # gone]
  • President of Harvard College, Reverend Mr Samuel Lock, Chose. 78[pg # gone]
  • Planets, what & how many &c[pg # gone]
  • Scotch Mens advertise- ment[ advertisement], about disposing of their Goods.2:692.
  • South Carolina, House of Representatives, refuse to raise money for the Kings Troops2:690. 2:745
  • Scotland, Number of Souls there2:207.

Stamp Act, as alarming to America, as King James 2d dispensing power2:276 see index

  • Slavery, he that would enslave, would also kill Me, were it in his Power2:661
  • Suns, or fixed Stars, their appearance continually encrea- sing[ increasing], proves that there are millions of habitable Words2:679. 2:702. 2:705
  • Storm great at Boston, Tide higher than has been for 20 years.2:341.
  • Kings Speech is glad to see the Americans returning to their duty2:108

Kings Speech wherein he calls the American uneasinesses a Faction, and Charges Boston with Actions amounting to Re- bellion.[ Rebellion] 2:363 see index

  • Kings Remarked on by Briton2:618
  • Kings Answer to the address of the House of Lords, wherein they desire him to Extend the Statute of Harry 8th to America2:477.
  • Kings Speech to the Parliament.2:588
  • Anecdote, about a riot suppressd by Lord Chief Justice Holt.[ John Holt] 2:279. 2:600
  • Americans, must finally be represented in Parliament2:315. 2:470.
  • Americans Their Grievances similar to those contained in the Middlesex petition.2:632

Address of the Lords to the Kings Speech, wherein he calls the American Grievances a Faction.2:372. see index

  • Address of the Lords of the Commons on the same.2:372.
  • Address of the Lords To the young Ladies of Boston, desiring them to beware of bad Company.2:386.
  • Address of the Lords of the Town of Boston 2 addresses to Governor Barnard.2:415
  • Convention of the Towns of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay Their result.2:257
  • Convention of the Towns Their Letter to Agent Debert.2:265
  • Chamomile Tea its Virtues.2:286

Commons British House [diamond] of, their address to the Kings Speech, wherein he calls the uneasiness of the Americans a faction.2:372 see index

  • Commons British House of, Debates in.2:370. 2:399.
  • Commons British House of, Their Resolves against the Massachusetts Bay.2:468.
  • Courts [compass] of Admiralty Special, vide, Admiralty.
  • Letter Letter an excellent One to Lord Hillsborough.[ Wills Hill] 2:947.to2:1000.
  • Liberty Song.2:166.
  • Liberty Song Parodized.2:252.

Lords, address to the Kings Speech, in answer to his, wherein he call's the American Factious.2:372. see index

  • Libelling on, an extract from Cato's Letters.2:424.
  • Lutterell Colonel chose a Member in opposition to Mr Wilkes.2:535.
  • Lutterell Colonel Admitted as a Mem- ber[ Member]of the House of Commons in the Room of Mr. Wilkes.[ John Wilkes] 2:538. 2:550
  • Letter in Answer to the Farmer2:392. 2:400. 2:414. 2:414.Twice paged,2:438. 2:446. 2:454. 2:461. 2:507. 2:518. 2:526.
  • Letter From the Merchants and Traders in Phildelphia to the Merchants and manu- facturers[ manufacturers]in England, showing them, that unless the revenue Acts are repealed they much stop the Importation of Goods.2:401.
  • Letter From Elzevir a Comical One.2:419

Letter An Excellent One, shewing[ showing]the methods of our enemies makes use of to blac- king[ blacking]us, and highly commends the Journal of the Times.2:421. see index

  • Letter From the Speaker of the House of Assembly of North Carolina to the Speaker of the House of the Massachusetts Bay, approving of the Circular Letter.2:436.
  • Letter To the Author of the Answer to the Farmers Letters.2:442.
  • Letter to Reverend Samuel Seabury, vindicating Doctor Chauncy.2:447.
  • Petition of the House of Representatives of the Massachusetts Bay to the King against Governor Barnard.[ Sir Francis Bernard] 2:190.
  • Petition of the House of Representatives of Pen- sylvania[ Pennsylvania]to the House of Commons.2:407.
  • Petition To the House of Lords.2:Ibid.

Petition of the Represen- tatives[ Representatives]of New York to the King.2:468. see index

  • Petition To the House of Commons in behalf of the Massachusetts Bay about extending the Act of Henry 8th to America. from William Bollan.2:471.
  • Petition of Jacob Parsons a deputy Sheriff to the Governor and Council about Fellows firing on him. &c.2:511
  • Petition of the Town of Boston to the King2:588.
  • York Town of thanks the Antirescinders.2:243.
  • York New a Letter from the Speaker of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, approving the Circular Letter.2:364.

York New Their petition to the King.2:468. see index

  • York New Duration of their Assembly.2:31
  • Z
  • Address of Sargeant Glyn's promis- ses[ promises]the County of Middlesex he will enquire into the Murders committed at his Election2:421. 2:428.
  • Address to Doctor Chauncy[ Charles Chauncey]by Reverend Samuel Seabury2:427.

Address of the Lords to the King on their Resolution to extend the Statute of Harry the 8th to America.2:472 see index

  • Address From the Merchants and Traders of the City of London to the King.2:486
  • Address of the Council of Virginia to Lord Bottetourt's[ Norborne Berkeley]Speech.2:531
  • Address of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, on the Same.2:534.
  • Kings Speech is glad to see the Americans returning to their duty2:108
  • Kings Speech wherein he calls the American uneasinesses a Faction, and Charges Boston with Actions amounting to Re- bellion.[ Rebellion] 2:363
  • Kings Remarked on by Briton2:618

Kings Answer to the address of the House of Lords, wherein they desire him to Extend the Statute of Harry 8th to America2:477. see index

  • Kings Speech to the Parliament.2:588
  • Kings and Queens of Great Britain and England an Account of.[ref. missing]
  • Kings, their Epithet's, and when they began their Reigns.2:722
  • Address of Sargeant Glyn's promis- ses[ promises]the County of Middlesex he will enquire into the Murders committed at his Election2:421. 2:428.
  • Address to Doctor Chauncy[ Charles Chauncey]by Reverend Samuel Seabury2:427.
  • Address of the Lords to the King on their Resolution to extend the Statute of Harry the 8th to America.2:472

Address From the Merchants and Traders of the City of London to the King.2:486 see index

  • Address of the Council of Virginia to Lord Bottetourt's[ Norborne Berkeley]Speech.2:531
  • Address of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, on the Same.2:534.
  • Address to the City of Bristol, urging them to take Care of their Liberties.2:709
  • [no preceding index entries]

Petition of the Representatives of Virginia to the King praying that the Statute of Henry 8th may not be extended to Ameri- ca.[ America] 2:540. see index

  • Parliamentary Power Extent of an excellent essay on.2:26. 2:29. 2:54.
  • Pensioners more formidable to a free People than Troops.2:31
  • Parliament King Charles 1 without one, 12 or 13 years2:33.
  • Representatives may sue for their wages, Andrew Marvel did so2:193
  • Representatives House of South Carolina refuses to vote Money for ye[ the]Kings Troops2:690. 2:745.

Representatives House of Virginia Their Address to the King, praying him not to extend the Statute of Harry 8th to America2:540 see index

  • Reformation in Eng- land[ England], how it first began2:107.
  • Russia War. &c2:667
  • Rioters in St. George's Field Fired upon by the Soldiers, and Several Person's Killed2:180
  • Venus. Transit of.2:525.
  • Virginia Inhabitants of, their Agreement, after their Assembly was dissolved. &c.2:534.
  • Votes of the Town of Boston respecting the Troops.2:571.

Virginia House of Bur- gesses[ Burgesses]their address to the King praying him not to Act on the Statue of Harry 8th, with regard to America.2:540 see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Boston Choose Representa- tives[ Representatives], their proceedings before and after the choice.2:494
  • Boston Vindicated.2:513
  • Boston Their proceedings about the Troops tarrying in Boston &c2:571

Boston Petition to the King.2:588 see index

  • Boston Meets and chooses a Committee to Answer, Bar- nard[ Sir Francis Bernard]& Gages[ Thomas Gage]Letters.2:697
  • Boston Their Votes with regard to the Importers.2:Ibid.
  • Boston Vindicated from the Aspersions of Governor Bar- nard[ Sir Francis Bernard]Gage[ Thomas Gage], &c.2:1001to2:1040
  • Kings Speech wherein he calls the American uneasinesses a Faction, and Charges Boston with Actions amounting to Re- bellion.[ Rebellion] 2:363
  • Kings Remarked on by Briton2:618
  • Kings Answer to the address of the House of Lords, wherein they desire him to Extend the Statute of Harry 8th to America2:477.

Kings Speech to the Parliament.2:588 see index

  • Kings and Queens of Great Britain and England an Account of.[ref. missing]
  • Kings, their Epithet's, and when they began their Reigns.2:722
  • Petition of the Represen- tatives[ Representatives]of New York to the King.2:468.
  • Petition To the House of Commons in behalf of the Massachusetts Bay about extending the Act of Henry 8th to America. from William Bollan.2:471.
  • Petition of Jacob Parsons a deputy Sheriff to the Governor and Council about Fellows firing on him. &c.2:511

Petition of the Town of Boston to the King2:588. see index

  • Petition of the County of Middlesex to the King2:596.
  • Petition of the House of Representatives of the Massa. Bay to the King, Impeaching Governor Barnard.[ Sir Francis Bernard] 2:649.
  • Petition of the city of London to the King.2:Ibid.
  • Manufactory Hall the Tenants wont[ will not]deliver it up to the Troops vide the proceedings about it.2:281.
  • Murray Justice about the Journal of the Times.2:521.
  • Murray Justice a Letter to him on the same2:524. 2:531.

Middlesex County of, their Petition to the King.2:596. see index

  • Maccaulay Mrs her History of England highly commended.2:650. 2:721.
  • Moor, Sir Henry's Death and Character.2:677.
  • Merchants and Traders commended for their conduct.2:730.
  • Petition To the House of Commons in behalf of the Massachusetts Bay about extending the Act of Henry 8th to America. from William Bollan.2:471.
  • Petition of Jacob Parsons a deputy Sheriff to the Governor and Council about Fellows firing on him. &c.2:511
  • Petition of the Town of Boston to the King2:588.

Petition of the County of Middlesex to the King2:596. see index

  • Petition of the House of Representatives of the Massa. Bay to the King, Impeaching Governor Barnard.[ Sir Francis Bernard] 2:649.
  • Petition of the city of London to the King.2:Ibid.
  • Petition of the House of Representatives to the King from Georgia.2:725
  • Kings Speech is glad to see the Americans returning to their duty2:108
  • Kings Speech wherein he calls the American uneasinesses a Faction, and Charges Boston with Actions amounting to Re- bellion.[ Rebellion] 2:363

Kings Remarked on by Briton2:618 see index

  • Kings Answer to the address of the House of Lords, wherein they desire him to Extend the Statute of Harry 8th to America2:477.
  • Kings Speech to the Parliament.2:588
  • Kings and Queens of Great Britain and England an Account of.[ref. missing]
  • North Britain Shews[ Shows]the great Importance of the Dissenting Party to the British Constitution.2:295
  • North Britain Remarks on Kings Speech2:618
  • Newcastle Duke of his Death and Character.2:373

Newcastle Remarks on Kings Speeach2:618 see index

  • North Carolina, House of Assembly their Letter to the Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Massachusetts bay, approving the Circular Letter.2:436.
  • Number of Polls & Souls in Massachusetts Bay,2:227. 2:639
  • Number of Polls & Souls in New England2:207. 2:639
  • Number of Souls in Canada2:227. 2:639. 2:969. 2:13
  • North Britain gives the Character of Lord Hillsborugh.[ Wills Hill]*2:261.
  • North Britain Shews[ Shows]the great Importance of the Dissenting Party to the British Constitution.2:295

North Britain Remarks on Kings Speech2:618 see index

  • Newcastle Duke of his Death and Character.2:373
  • Newcastle Remarks on Kings Speeach2:618
  • North Carolina, House of Assembly their Letter to the Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Massachusetts bay, approving the Circular Letter.2:436.
  • Petition of Jacob Parsons a deputy Sheriff to the Governor and Council about Fellows firing on him. &c.2:511
  • Petition of the Town of Boston to the King2:588.
  • Petition of the County of Middlesex to the King2:596.

Petition of the House of Representatives of the Massa. Bay to the King, Impeaching Governor Barnard.[ Sir Francis Bernard] 2:649. see index

  • Petition of the city of London to the King.2:Ibid.
  • Petition of the House of Representatives to the King from Georgia.2:725
  • Representatives may sue for their wages, Andrew Marvel did so2:193

Representatives House of South Carolina refuses to vote Money for ye[ the]Kings Troops2:690. 2:745. see index

  • Representatives House of Virginia Their Address to the King, praying him not to extend the Statute of Harry 8th to America2:540
  • Reformation in Eng- land[ England], how it first began2:107.
  • Russia War. &c2:667
  • Statute De Tallagio non concedendo.2:814.
  • Sun. the Distance of from the Earth.2:680.
  • Scotch Mens advertise- ment[ advertisement], about disposing of their Goods.2:692.

South Carolina, House of Representatives, refuse to raise money for the Kings Troops2:690. 2:745 see index

  • Scotland, Number of Souls there2:207.
  • Stamp Act, as alarming to America, as King James 2d dispensing power2:276
  • Slavery, he that would enslave, would also kill Me, were it in his Power2:661
  • Paper. Materials enough in America to make it of Tow &c. how it is made &c.2:340. 2:357. 2:395. 2:455.
  • Pensylvania[ Pennsylvania]House of Representatives Their Resolves.2:563.
  • Plague the great, in London, a particular Narra- tive[ Narrative]of it.2:717.

Petitions to the King and Account of them.2:718. see index

  • Pitt William Lord Chatham his Character drawn by Mr Wilkes.[ John Wilkes] 2:728
  • Petition of the County of Wilts to the King.2:738.
  • Petition From the County of Surry[ Surrey]to the King.2:738. 2:742.
  • Kings Answer to the address of the House of Lords, wherein they desire him to Extend the Statute of Harry 8th to America2:477.
  • Kings Speech to the Parliament.2:588
  • Kings and Queens of Great Britain and England an Account of.[ref. missing]

Kings, their Epithet's, and when they began their Reigns.2:722 see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Gage[ Thomas Gage]General Indicted.2:1039
  • Grenville George his American Account.2:476
  • Gridley Jonathan his Declaration about Otis and Robinsons affray.2:665

Georgia House of Assembly, Petition to the King.2:725 see index

  • Grafton Duke of blamed, for his administration, especially with regard to America.2:737
  • Grafton Duke of Attempted to be bribed by S. Vaughan.2:738
  • Georgia, Inhabitants of, their agreement about oeconomy[ economy]. &c2:740
  • Petition of the County of Middlesex to the King2:596.
  • Petition of the House of Representatives of the Massa. Bay to the King, Impeaching Governor Barnard.[ Sir Francis Bernard] 2:649.
  • Petition of the city of London to the King.2:Ibid.

Petition of the House of Representatives to the King from Georgia.2:725 see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Petitions to the King and Account of them.2:718.
  • Pitt William Lord Chatham his Character drawn by Mr Wilkes.[ John Wilkes] 2:728
  • Petition of the County of Wilts to the King.2:738.

Petition From the County of Surry[ Surrey]to the King.2:738. 2:742. see index

  • Petition From Westminster.2:Ibid. 2:742
  • Petition From the City of Worcester.2:758.
  • Petition of Right2:816.
  • Plague the great, in London, a particular Narra- tive[ Narrative]of it.2:717.
  • Petitions to the King and Account of them.2:718.
  • Pitt William Lord Chatham his Character drawn by Mr Wilkes.[ John Wilkes] 2:728

Petition of the County of Wilts to the King.2:738. see index

  • Petition From the County of Surry[ Surrey]to the King.2:738. 2:742.
  • Petition From Westminster.2:Ibid. 2:742
  • Petition From the City of Worcester.2:758.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Letter to the King from Timothy Pickering.2:746. see index

  • Letter From the Speaker of the House of Representa- tives[ Representatives]of the Massachusetts Bay to Agent Debert, given him an Account of the riot of the Soldiers at Justice Quincy's.2:774.
  • Letter from the Town of Hatfield to the Select Men of the Town of Boston.2:823.
  • Letter From Governor Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard], General Gage[ Thomas Gage], Commodore Hood, the Commissioners, &c.2:831.to[ref. missing]

Castle William the King taking possession of submitted to General Gage[ Thomas Gage] 2:770 see index

  • C uriosities[ Curiosities]of Art Great [pilcrow]2:458[diamond]
  • urites number of in England[ref. missing]
  • Kings Remarked on by Briton2:618
  • Kings Answer to the address of the House of Lords, wherein they desire him to Extend the Statute of Harry 8th to America2:477.
  • Kings Speech to the Parliament.2:588

Kings and Queens of Great Britain and England an Account of.[ref. missing] see index

  • Kings, their Epithet's, and when they began their Reigns.2:722
  • Petition of the Town of Boston to the King2:588.
  • Petition of the County of Middlesex to the King2:596.
  • Petition of the House of Representatives of the Massa. Bay to the King, Impeaching Governor Barnard.[ Sir Francis Bernard] 2:649.

Petition of the city of London to the King.2:Ibid. see index

  • Petition of the House of Representatives to the King from Georgia.2:725
  • [no preceding index entries]

Representatives of the Province of South Carolina, refuse to grant money for the Kings Troops.3:10 see index

  • Representatives of the Province of South Carolina, Their procee- dings[ proceedings]with respect of their Right of Granting Money for the Society of the Bill of Rights.. Etc.3:292. 3:305
  • Representatives of the Peo- ple[ People], whom they pay their Gover- nors,[ Governors]have a check on them3:67.
  • Representatives For the Town of Boston chosen3:115.
  • Huchinson[ Hutchinson]Thomas, Governor of the Massachusetts Bay, blamed for proroguging the General Court in obediance to Instructions3:10

Huchinson[ Hutchinson]Thomas, Governor Compared to King James3:18 see index

  • Huchinson[ Hutchinson]Thomas, Governor His Letter to the Moderator of the Merchants Meeting3:25
  • Huchinson[ Hutchinson]Thomas, Governor His proclamation, pronounces the Meeting unlaw- ful[ unlawful] 3:Ibid.
  • Huchinson[ Hutchinson]Thomas, Governor Orders the Justices of the County of Suffolk, to attend.3:25.
  • Junius Americanus, His Letter to the same, on the Trial of Captain Preston, &[ and]the Soldiers3:467
  • Importers Names adver- tised[ advertized] 3:1. 3:33. 3:120. 3:203
  • Importers Voted Infamous by the Town of Boston3:69

Junius, his Letter to the King3:37 see index

  • Junius Americanus, Modestus, his Answer3:38
  • Junius Americanus, On the city Remon- strance[ Remonstrance] 3:116
  • Junius Americanus, On the Kings Answer to the City Remon- strance[ Remonstrance]: gives a Character of the Ministry3:137
  • [no preceding index entries]

King, Junius his Letter to him3:37 see index

  • King, His Speech to the Parliament, complains of the Americans, especially respecting the non Importation agreement3:65
  • King, His Answer to the Lords address, in answer to the above3:74
  • King, Said to be a Weak Prince3:103
  • Priest French appointed for Nova Scotia. 73:309
  • President of Harvard College, Reverend Mr. Lock Elec- ted[ Elected] 3:34.Installed.3:71

Parliament of Great Bri- tain[ Britain], if the King should dis- solve[ dissolve]it, it would throw weight on the Crown Side.3:38. see index

  • Parliament of Great Bri- tain[ Britain], The English Constitution, can be ruined by nothing but a bad One.3:116.
  • Parliament of Great Bri- tain[ Britain], Must be Annual3:613
  • Parliament of Great Bri- tain[ Britain], Shortning[ Shortening]them, wont[ will not]restore Freedom, The Cities &[ will not]Boroughs must be more equally represented, so Say's Lord Chatham.3:207.
  • Boston vide Town of.
  • Ballot votes by, the most free way of voting, tried to be Introduced in New York Gov- erment[ Government] 3:17
  • Barnard. Sir Francis Governor[ Sir Francis Bernard]his character

Barnard. Sir Francis Governor[ Sir Francis Bernard]His petition to the King &c. about his Impeach- ment[ Impeachment] 3:56 see index

  • Barnard. Sir Francis Governor[ Sir Francis Bernard]His trial commen- ted[ commented]on3:115. 3:120.
  • vide. Deberts examination3:124
  • Barnard. Sir Francis Governor[ Sir Francis Bernard]His Petition's3:257
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor His Soliloquy3:Ibid.
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor Censured about his Pension3:46
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor Prorogues the General Court to Cambridge by vertue[ virtue]of Instructions3:57

Hutchinson Thomas Governor His Answer to the Town of Roxbury, tells them, that he had no Authority over the Kings Troops3:61 see index

  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor His Speech to the Assembly, tells them he designed to have met them at Boston, but he was other- wise[ otherwise]Instructed3:63
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor His Answer to the House of Representatives in answer to their Message, tells them the King has a right to order where they shall set.3:64
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor Frequently in Consultation with Commissioner Robinson after the Massacre3:64
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor Prorogues the General Court to Cambridge by vertue[ virtue]of Instructions3:57
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor His Answer to the Town of Roxbury, tells them, that he had no Authority over the Kings Troops3:61
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor His Speech to the Assembly, tells them he designed to have met them at Boston, but he was other- wise[ otherwise]Instructed3:63

Hutchinson Thomas Governor His Answer to the House of Representatives in answer to their Message, tells them the King has a right to order where they shall set.3:64 see index

  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor Frequently in Consultation with Commissioner Robinson after the Massacre3:64
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor His Answer to the Address of the Council, tells them, he is a Servant to the King &[ and]must obey him &c.3:69
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor His Answer to the House of Representatives, about their setting at Cambridge3:70
  • King, Junius his Letter to him3:37

King, His Speech to the Parliament, complains of the Americans, especially respecting the non Importation agreement3:65 see index

  • King, His Answer to the Lords address, in answer to the above3:74
  • King, Said to be a Weak Prince3:103
  • King, His Answer to the City of London, tells them when he will receive their pe- tition[ petition] 3:106
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor His Speech to the Assembly, tells them he designed to have met them at Boston, but he was other- wise[ otherwise]Instructed3:63
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor His Answer to the House of Representatives in answer to their Message, tells them the King has a right to order where they shall set.3:64
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor Frequently in Consultation with Commissioner Robinson after the Massacre3:64

Hutchinson Thomas Governor His Answer to the Address of the Council, tells them, he is a Servant to the King &[ and]must obey him &c.3:69 see index

  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor His Answer to the House of Representatives, about their setting at Cambridge3:70
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor Would like to made a Baronet3:71
  • Lords House of, Resolves moved by Lord Richmond to pass in the House, respecting America3:177.
  • Lords House of, Debates in, concer- ning[ concerning]America3:Ibid.
  • Lords House of, Debates in, rela- tive[ relative]to the Duty Acts; Lord Hillsborough[ Wills Hill]determines to fix the Right of taxing America &c.3:222.

Lords House of, Their Address to the King in answer to his Speech3:71. 3:369 see index

  • Lords House of, Debates in it, &[ and]Lord Chathams Speech, on the hostilities of the Spaniards, and the Terrible Situation Great Bri- tain[ Britain]is in by means of a bad Ministry. &c.3:383.
  • Lords House of, Debates in it on a War with Spain. &c.3:410.
  • Lords House of, Debates in it, on Addressing his Majesty on the Convention with Spain.3:442
  • Council of ye[ the]Massachusetts Bay Their proceedings on the same, which proves Ju- nius[ Junius]Americanus's assertion with Regard to Governor Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]to be True.3:594
  • Council of ye[ the]Massachusetts Bay Their depositions, re- lative[ relative]to Governors Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]s deposition3:605.
  • Council of ye[ the]Massachusetts Bay Their proceedings respecting a Peice[ Piece]signed Mucious Scaeoula3:611

Commons House of of Great Britain, their answer to the Kings Speech, about the Agreement of the American Merchants3:74 see index

  • Commons House of Speaker of Sir Flecher[ Fletcher]Norton chose. 83. 86.
  • Commons House of Their Resolves about Doctor Musgrave, and that the Establish ment of the Judges &[ and]Commissi- oners[ Commissioners]may be laid before them. &c.3:85
  • Funeral of Young Snider, (Murdered by E. Richardson,) an Account of it3:53
  • Funeral of the 4 persons Murdered in the Boston Mas- sacre[ Massacre]with a particular account of it3:61
  • Funeral of Patrick Car Murdered at the Massacre.3:65

Freeholders, English ones Num- bers[ Numbers]of, who have petitioned the king. &c.3:74(up) see index

  • [no following entries]
  • King, Junius his Letter to him3:37
  • King, His Speech to the Parliament, complains of the Americans, especially respecting the non Importation agreement3:65

King, His Answer to the Lords address, in answer to the above3:74 see index

  • King, Said to be a Weak Prince3:103
  • King, His Answer to the City of London, tells them when he will receive their pe- tition[ petition] 3:106
  • King, His Answer to the Remonstrance of the City of London, tells them they are misled, and that he rules according to the Constitution &c.3:116.(up)
  • of the Assembly of N. Car olina[ North Carolina]to the Things against be- ing[ being]taxed by the Parliament, and ag ainst the Resolves of the Lords a nd Commons3:21
  • One urging the Ameri- ca ns[ Americans]to break off all connexions[ connections]with Great Britain, unless she repeals the Tea Act3:40
  • of the Council of the Massachusetts Bay, to Governor Hut- chinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], when he first met the Court at Cambridge3:69

of the House of Lords tot he Kings Speech in answer to3:74 see index

  • Remonstrance and Petition of the city of London to the King3:106,3:178,3:556
  • of both Houses of Parliament to the King on occasi- on[ occasion]of the Remonstrance of London3:129
  • To the Free- holders[ Freeholders]of the County of Mid- dlesex[ Middlesex]by John Withers, on his enlargement; wherein he finds great fault with the public measures. &c3:133
  • Informer, Jesse Savil, tar- red[ tarred]and Feathered3:71

Jamacia[ Jamaica]Island Assembly of dissolved by Governor Trelaw- ney[ Trelawney], because they would not provide for the Kings troops3:82 see index

  • Ireland a riot there against the Court party, and their House of Commons spirited in the Cause of liberty3:85
  • Informer, Owen Richards, Tarred, and Feathered3:121
  • Informer, Prosecutes Young Jones3:341
  • King, Junius his Letter to him3:37
  • King, His Speech to the Parliament, complains of the Americans, especially respecting the non Importation agreement3:65
  • King, His Answer to the Lords address, in answer to the above3:74

King, Said to be a Weak Prince3:103 see index

  • King, His Answer to the City of London, tells them when he will receive their pe- tition[ petition] 3:106
  • King, His Answer to the Remonstrance of the City of London, tells them they are misled, and that he rules according to the Constitution &c.3:116.(up)
  • King, His Speech to the Parliament, complains of the Americans, especially respecting the non Importation agreement3:65
  • King, His Answer to the Lords address, in answer to the above3:74
  • King, Said to be a Weak Prince3:103

King, His Answer to the City of London, tells them when he will receive their pe- tition[ petition] 3:106 see index

  • King, His Answer to the Remonstrance of the City of London, tells them they are misled, and that he rules according to the Constitution &c.3:116.(up)
  • Preston Thomas. Captain His Narrative of the Massacre.3:155.
  • Preston Thomas. Captain Tried for Murder &[ Captain]cleared3:298.
  • Petition of the Town of Roxbury to Governor Hutchin- son[ Hutchinson]for a Removal of the Troops from Boston.3:61.

Petition of the City of London to the King.3:106. see index

  • Petition Another.3:178.
  • Petition Another.3:556.
  • Petition Another against an Act of Parliament for embank- ing[ embanking]River Thames3:528.
  • One urging the Ameri- ca ns[ Americans]to break off all connexions[ connections]with Great Britain, unless she repeals the Tea Act3:40
  • of the Council of the Massachusetts Bay, to Governor Hut- chinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], when he first met the Court at Cambridge3:69
  • of the House of Lords tot he Kings Speech in answer to3:74

Remonstrance and Petition of the city of London to the King3:106,3:178,3:556 see index

  • of both Houses of Parliament to the King on occasi- on[ occasion]of the Remonstrance of London3:129
  • To the Free- holders[ Freeholders]of the County of Mid- dlesex[ Middlesex]by John Withers, on his enlargement; wherein he finds great fault with the public measures. &c3:133
  • of the Council of the Massachusetts Bay to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]pray him to remove the Court of Boston3:145
  • Richards Owen, the Informer, Tarred, & Feathered.3:Ibid.
  • Richards Owen, Prosecutes Young Jones.3:341.
  • Richards Owen, Cast on the Tryal.[ Trial] 3:531.

Remonstrance. Etc. of the City of London, to the King.3:106. see index

  • Remonstrance. Etc. Another of the same.3:178.
  • Remonstrance. Etc. Another of the same, to the same.3:556.
  • Remonstrance. Etc. Of the City of Westminster, to the King.3:132. 3:353.
  • Wilkes John Esquire Chose Sheriff of the City of London, his ad- dress[ address]to them on the occasion.3:556.
  • Wilkes John Esquire His Will.3:561.
  • Watchman. a peice expo- sing[ exposing]the pernicious Principles of the Delany Family. &c. at New York.3:47. 3:67. 3:77. 3:113.

Whisperer, a very Bold Paper, against the King, Prin- cess[ Princess]Dowager, & the Ministry. &c.3:106. see index

  • Whisperer, Another.3:228.
  • Whisperer, A Smart Free Letter he sends to Lord Mansfield.3:169.
  • Whitfield. George Reverend Arrives at Rhode Island.3:192.
  • Letter Another.3:639
  • Lords, a List of Patriot Ones3:74.
  • Livingstones Family at New York, patriots and always Friends to liberty3:77.

London, City of, the Reception they met with, when they waited on the King with their petition. &c.3:109. 3:116. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • King, His Answer to the Lords address, in answer to the above3:74
  • King, Said to be a Weak Prince3:103
  • King, His Answer to the City of London, tells them when he will receive their pe- tition[ petition] 3:106

King, His Answer to the Remonstrance of the City of London, tells them they are misled, and that he rules according to the Constitution &c.3:116.(up) see index

  • [no following entries]
  • King of Spain represented as a Fool, vid a ludicrous Letter3:323
  • Kings are Servants for the Peoples Goods, and not their Masters3:370
  • Kings What their preroga- tive[ prerogative]is3:123

King wont[ will not]disolve the Parliament, if he should, he says it would be un- constitutional[ unconstitutional] 3:116. 3:184. 3:557 see index

  • [no following entries]
  • [no preceding index entries]

Letter from Junius to the King on the City Remon- strance[] 3:116 see index

  • Letter From the same, on the Kings Answer to the above, gives a Character of the Ministry3:137
  • Letter From New Ham- pshire[ Hampshire], giving an account of the situation of the peo- ple[ people], there Respecting Liberty &[ and]the connections of the Great Men &c.3:152
  • Letter From Junius Americanus to Lord Hills- borough[ Hillsborough] [ Wills Hill], on the Boston Massacre3:161
  • London City of, their Address &c, to the thing: an Account of their proceedings3:556
  • London City of, Chooses Mr Nash[ William Nash]Lord Mayor, and an Account of the dis- turbance[ disturbance]consequent on it3:635. 3:641.
  • Lords House of, Speech in, by Lord Chatham, in Favour[ Favor]of America3:110

Lords House of, Debates in it, respec- ting[ respecting]addressing the King on the City Remonstrance3:119 see index

  • Lords House of, On the Civil List3:125
  • Lords House of, Their Address to the King on the City Remon- strance[ Remonstrance] 3:129
  • Lords House of, Resolves moved by Lord Richmond to pass in the House, respecting America3:177.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Resolves of the Ho- use[ House]of Commons, in Great Bri- tain[ Britain], when they partly repeal'd[ repealed]the duty Act and took under Consideration the city Remon- stance[ Remonstrance], and the Right of petiti- oning[ petitioning]the King.3:119. see index

  • Resolves Moved for, in ye[ the]House of Commons, by Mr Bourke to be past relative to America3:184.
  • Resolves of the Phila- delphia[ Philadelphia]Tradesmen &c, to abide by the Non Importation Agree- ment.[ Agreement]&c: and against Newport3:136.
  • Resolves of the same, Against New York for Breaking the Agreement3:183.
  • Instructions to the Asem- bly[ Assembly]of New York, about voting by Balot[ Ballot] 3:17

Instructions of the Town of Boston to their Representa- tives[ Representatives], wherein they largely debate about the right of removing the Court to Cambridge, and define the Kings Prerogative3:123 see index

  • Instructions of the Town of Haverhill to their Represen- tative[ Representative], ordering him to vote to proceed to Business &c.3:259
  • Instructions From the King to the Governor of South Carolina, about the Assemblies granting monies &c.3:292
  • Instructions From the King to Governor Hutchinson[ reg=""]forbiding him to assent to any grants made to Agents, chose &c3:521
  • Kennedy Pardoned3:489
  • King of Spain represented as a Fool, vid a ludicrous Letter3:323
  • Kings are Servants for the Peoples Goods, and not their Masters3:370

Kings What their preroga- tive[ prerogative]is3:123 see index

  • King wont[ will not]disolve the Parliament, if he should, he says it would be un- constitutional[ unconstitutional] 3:116. 3:184. 3:557
  • Commons House of Their resolves previous to the partial Repeal of the Tea Act3:119
  • Commons House of Their resolves respecting the City Remonstrance &c. and the Subjects right to petition &c.3:Ibid.
  • Commons House of Debates in, about the City Remonstrance3:125

Commons House of Address the King on the same3:129 see index

  • Commons House of Wont[ Will not]Repeal the Duty on Tea3:133
  • Commons House of Debates in it concer- ning[ concerning]the Boston Massacre3:154. 3:156.
  • Commons House of Debates in, about Ame- rica[ America], and Mr. Bourkes Motion for Resolves3:184
  • Lords House of, Speech in, by Lord Chatham, in Favour[ Favor]of America3:110
  • Lords House of, Debates in it, respec- ting[ respecting]addressing the King on the City Remonstrance3:119
  • Lords House of, On the Civil List3:125

Lords House of, Their Address to the King on the City Remon- strance[ Remonstrance] 3:129 see index

  • Lords House of, Resolves moved by Lord Richmond to pass in the House, respecting America3:177.
  • Lords House of, Debates in, concer- ning[ concerning]America3:Ibid.
  • Lords House of, Debates in, rela- tive[ relative]to the Duty Acts; Lord Hillsborough[ Wills Hill]determines to fix the Right of taxing America &c.3:222.
  • of the Council of the Massachusetts Bay, to Governor Hut- chinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], when he first met the Court at Cambridge3:69
  • of the House of Lords tot he Kings Speech in answer to3:74
  • Remonstrance and Petition of the city of London to the King3:106,3:178,3:556

of both Houses of Parliament to the King on occasi- on[ occasion]of the Remonstrance of London3:129 see index

  • To the Free- holders[ Freeholders]of the County of Mid- dlesex[ Middlesex]by John Withers, on his enlargement; wherein he finds great fault with the public measures. &c3:133
  • of the Council of the Massachusetts Bay to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]pray him to remove the Court of Boston3:145
  • of the City of Lon- don[ London]to the King on the birth of a Princess3:211
  • King's Answer to the address of both Houses of Parliament on the City address3:132.

King's Threatened3:130. see index

  • King's A Prophecy, con- cerning.[ concerning]&c.3:Ibid.
  • King's His Speech to the Parliament, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]them, after the partial Repeal of the Tea Act.3:177.
  • King's His Answer to the 2nd Remonstrance of the City of London3:184.
  • [no preceding index entries]

King's Answer to the address of both Houses of Parliament on the City address3:132. see index

  • King's Threatened3:130.
  • King's A Prophecy, con- cerning.[ concerning]&c.3:Ibid.
  • King's His Speech to the Parliament, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]them, after the partial Repeal of the Tea Act.3:177.
  • Remonstrance. Etc. of the City of London, to the King.3:106.
  • Remonstrance. Etc. Another of the same.3:178.
  • Remonstrance. Etc. Another of the same, to the same.3:556.

Remonstrance. Etc. Of the City of Westminster, to the King.3:132. 3:353. see index

  • Remonstrance. Etc. Of the Repre- sentatives[ Representatives]of Province of the Massachusetts Bay, against hol- ding[ holding]the Court of Cambridge.3:134.
  • Remonstrance. Etc. Of Both Houses of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, to the Governor on his refusing the Grants to the Agents.3:508.(up)
  • Junius, his Letter to the King3:37
  • Junius Americanus, Modestus, his Answer3:38
  • Junius Americanus, On the city Remon- strance[ Remonstrance] 3:116

Junius Americanus, On the Kings Answer to the City Remon- strance[ Remonstrance]: gives a Character of the Ministry3:137 see index

  • Junius Americanus, His Letter to Lord Mansfield : speaks of him as a very corrupt Judge3:373
  • Junius Americanus, On the hostilities of the Spaniards, and the shameful Convention with them, and shews that it was a very proper Time to make war with them &c.3:445
  • Junius Americanus, His Letter to the Duke of Grafton on his being again appointed to ye[ the]Ministry: he draws a Character of the present Ministry3:566
  • Letter from Junius to the King on the City Remon- strance[] 3:116

Letter From the same, on the Kings Answer to the above, gives a Character of the Ministry3:137 see index

  • Letter From New Ham- pshire[ Hampshire], giving an account of the situation of the peo- ple[ people], there Respecting Liberty &[ and]the connections of the Great Men &c.3:152
  • Letter From Junius Americanus to Lord Hills- borough[ Hillsborough] [ Wills Hill], on the Boston Massacre3:161
  • Letter From the Mer- chants[ Merchants]of New York to the Merchants of Philadelphia after they had broke the Agreement3:174.
  • Merchants. &c. of Ha- verhill[ Haverill], their proceedings re- lative[ relative]to the Non Importation Agreement3:94
  • Merchants. &c. of Marblehead, their Transactions relative to the Non Importation Agreement.3:127.

Merchants. &c. Their Resolves against Rhode Island, for brea- king[ breaking]the Agreement3:145. see index

  • Merchants. &c. Merchants, &c. of Newport, violate their Agree- ment[ Agreement] 3:130
  • Merchants. &c. Renew it a- gain[ again] 3:138.
  • Merchants. &c. Their proceedings relative to the Non Importation Agremeent. &c.3:209.
  • King's Answer to the address of both Houses of Parliament on the City address3:132.
  • King's Threatened3:130.
  • King's A Prophecy, con- cerning.[ concerning]&c.3:Ibid.

King's His Speech to the Parliament, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]them, after the partial Repeal of the Tea Act.3:177. see index

  • King's His Answer to the 2nd Remonstrance of the City of London3:184.
  • King's His Answer to the Address of the City of London, on the Birth of a Princess.3:211.
  • King's Said to be a But- ton[ Button]Maker.3:213.
  • King's Threatened3:130.
  • King's A Prophecy, con- cerning.[ concerning]&c.3:Ibid.
  • King's His Speech to the Parliament, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]them, after the partial Repeal of the Tea Act.3:177.

King's His Answer to the 2nd Remonstrance of the City of London3:184. see index

  • King's His Answer to the Address of the City of London, on the Birth of a Princess.3:211.
  • King's Said to be a But- ton[ Button]Maker.3:213.
  • King's His Speech to the Parliament, mentions the Spa- niards[ Spaniards]taking Falkland Island, and finds fault with Boston respecting the Non Importation agreement.3:369.
  • Lords House of a Protest entered against addres- sing[ addressing]the King on the Conven- tion[ Convention] 3:442

Lord Mayor, Beckford[ William Beckford], his Answer to the King, when he answered the 2d[ second]Remon- strance[ Remonstrance]of the City3:184 see index

  • Lord Mayor, Beckford[ William Beckford], He dies3:209. 3:234. 3:238
  • Lord Mayor, Beckford[ William Beckford], His Cha- racter[ Character] 3:234
  • Lord Mayor, Beckford[ William Beckford], Suspected to have been Poisoned3:353
  • Judges, vid the Proclamation.
  • Judges, Lord Mansfield, &[ and]Baron Smyth, a motion made in the House of Commons, to enquire into their Conduct.3:396
  • Judges, &[ and]Justices, the First made, since Hutchin- son[ Thomas Hutchinson], came to the Chair3:427

Information by the Kings Attorney against Criminals, that made un- constitutional[ unconstitutional] 3:205 3:395. 3:402.a Modern practice3:395. 3:402 see index

  • [no following entries]
  • King's A Prophecy, con- cerning.[ concerning]&c.3:Ibid.
  • King's His Speech to the Parliament, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]them, after the partial Repeal of the Tea Act.3:177.
  • King's His Answer to the 2nd Remonstrance of the City of London3:184.

King's His Answer to the Address of the City of London, on the Birth of a Princess.3:211. see index

  • King's Said to be a But- ton[ Button]Maker.3:213.
  • King's His Speech to the Parliament, mentions the Spa- niards[ Spaniards]taking Falkland Island, and finds fault with Boston respecting the Non Importation agreement.3:369.
  • King's His Speech ( respec- ting[ respecting]the Spaniards taking Falk- land[ Falkland]Island,) said to contain an absolute Falshood.[ Falsehood]&c.3:383.
  • [no preceding index entries]

London city, debates in respecting the Lord Mayors Answer to the King, and about addressing him on the Birth of a Princess. &c. with an Account of the procession. &c.3:211 see index

  • London city, debates in the Court of Alderman &[ and]Common Council, relative to the Recorders note atten- ding[ attending], when summoned to at- tend[ attend]with Remonstrance. &c.3:343
  • London city, They vote the Recorder is not to be Consulted with, as not fit for the Business of the City &c.3:344
  • London city, They wait on the King with another Re- monstrance[ Remonstrance] 3:384
  • of both Houses of Parliament to the King on occasi- on[ occasion]of the Remonstrance of London3:129
  • To the Free- holders[ Freeholders]of the County of Mid- dlesex[ Middlesex]by John Withers, on his enlargement; wherein he finds great fault with the public measures. &c3:133
  • of the Council of the Massachusetts Bay to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]pray him to remove the Court of Boston3:145

of the City of Lon- don[ London]to the King on the birth of a Princess3:211 see index

  • Remonstrance and Petition of the City of Westmin- ster[ Westminster]to the King3:353
  • King's His Speech to the Parliament, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]them, after the partial Repeal of the Tea Act.3:177.
  • King's His Answer to the 2nd Remonstrance of the City of London3:184.
  • King's His Answer to the Address of the City of London, on the Birth of a Princess.3:211.

King's Said to be a But- ton[ Button]Maker.3:213. see index

  • King's His Speech to the Parliament, mentions the Spa- niards[ Spaniards]taking Falkland Island, and finds fault with Boston respecting the Non Importation agreement.3:369.
  • King's His Speech ( respec- ting[ respecting]the Spaniards taking Falk- land[ Falkland]Island,) said to contain an absolute Falshood.[ Falsehood]&c.3:383.
  • King's Freely dealt with by Junius, about the Convention with Spain, taxed as not behaving as a Man of honor. &c.3:453.
  • Trial Between Ebenezer Cutler, & Robert Peirpoint, & Caleb Davis.3:459. 3:564.
  • Trial of the Soldiers, & Preston, a very partial one.3:467.
  • Trial a Famous one, of Jonathan Peter Lenger, for a Libel.3:205.

Trial of the Printer of Junius's Letter to the King;-- & the Verdict.3:233. 3:245. see index

  • Trial said on the Trial to be no libel.3:245.
  • Trial of the Duke of Cumberland, for Criminal Conversation. &c.3:234. 3:247.
  • Trial of the Soldiers Concerned in the Boston Massacre.3:785.
  • Verdict in Favour[ Favor]of Peir- point[ Peirpoint]&c against Ebenzer Cutter.3:564.
  • Verdict in Favour[ Favor]of Doctor Haly, for Duelling.3:619.

Verdict in Favour[ Favor]of the Printer of Junius's Letter to the King.3:233. 3:245. see index

  • Virginia Representa- tives[ Representatives]of, against Bishops in America.3:535.
  • Virginia House of Repre- sentatives[ Representatives], their Petition to the King respecting the Re- venue[ Revenue]Acts. &c.3:452.
  • Vindex[ Samuel Adams]his Comments, on the Tryal[ Trial]of the Soldiers. &c.3:325. 3:327,3:339. 3:346. 3:357. 3:361. 3:370. 3:375.
  • Fire occasioned by drawing Rum, persons ought to be very careful, bad consequences some- times[ sometimes]ensues. &c3:192.
  • Fire a Woman Burnt to Death by an Internal one3:368
  • Fire Another, Burnt to Death the same Way3:389

Fire Fire a great one at Portsmouth. The Kings Dock Burnt3:246. 3:254. 3:258. 3:263. see index

  • Fire Actors in it discove- red[ discovered] 3:582
  • Falkland Islands Spa- niards[ Spaniards]take them, a discrip- tion[ description]of them.3:233 3:311
  • Falkland Islands The Rights of Great Britain to them3:445
  • Paoli bribed by the Duke of Grafton.3:208.
  • Pownal Governor his Speech in Favor of America says the Castle ought not to have been delivered to the Regular Troops: if he had received an order he would not have obey'd[ obeyed]it because the Governor by the Charter out to have the Supreme Command3:249.

Portsmouth in Eng- land[ England], a Great Fire there, Burns the Kings Dock &c.3:246. see index

  • Pemberton Ebenezer Reverend, Created Doctor of Divi- vinity[ Divinity] 3:281.
  • Paxton Charles, the Way he got his Money. &c.3:327.
  • Philanthrop[ Jonathan Sewall], his Comments on the Trial of Captain Preston &[ and]the Soldiers.3:336. 3:365. 3:380. 3:387. 3:401.
  • Oliver Andrew Lieutenant Governor, his deposition respecting the Massacre. &c.3:250.
  • Oliver Andrew Lieutenant Censured for it: said to be a False Acco- unt.[ Account] 3:256. 3:266.

Oliver Andrew Lieutenant Of the King gave Credit to it, it was no doubt the Reason why the Castle was taken from us &[ and]More Ships sent.3:255. see index

  • Oliver Andrew Lieutenant Appointed Lieu- tenant[ Lieutenant]Governor.3:345.
  • Oliver Andrew Lieutenant His Salary.3:351.
  • Oliver Andrew Lieutenant His Commissi- on[ Commission]arrives.3:418.
  • Debert Dennis his Examination relative to Impeachment against Governor Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard] 3:124

Debert Dennis his petition to King &c on same3:257 see index

  • Debates in the City of London vide under London City of
  • Deists what they maintain3:215
  • Dowager vid Princess Dow- ager[ Dowager]

Juries, Grand of Phi- ladelphia[ Philadelphia], their Resolves on the Merchants of that city's brea- king[ breaking]the Non Importation a- greement[ agreement]&c3:271 see index

  • Jackson, Agent, a Friend to the despotic Ministry3:280
  • Inhabitants Number of, vid under Numbers
  • Independency of Ameri- can[ American]Governors First began at New York3:385
  • Rum Danger of draw- ing it by Candle Light.3:192.

Ruggles Timothy, appoin- ted[ appointed]Surveyor of the Kings Woods.3:273. see index

  • Roman Catholics, admitted into offices in the West Indies by order from the Minister of State, a great Grievance.3:298. 3:362.
  • Roman Catholics, A Letter from one from Halifax, Informing of a popish Priests being of Halifax. Etc.3:309
  • Roman Catholics, Another Letter from the same, on the same.3:424.
  • Instructions to the Asem- bly[ Assembly]of New York, about voting by Balot[ Ballot] 3:17
  • Instructions of the Town of Boston to their Representa- tives[ Representatives], wherein they largely debate about the right of removing the Court to Cambridge, and define the Kings Prerogative3:123
  • Instructions of the Town of Haverhill to their Represen- tative[ Representative], ordering him to vote to proceed to Business &c.3:259

Instructions From the King to the Governor of South Carolina, about the Assemblies granting monies &c.3:292 see index

  • Instructions From the King to Governor Hutchinson[ reg=""]forbiding him to assent to any grants made to Agents, chose &c3:521
  • Junius Americanus his letter to Governor Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard] 3:19
  • Junius Americanus His Letter to Lord Hillsborough[ Wills Hill] 3:107
  • King, He some time's[ sometimes]grants pardons before convictions, or sentence3:619.
  • Kennedy's the Murderers respi- ted[ respited] 3:149
  • Kennedy Pardoned3:489

King of Spain represented as a Fool, vid a ludicrous Letter3:323 see index

  • Kings are Servants for the Peoples Goods, and not their Masters3:370
  • Kings What their preroga- tive[ prerogative]is3:123
  • King wont[ will not]disolve the Parliament, if he should, he says it would be un- constitutional[ unconstitutional] 3:116. 3:184. 3:557
  • Sentence against those who Tarred, & Feathered Jesse Savil the Informer.3:307.

Spain King of, Represen- ted[ Represented]as a Fool.3:323. see index

  • Secretary. Appointed for the Mas- sachusetts[ Massachusetts]Bay.3:345.
  • Spain & France Numbers of.3:384.
  • Shirley Governor, his Death; an account of his Funeral, Etc.3:430. 3:431.
  • New York Assembly, or House of Representa- tives[ Representatives], An Account of the Sums they have advanced for the Troops3:45.

New York Assembly, or House of Representa- tives[ Representatives], Governor Lord Dunmore, his first Speech to them, commends them for brea- king[ breaking]the Non Importation A- greement.[ Agreement]&c.3:336. see index

  • New York Assembly, or House of Representa- tives[ Representatives], Their proceedings relative to Captain Mcdougal.3:350.
  • New York Assembly, or House of Representa- tives[ Representatives], Their Address to Lord Dunmore, in Answer to his first Speech.3:351.
  • New York Assembly, or House of Representa- tives[ Representatives], Their proceedings &[ and]Resolves relative to the Exlusion of Judge Leving- stone[ Levingstone]from a Seat3:404.
  • Petitions of Agent De- bert[ Debert], relative to Governor Bernards Impeachment3:257.

Petitions of Agent De- bert[ Debert], Remonstrance, &[ and]Address of the City of West- minster[ Westminster]to the King3:353. see index

  • Petitions of the House of Representatives to the King against the Revenue Acts, &c. From Virginia3:452.
  • Petitions of the Regula- tors[ Regulators]to Governor Tyron, before the Battle.3:518.
  • Petitions of Mr Allen to the House of Commons, that the Murderers of his Son might be Brought to Justice, which petition was Rejected3:528.
  • To the Free- holders[ Freeholders]of the County of Mid- dlesex[ Middlesex]by John Withers, on his enlargement; wherein he finds great fault with the public measures. &c3:133
  • of the Council of the Massachusetts Bay to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]pray him to remove the Court of Boston3:145
  • of the City of Lon- don[ London]to the King on the birth of a Princess3:211

Remonstrance and Petition of the City of Westmin- ster[ Westminster]to the King3:353 see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Address to the Freemen of the Colony of New York by Captain Mcdougal, containing the whole affair of the prosecution carri- ed[ carried]against him respecting a Libel3:359
  • Address to the Protestants in Great Britain &[ and]the Colonies, showing them the prenicious plan, schemed by Lord Bute, to ruin out liberties, and Introduce the Roman Catholic, Religion3:361

Address of the House of Lords in answer to the Kings Speech3:369 see index

  • Address of the House of Commons on the same3:Ibid
  • Address of the Episcopal Clergy of Boston, to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], on his being advanced to the Government3:426
  • Address of the Merchants of Boston to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]on the same3:Ibid
  • Commons House of Debates in it concer- ning[ concerning]the Boston Massacre3:154. 3:156.
  • Commons House of Debates in, about Ame- rica[ America], and Mr. Bourkes Motion for Resolves3:184
  • Commons House of Governor Pownal[ Thomas Pownall]s Speech in, in Favor of America, says he would not have delivered up Castle William if ordered3:249.

Commons House of Their address in ans- wer[ answer]to the Kings Speech3:369. see index

  • Commons House of Debates in about In- formations[ Informations]by the Attorney General &c.3:395-3:402.
  • Commons House of Debates in, about en- quiring[ enquiring]into the Conduct of Lord Mansfield &[ and]Baron Smyth3:396
  • Commons House of about the violated rights of the Middlesex Electors3:398
  • King's His Answer to the 2nd Remonstrance of the City of London3:184.
  • King's His Answer to the Address of the City of London, on the Birth of a Princess.3:211.
  • King's Said to be a But- ton[ Button]Maker.3:213.

King's His Speech to the Parliament, mentions the Spa- niards[ Spaniards]taking Falkland Island, and finds fault with Boston respecting the Non Importation agreement.3:369. see index

  • King's His Speech ( respec- ting[ respecting]the Spaniards taking Falk- land[ Falkland]Island,) said to contain an absolute Falshood.[ Falsehood]&c.3:383.
  • King's Freely dealt with by Junius, about the Convention with Spain, taxed as not behaving as a Man of honor. &c.3:453.
  • King's Freely dealt with by the Freeholder, about the late riots in the City on account of the Lord Mayor, & Alder- man[ Alderman], being sent to the Tower.3:483.
  • Kennedy's the Murderers respi- ted[ respited] 3:149
  • Kennedy Pardoned3:489
  • King of Spain represented as a Fool, vid a ludicrous Letter3:323

Kings are Servants for the Peoples Goods, and not their Masters3:370 see index

  • Kings What their preroga- tive[ prerogative]is3:123
  • King wont[ will not]disolve the Parliament, if he should, he says it would be un- constitutional[ unconstitutional] 3:116. 3:184. 3:557
  • King's His Answer to the Address of the City of London, on the Birth of a Princess.3:211.
  • King's Said to be a But- ton[ Button]Maker.3:213.
  • King's His Speech to the Parliament, mentions the Spa- niards[ Spaniards]taking Falkland Island, and finds fault with Boston respecting the Non Importation agreement.3:369.

King's His Speech ( respec- ting[ respecting]the Spaniards taking Falk- land[ Falkland]Island,) said to contain an absolute Falshood.[ Falsehood]&c.3:383. see index

  • King's Freely dealt with by Junius, about the Convention with Spain, taxed as not behaving as a Man of honor. &c.3:453.
  • King's Freely dealt with by the Freeholder, about the late riots in the City on account of the Lord Mayor, & Alder- man[ Alderman], being sent to the Tower.3:483.
  • King's His Speech when he prorogued the Parliament.3:519.
  • London city, debates in respecting the Lord Mayors Answer to the King, and about addressing him on the Birth of a Princess. &c. with an Account of the procession. &c.3:211
  • London city, debates in the Court of Alderman &[ and]Common Council, relative to the Recorders note atten- ding[ attending], when summoned to at- tend[ attend]with Remonstrance. &c.3:343
  • London city, They vote the Recorder is not to be Consulted with, as not fit for the Business of the City &c.3:344

London city, They wait on the King with another Re- monstrance[ Remonstrance] 3:384 see index

  • London city, Debates in about Impressing Men &c.3:415.
  • London city, Their proceeding respecting the Lord Mayor, &[ and]Alderman's discharging the Printers &c; vote them their Thanks.3:472
  • London city, A Great Riot in it occasioned by the Commitment of the Lord Mayor &c. to the Tower3:472
  • Deposition of the Council of the Massachusetts Bay &[ and]relative to Andrew Oliver s Deposition3:605
  • Deposition About the Boston Massacre3:707
  • Dunmore Lord Governor his first Speech to the Assembly of New York, he commends the Yorkers for Breaking the Non- Importa- tion[ Importation]Agreement &c.3:336

Dunmore Lord Governor Speech to the Assem- bly[ Assembly]of New York, refuses to take his Salary, tells them the King has appointed him one3:385 see index

  • Dunmore Lord Governor Appointed Governor of Virginia3:Ibid
  • Davis Reverend Baptist Minister, re- presented[ represented]as an enemy to this peo- ple[ people] 3:353A Letter setting the Town of Boston &[ and]Province in a very ill Light, supposed to be wrote by him3:366
  • [no preceding index entries]

Charters of the Colonies, especially of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, explained &c, Shewing[ Showing]our subjection to the King of Great Britain, arises only from the Compact, contained in the Charter3:413. 3:444. 3:453 see index

  • Charters of the Colonies, Queries on the same3:Ibid
  • Charters of the Colonies, Designs against out Charter laid aside3:435. 3:442
  • Confirmation by Bishops an Account of it, nothing but an holy Farce3:414
  • Queries Concerning our Charter, addressed to Johan- nes[ Johannes]in Eremo.3:391.

Queries of Johannes in Eremo on our Charter; and the Nature of our Subjection to King Great Britain3:413. see index

  • Quincy Samuel, his pleadings for the King, on the Trial of the Soldiers concerned in the Boston Mas- sacre.[ Massacre] 3:793. 3:838.
  • Quincy Josiah, his Pleadings for the Soldiers on the same Trial.3:852. 3:919.
  • Distance From London &c to Madrid, with the Inter- mediate[ Intermediate]places3:366
  • Debt National. vid Na- tional[ National]Debt.

Declaration of the King of Spain, wherein he agrees to Give up Falkland Islands, &c. which the King accepts3:438 see index

  • Declaration of the King of Spain, Declared in the House of Commons, Infamous3:Ibid.
  • Declaration of the King of Spain, Ratified3:450
  • Duke of Bedford, his Death &c3:447
  • Fire Actors in it discove- red[ discovered] 3:582
  • Falkland Islands Spa- niards[ Spaniards]take them, a discrip- tion[ description]of them.3:233 3:311
  • Falkland Islands The Rights of Great Britain to them3:445

Falkland Islands The King of Spain Agrees to give them up again to Great Britain3:438 see index

  • Falkland Islands A particular ac- count[ account]of the Letters which passed between the Governor &[ and]Commander, and the Articles of Capitulation, when they were giving to Spain3:533
  • Flucker Thomas, appointed Secretary of the Massachusetts Bay Bay.3:345
  • Flucker Thomas, His Commission ar- rives[ arrives] 3:418 3:460.
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachu- setts[ Massachusetts]Bay, His Answer to the Addressof Mr Moorheads Church3:435
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachu- setts[ Massachusetts]Bay, His Answer to the Address of Corporation of Harvard College3:435
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachu- setts[ Massachusetts]Bay, Satirized for his Conformity to the Church3:437

Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachu- setts[ Massachusetts]Bay, His Speech to the General Court, desires they would encourage the the raising of Men for the King, &c.3:441 see index

  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachu- setts[ Massachusetts]Bay, Invited to an entertainment at Harvard College, an account of the Parade, anthem &c. on the occasion3:441
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachu- setts[ Massachusetts]Bay, Issues a procla- mation[ proclamation], to recruit the Kings Troops3:Ibid
  • Proclamation Against those who broke Mr. Huttons Win- dows[ Windows.] 3:153.
  • Proclamation Against the Authors of a Paper, Posted up against the Judges of the Superior Court.3:374.
  • Proclamation of Governor Hut- chinson[ Hutchinson], to discountenance vice. &c.3:433.

Proclamation of the same to raise Recruits for the King.3:441. see index

  • Proclamation of the King, for taking up the Printers, which was the Foundation of the Imprisonment of the Lord Mayor, &[ and]Alderman.3:469.
  • Proclamation of Governor Hut chinson's[ Hutchinson]for a Thanksgiving, gives great offence; commented on3:598. 3:602. 3:652. &c. by Candidus.
  • Proclamation Most all the Ministers in Plimouth[ Plymouth]Coun- ty[ County], decline reading it in the usual way.3:603.
  • Address of the Corporation of Harvard College to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], on his ad- vancement[ advancement]to the Goverment3:435

Address of the House of Lords to the King on the Convention with Spain3:442 see index

  • Address of the Council of the Massachusetts Bay to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], on his advance- ment[ advancement]to the Government3:443
  • Address to the Electors of the Massachusetts Bay urging them to choose veterans in the Cause of Liberty, and to beware of Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]&c3:457
  • Address Another to the same Electors, comments on Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]s Speech &c3:401
  • [no preceding index entries]

Lords House of a Protest entered against addres- sing[ addressing]the King on the Conven- tion[ Convention] 3:442 see index

  • Lord Mayor, Beckford[ William Beckford], his Answer to the King, when he answered the 2d[ second]Remon- strance[ Remonstrance]of the City3:184
  • Lord Mayor, Beckford[ William Beckford], He dies3:209. 3:234. 3:238
  • Lord Mayor, Beckford[ William Beckford], His Cha- racter[ Character] 3:234
  • Johannes in Eremo, an Excellent peice, on Hutchin- son's[ Thomas Hutchinson]being governed by Instruc- tions[ Instructions], keeping the Court at Cambridge. &c.3:377
  • Johannes in Eremo, Queries addressed to him, about our subjection &c.3:391
  • Johannes in Eremo, His queries on the same subject3:413

Johannes in Eremo, His Answer to the Queries, wherein he shows on what Foundation our subjec- tion[ subjection]to the King of England rests on, namely our Charter. &c.3:444. 3:453. see index

  • Judge Trow- bridge[ Trowbridge], severely reflected on, by Junius Americanus, respecting his conduct &c. on Preston, &[ and]the Soldiers Trials3:467. 3:468.
  • Liberty difinition[ definition]of3:413
  • Lynde[ Benjamin Lynde], Benjamin made chief Justice3:427

Lords Protest, against addressing the King on the Convention with Spain. &c.3:449 see index

  • Land at New York gran- ted[ granted]away from the honest Owners, by Governor Tryon[ William Tryon], by ver- tue[ virtue]of a Ministered Man- date[ Mandate]&c.3:635.
  • Lectures Annual politi- cal[ political], Town of Boston vote to have, and an orator to de- claim[ declaim] 3:442
  • Lawyers, pleading's for the King against the Sol- diers[ Soldiers], concerned in the Bos- ton[ Boston]Massacre.3:793. 3:838.
  • Protest from the same, against the things Instructions and against holding the Court at Cambridge3:499.
  • Protest of Suffolk County in New York, against, against the Merchants of New York breaking their Agreement.3:222.
  • Protest One by the Inhabi- tants[ Inhabitants]of New York, against the Same.3:225.

Protest of the Lords, a- gainst[ against]addressing the King on the Convention with Spain.3:449. see index

  • Philadelphia Tradesman &c, resolve to Support the Non Importation Agreement, and have no commerce with New York.3:136.
  • Philadelphia Tradesman &c, Inhabitants meet, and Resolve to have no commerce with New York, for Breaking the Agreement3:183.
  • Debt National. vid Na- tional[ National]Debt.
  • Declaration of the King of Spain, wherein he agrees to Give up Falkland Islands, &c. which the King accepts3:438
  • Declaration of the King of Spain, Declared in the House of Commons, Infamous3:Ibid.

Declaration of the King of Spain, Ratified3:450 see index

  • Duke of Bedford, his Death &c3:447
  • Doctors degree, confer'd[ conferred]by Harvard College on Reverend Mr. Appleton3:517
  • Duel Fought at South Carolina, &[ and]the Proclaima- tion[ Proclamation]Issued in consequence3:560
  • Petitions of Agent De- bert[ Debert], relative to Governor Bernards Impeachment3:257.
  • Petitions of Agent De- bert[ Debert], Remonstrance, &[ and]Address of the City of West- minster[ Westminster]to the King3:353.

Petitions of the House of Representatives to the King against the Revenue Acts, &c. From Virginia3:452. see index

  • Petitions of the Regula- tors[ Regulators]to Governor Tyron, before the Battle.3:518.
  • Petitions of Mr Allen to the House of Commons, that the Murderers of his Son might be Brought to Justice, which petition was Rejected3:528.
  • Petitions of ye[ the]Slaves 6403:541.
  • Rhode Island, a Plan for Altering the Constitution of it.3:595.
  • Rebellion, what it is.3:599.
  • Representatives of New Jersey refuse to grant money for the Kings Troops.3:486.

Representatives of Virginia to the King, a Petition, against laying taxes. Etc.3:452. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Verdict in Favour[ Favor]of Doctor Haly, for Duelling.3:619.
  • Verdict in Favour[ Favor]of the Printer of Junius's Letter to the King.3:233. 3:245.
  • Virginia Representa- tives[ Representatives]of, against Bishops in America.3:535.

Virginia House of Repre- sentatives[ Representatives], their Petition to the King respecting the Re- venue[ Revenue]Acts. &c.3:452. see index

  • King's Said to be a But- ton[ Button]Maker.3:213.
  • King's His Speech to the Parliament, mentions the Spa- niards[ Spaniards]taking Falkland Island, and finds fault with Boston respecting the Non Importation agreement.3:369.
  • King's His Speech ( respec- ting[ respecting]the Spaniards taking Falk- land[ Falkland]Island,) said to contain an absolute Falshood.[ Falsehood]&c.3:383.

King's Freely dealt with by Junius, about the Convention with Spain, taxed as not behaving as a Man of honor. &c.3:453. see index

  • King's Freely dealt with by the Freeholder, about the late riots in the City on account of the Lord Mayor, & Alder- man[ Alderman], being sent to the Tower.3:483.
  • King's His Speech when he prorogued the Parliament.3:519.
  • King's His Answer to the Address of the City of London on ye[ the]Birth of a Prince.3:548.
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachusetts Bay His Answer to the Address of Council3:443
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Negatives several Civil officers3:454
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachusetts Bay His Family Con- nexions[ Connexions], with the offices they hold &c.3:Ibid.

Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachusetts Bay His Jesuitical Answer, to a Message from the House of Representatives, de- siring[ desiring]he would Inform them about his pay from the Crown, in which Answer, he sneers at the word Commons, as applied to our Representatives, and tells them that they King, Lords &[ and]Commons, are our supreme Legislator; and dissolves the Court3:458 see index

  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachusetts Bay He Acknowledges a Right in the British Par- liament[ Parliament]to makes us slaves3:461
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachusetts Bay A Great En- comium[ Encomium]on him3:473
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Exerted himself to Execute the Stamp Act3:479
  • Proclamation Against the Authors of a Paper, Posted up against the Judges of the Superior Court.3:374.
  • Proclamation of Governor Hut- chinson[ Hutchinson], to discountenance vice. &c.3:433.
  • Proclamation of the same to raise Recruits for the King.3:441.

Proclamation of the King, for taking up the Printers, which was the Foundation of the Imprisonment of the Lord Mayor, &[ and]Alderman.3:469. see index

  • Proclamation of Governor Hut chinson's[ Hutchinson]for a Thanksgiving, gives great offence; commented on3:598. 3:602. 3:652. &c. by Candidus.
  • Proclamation Most all the Ministers in Plimouth[ Plymouth]Coun- ty[ County], decline reading it in the usual way.3:603.
  • Proclamation Read in no Con- gregational[ Congregational]Church at Boston, except by Dr. Pemberton.3:Ibid.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Printers, Brought before the Lord Mayor, &[ and]Alderman by Vertue[ Virtue]of the Kings Procla- mation[ Proclamation], &[ and]discharged.3:471. see index

  • Pardons, the King some times gives them, before Con- viction[ Conviction], or Sentence.3:619.
  • King's His Speech to the Parliament, mentions the Spa- niards[ Spaniards]taking Falkland Island, and finds fault with Boston respecting the Non Importation agreement.3:369.
  • King's His Speech ( respec- ting[ respecting]the Spaniards taking Falk- land[ Falkland]Island,) said to contain an absolute Falshood.[ Falsehood]&c.3:383.
  • King's Freely dealt with by Junius, about the Convention with Spain, taxed as not behaving as a Man of honor. &c.3:453.

King's Freely dealt with by the Freeholder, about the late riots in the City on account of the Lord Mayor, & Alder- man[ Alderman], being sent to the Tower.3:483. see index

  • King's His Speech when he prorogued the Parliament.3:519.
  • King's His Answer to the Address of the City of London on ye[ the]Birth of a Prince.3:548.
  • Letter from John Wilkes to the Secretary of State, acquaints him that he has dicharged the Prin- ter[ Printer]take up by vertue[ virtue]of a Proc- lamation.[ Proclamation]&c.3:471
  • Letter From the the same, to the Speaker of the House of Commons on the same. &c.3:472.

Letter To the King, a severe one on the Riot about the Lord Mayor. &c. being sent to ye[ the]Tower3:483. 3:Ibid. see index

  • Letter From James Hunter, one of the Leaders of the Regulators, giving an ac- count[ account]of their oppressions &c.3:500.
  • Letter From Governor Tryon[ William Tryon], giving a particular Ac- count[ Account]of the defeat of the Regulators3:504
  • Letter To James Otis, on the Recovery of his health containing a great encomium on him3:504
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachusetts Bay A Great En- comium[ Encomium]on him3:473
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Exerted himself to Execute the Stamp Act3:479
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachusetts Bay As Bad as Governor Barnard3:Ibid

Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachusetts Bay His Speech to the General Court, tells them of Trespasser on the Kings Woods, and mentions the state of the Militia3:485 see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Impressing men Legal3:399
  • Judge Livingston, ex- cluded[ excluded]a Seat in the New York Assembly3:404
  • Independency of the American British Colonies asserted.3:413

Jersey New Assembly of de- cline[ decline]to grant any money for the Kings Troops3:486 see index

  • Judge Trowbridge, his charge to the Jury, on the Trial of the Soldiers3:903.
  • Judge Trowbridge, Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]on the same3:983.
  • Riots, Who by Law may Suppress them.3:966.3:976.
  • Rhode Island, a Plan for Altering the Constitution of it.3:595.
  • Rebellion, what it is.3:599.

Representatives of New Jersey refuse to grant money for the Kings Troops.3:486. see index

  • Representatives of Virginia to the King, a Petition, against laying taxes. Etc.3:452.
  • King's His Speech ( respec- ting[ respecting]the Spaniards taking Falk- land[ Falkland]Island,) said to contain an absolute Falshood.[ Falsehood]&c.3:383.
  • King's Freely dealt with by Junius, about the Convention with Spain, taxed as not behaving as a Man of honor. &c.3:453.
  • King's Freely dealt with by the Freeholder, about the late riots in the City on account of the Lord Mayor, & Alder- man[ Alderman], being sent to the Tower.3:483.

King's His Speech when he prorogued the Parliament.3:519. see index

  • King's His Answer to the Address of the City of London on ye[ the]Birth of a Prince.3:548.
  • Instructions of the Town of Boston to their Representa- tives[ Representatives], wherein they largely debate about the right of removing the Court to Cambridge, and define the Kings Prerogative3:123
  • Instructions of the Town of Haverhill to their Represen- tative[ Representative], ordering him to vote to proceed to Business &c.3:259
  • Instructions From the King to the Governor of South Carolina, about the Assemblies granting monies &c.3:292

Instructions From the King to Governor Hutchinson[ reg=""]forbiding him to assent to any grants made to Agents, chose &c3:521 see index

  • Junius Americanus his letter to Governor Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard] 3:19
  • Junius Americanus His Letter to Lord Hillsborough[ Wills Hill] 3:107
  • Junius Americanus On the Boston Massacre3:160,3:197
  • [no preceding index entries]

Chatham Lord his Speech in the House of Lords, about the House of Commons Respecting Jonathan Wilkes &c. and mentions the Num- ber[ Number]who have petitioned the King for Redress of Grievances. &c.3:526. see index

  • Chatham Lord His Bold Speech in the House of Lords, on the dis- solution[ dissolution]of Parliament, in which Speech he draws the Character of the House of Commons, and En- -umerates[ Enumerates]the Grievances of Great Britain &[ and]America.3:534.
  • City of London, vid London City of,
  • Camden Lord, has a Pension3:132
  • Petitions of Mr Allen to the House of Commons, that the Murderers of his Son might be Brought to Justice, which petition was Rejected3:528.
  • Petitions of ye[ the]Slaves 6403:541.
  • Petitions Account of the Numbers who have signed them in England3:74. 3:109.

Petitioners to the King in England, for Re- dress[ Redress]of Grievances, an Acc- ount[ Account]of the Number of the Counties and the Weight of them.3:526. see index

  • Petitioners vid Also Remonstrances, under the proper Head
  • Patriot Lords who they are.3:74.
  • Patriots definition of.3:365. 3:370.
  • Speech. Of Colonel Isaac Barre, in the same place, on a Motion made to send the Alderman Oliver to the Tower, in which Speech he draws a Shocking Character of the House of Commons, char- ging[ charging]them with doing worse acts, than Charles 1, Etc.3:469.
  • Speech. Of Lord Chat- hams[ Chathams]in the House of Lords, on a Motion made to have the Papers laid before them, respec- ting[ respecting]the Taking Falkland Is- land[ Island], in which Speech he shows the Terrible condition the kingdom is brought into by the Wretched Minister, & says they ought to be dragged to punishments, Etc. Etc.3:383.
  • Speech. & Says Impres- sing[ Impressing]Men is Legal3:399

Speech. Of Lord Chat- hams[ Chathams]in the same place, respecting Wilkes's[ John Wilkes]Right to set in the House of Com- mons.[ Commons]Etc. and gives the Num- ber[ Number]& Weight of the Petiti- on[ Petition]to the King for Redress of grievances, Etc.3:526 see index

  • [no following entries]
  • London city, Debates in about Impressing Men &c.3:415.
  • London city, Their proceeding respecting the Lord Mayor, &[ and]Alderman's discharging the Printers &c; vote them their Thanks.3:472
  • London city, A Great Riot in it occasioned by the Commitment of the Lord Mayor &c. to the Tower3:472

London city, Their petition to the King relative to the Act of Par- liament[ Parliament]for embarking the River Thames &c.3:528. see index

  • London city, Address of the Lord Mayor &c, to the King on the Birth of a Prince3:548
  • London city, Choose Wilkes[ John Wilkes], &[ and]Bull, Sheriffs.3:556.
  • him to resign rather than put in exectution[ execution], the unjust mea- sures[ measures]of the Ministry. &c.3:544

Address of the Lord Mayor &c of the city of London, to the King, on the Birth of a Prince3:548 see index

  • Address of the Merchants of Boston to Commodore Gambier[ James Gambier], on his departure3:549
  • Address of Wilkes[ John Wilkes]&[ and]Bull[ Frederick Bull], when they were chos'd[ chosen]Sheriffs of London3:556
  • Address to the Patriots in Great Britain &[ and]Ireland urging them to stand firm in the cause of liberty, and in order to preserve it, to set up Annual Lectures. &c.3:613
  • King's Freely dealt with by Junius, about the Convention with Spain, taxed as not behaving as a Man of honor. &c.3:453.
  • King's Freely dealt with by the Freeholder, about the late riots in the City on account of the Lord Mayor, & Alder- man[ Alderman], being sent to the Tower.3:483.
  • King's His Speech when he prorogued the Parliament.3:519.

King's His Answer to the Address of the City of London on ye[ the]Birth of a Prince.3:548. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • London city, Their proceeding respecting the Lord Mayor, &[ and]Alderman's discharging the Printers &c; vote them their Thanks.3:472
  • London city, A Great Riot in it occasioned by the Commitment of the Lord Mayor &c. to the Tower3:472
  • London city, Their petition to the King relative to the Act of Par- liament[ Parliament]for embarking the River Thames &c.3:528.

London city, Address of the Lord Mayor &c, to the King on the Birth of a Prince3:548 see index

  • London city, Choose Wilkes[ John Wilkes], &[ and]Bull, Sheriffs.3:556.
  • [no preceding index entries]

King his Answer to the Ad- dress[ Address], Remonstrance. &c, of the City of London3:557 see index

  • King, Severely censured by Junius3:566
  • King, An Address to him from an American, on the Op- ressions[ Oppressions]of America : a Charac- ter[ Character]drawn of the Americans, showing what notions they have of liberty &c.3:629.
  • King, He some time's[ sometimes]grants pardons before convictions, or sentence3:619.
  • King his Answer to the Ad- dress[ Address], Remonstrance. &c, of the City of London3:557

King, Severely censured by Junius3:566 see index

  • King, An Address to him from an American, on the Op- ressions[ Oppressions]of America : a Charac- ter[ Character]drawn of the Americans, showing what notions they have of liberty &c.3:629.
  • King, He some time's[ sometimes]grants pardons before convictions, or sentence3:619.
  • Kennedy's the Murderers respi- ted[ respited] 3:149
  • Martin Henry, appointed Governor of North Carolina, in the Room of Tryon[ William Tryon] 3:385.
  • Mucious Scævola, an excell- ent[ excellent]peice[ piece]of his on the Inde- pendency[ Independency]of British Ameri- can[ American]Colonies, and on our Charter3:413.
  • Mucious Scævola, His peice[ piece]on the Conduct of Andrew Oliver relative to his deposition. &c; defines what a Traytor[ Traitor], and Pe r jury[ Perjury]is, and proves that Junius Americanus's Asser- tion[ Assertion], respecting him, is well Supported3:594.

Mucious Scævola, He declares that Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], by Ac- cepting[ Accepting]his pay from the King, and becoming Independent of the People, is no legal Governor but an Usurper, and ought to be punished. &c.3:612. see index

  • King his Answer to the Ad- dress[ Address], Remonstrance. &c, of the City of London3:557
  • King, Severely censured by Junius3:566
  • King, An Address to him from an American, on the Op- ressions[ Oppressions]of America : a Charac- ter[ Character]drawn of the Americans, showing what notions they have of liberty &c.3:629.

King, He some time's[ sometimes]grants pardons before convictions, or sentence3:619. see index

  • Kennedy's the Murderers respi- ted[ respited] 3:149
  • Kennedy Pardoned3:489
  • King of Spain represented as a Fool, vid a ludicrous Letter3:323
  • Printers, Brought before the Lord Mayor, &[ and]Alderman by Vertue[ Virtue]of the Kings Procla- mation[ Proclamation], &[ and]discharged.3:471.

Pardons, the King some times gives them, before Con- viction[ Conviction], or Sentence.3:619. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Address to the Patriots in Great Britain &[ and]Ireland urging them to stand firm in the cause of liberty, and in order to preserve it, to set up Annual Lectures. &c.3:613
  • Address to Governor Hut- chinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], a smart one, charges him with usurpation. &c.3:614
  • Address to the British Par- liament[ Parliament]by an American, showing the Folly of oppressing America, She must, and finally will be Independent &c.3:627

Address to the King from an American, on the oppressions of Americans, shows what their Notions of Liberty are. &c.3:629 see index

  • Address by American Solon to the Americans, on account of their Liberties, urges them (up)
  • King his Answer to the Ad- dress[ Address], Remonstrance. &c, of the City of London3:557
  • King, Severely censured by Junius3:566

King, An Address to him from an American, on the Op- ressions[ Oppressions]of America : a Charac- ter[ Character]drawn of the Americans, showing what notions they have of liberty &c.3:629. see index

  • King, He some time's[ sometimes]grants pardons before convictions, or sentence3:619.
  • Kennedy's the Murderers respi- ted[ respited] 3:149
  • Kennedy Pardoned3:489
  • Lords Protest, against addressing the King on the Convention with Spain. &c.3:449
  • Land at New York gran- ted[ granted]away from the honest Owners, by Governor Tryon[ William Tryon], by ver- tue[ virtue]of a Ministered Man- date[ Mandate]&c.3:635.
  • Lectures Annual politi- cal[ political], Town of Boston vote to have, and an orator to de- claim[ declaim] 3:442

Lawyers, pleading's for the King against the Sol- diers[ Soldiers], concerned in the Bos- ton[ Boston]Massacre.3:793. 3:838. see index

  • Lawyers, For the Pri- soners[ Prisoners] 3:852. 3:919. 3:933.
  • Lovel, James[ James Lovell], his Oration to Com me morate[ Commemorate]the Boston Massacre. &c.3:1004
  • M
  • Queries Concerning our Charter, addressed to Johan- nes[ Johannes]in Eremo.3:391.
  • Queries of Johannes in Eremo on our Charter; and the Nature of our Subjection to King Great Britain3:413.

Quincy Samuel, his pleadings for the King, on the Trial of the Soldiers concerned in the Boston Mas- sacre.[ Massacre] 3:793. 3:838. see index

  • Quincy Josiah, his Pleadings for the Soldiers on the same Trial.3:852. 3:919.
  • Whitfield. George Reverend Much lamented by the Countess of Huntingdon, vid her Letter.3:423.
  • Whitfield. George Reverend His Last Will, the Estate he left, &c.3:449.
  • War in America, the Expence of it to Great Britain.3:317.

Witness for the King on, the Tryal[ Trial]of the Soldiers.3:794. see index

  • Witness For the Prisoners.3:882
  • Town of Boston, Their Inha- bitants[ Inhabitants]Massacred, and the vigorous efforts made by them, to rid the Town of the Troops. Etc.3:60. 3:61.
  • Merchants & Traders, See under Mer- chants.[ Merchants]Etc.
  • Troops, made to evacuate the Town of Boston, by the Spirited Conduct of the In- habitants.[ Inhabitants] 3:61. 3:64.

Troops, King may Sta- tion[ Station]them where he pleases.3:974. see index

  • Troops, Liberty al- ways[ always]in danger from them.3:1011.
  • Troops, See also Soldiers.
  • Trade Acts. vid Acts of Trade.
  • Treasurers of the Province of South Carolina, Commit ted[ Committed]to Goal[ Jail]for Contempt of the House &c.3:619.
  • Trowbridge. Edmund Judge, his Charge to the Jury on the Trial of the Soldiers.3:963.

Treason in Resisting the King Troops.3:976. see index

  • Tarring & Feathering. see under Informer.
  • Distance From London &c to Madrid, with the Inter- mediate[ Intermediate]places3:366
  • Debt National. vid Na- tional[ National]Debt.
  • Declaration of the King of Spain, wherein he agrees to Give up Falkland Islands, &c. which the King accepts3:438

Declaration of the King of Spain, Declared in the House of Commons, Infamous3:Ibid. see index

  • Declaration of the King of Spain, Ratified3:450
  • Duke of Bedford, his Death &c3:447
  • Doctors degree, confer'd[ conferred]by Harvard College on Reverend Mr. Appleton3:517
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachu- setts[ Massachusetts]Bay, Satirized for his Conformity to the Church3:437
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachu- setts[ Massachusetts]Bay, His Speech to the General Court, desires they would encourage the the raising of Men for the King, &c.3:441
  • Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachu- setts[ Massachusetts]Bay, Invited to an entertainment at Harvard College, an account of the Parade, anthem &c. on the occasion3:441

Hutchinson Thomas Governor of the Massachu- setts[ Massachusetts]Bay, Issues a procla- mation[ proclamation], to recruit the Kings Troops3:Ibid see index

  • [no following entries]
  • King's Answer to the address of both Houses of Parliament on the City address3:132.
  • King's Threatened3:130.

King's A Prophecy, con- cerning.[ concerning]&c.3:Ibid. see index

  • King's His Speech to the Parliament, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]them, after the partial Repeal of the Tea Act.3:177.
  • King's His Answer to the 2nd Remonstrance of the City of London3:184.
  • King's His Answer to the Address of the City of London, on the Birth of a Princess.3:211.
  • Resolves of the Repre- sentatives[ Representatives]of New York, respec- ting[ respecting]the Exclusion of Judge Leving- stone[ Levingstone]from a Seat in the House.3:404.
  • Resolves of the Society of the Bill of Rights, respecting Swearing Candidates for Members of Parliament, to endeavour[ endeavor]to get a Bill passed to Shorten the duration of Parliaments. &c.3:548.
  • Representatives of North Carolina, their Resolves against the Parliament of Great Britain, laying any Taxes on them, &[ and]against the Resolves of the Lords, &[ and]Common relative to America.3:21.

Representatives of North Carolina, Their address to the King, on the same.3:Ibid. see index

  • Representatives of North Carolina, They pass the Riot Act, in order to Try the Regulators.3:474.
  • Representatives of North Carolina, They pass an Act, to raise an Army to go against the Regulators.3:Ibid.
  • Regulators of North Caro- lina[ Carolina], a vote in their Assembly, Referring to them.3:22
  • [no preceding index entries]

Letter of Junius to the King 37 see index

  • Letter From Junius Ame- ricanus, to Governor Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard] 3:19
  • Letter To Lord Hills- borough[ Hillsborough] [ Wills Hill], on the new appoint- ment[ appointment]of Judges of the Court of vice admiralty, with their Character3:55 3:82
  • Letter From the Bos- ton[ Boston]Committee, giving an Account of the Massacre3:64
  • Great Britain, the great advantages they receive from the Colonies.4:1,4:1259.
  • Great Britain, she could not man a Fleet without them. vid. Britain Great.4:1259.
  • Greenleaf Joseph, dismissed from his office by the Governor & Council: an account of the whole Affair.4:7.

Grenades Island's of Gen'ral[ General]Leybourn[ William L. Leybourne ]arrives there, and Attempts to introduce Roman Catholics into the As- sembly[ Assembly], &c, by a mandate from the King.4:9. see index

  • Grenades Islands Councellors there, suspend- ed[ suspended][diamond]
  • Governors, a history of the de- bates[ debates]respecting their Salary, &c,4:20.
  • Governors, and other Officers, on their Independancy: Vide Independancy.
  • [no preceding index entries]

King George an attempt to shoot him.4:12. see index

  • King George sometimes interposes in a cri- minal[ criminal]case, before sentence in passed.4:33.
  • King George his Speech to the Parlia- ment[ Parliament].4:52.
  • King George his Speech, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]the Parliament.4:133.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Whisperer, a smart Pa- per[ Paper]published in England, containing an Account of the fire at Portsmouth, and an Attempt to shoot the King: also an Account of Corrupt Mi- nisters[ Ministers], &c.4:12. see index

  • Warren Joseph, pro- nounces[ pronounces]an Oration in Boston, in Town Meeting.4:39.4:693.
  • Warren Joseph, Killed in Battle at Bunker Hill, an eulogium on him.4:757.4:770.
  • Warren Joseph, his Body found, and very honorably buried.4:925.
  • King George an attempt to shoot him.4:12.

King George sometimes interposes in a cri- minal[ criminal]case, before sentence in passed.4:33. see index

  • King George his Speech to the Parlia- ment[ Parliament].4:52.
  • King George his Speech, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]the Parliament.4:133.
  • King George a smart Letter to him.4:139.
  • Tryon[ William Tryon]Governor, his procla- mation[ proclamation], especially Land in dispute.4:4.

Tryon[ William Tryon]Governor, his message to the House of Representatives, declines taking his salary from them: lays the Kings instruction before them prohibiting him to take it, &c.4:41. see index

  • Town of Boston meet, and have an Oration delivered by[ Doctor]Warren[ Joseph Warren], &c.4:39.
  • Town of Boston, their valuation. 118.
  • Town of Boston, meet on occasion of the Judges being made independant: their message to the governor, and other trans- actions[ transactions], relative to it.4:175.
  • Parliament for Middlesex, chosen.4:636.
  • Parliament no authority over the Colonies except to regulate trade, and that, only from the necessity of the case, &c,4:660.
  • Prison, never intended a place of Punishment.4:24.

Pardon from the King for Ebenezer Richardson, arrives.4:45. see index

  • Petition of the Clergy of the Church of England, to dispense with the 39 Articles.4:570
  • Rome George, a vile Letter of his; says the Colonies ought to lose their Char- ters[ Charters], &c.4:312.
  • Rome George examined by the Rhode Island Assembly, and committed to Good.4:392.
  • Richardson Ebenezer, the Murderer, an enquiry why he is not exe- cuted[ executed], &c.4:24.

Richardson Ebenezer, let out of Goal[ Jail]by the Kings pardone.4:45. see index

  • Richardson Ebenezer, Appointed to a place place in the customs.4:294.
  • Richardson Ebenezer, Arrives at Philadelphia4:323.
  • Richardson Ebenezer, an advertisement to take him up, tar, and feather him.4:386.
  • Duke of Cumberland ditto no illegal.4:45.
  • * Debates in the Irish House of Commons, on augmenting the Officers of the Revenue there: give Governor Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard]his true character,&c.4:39.
  • Debates in the House of Commons of Great Britain ; vide Commons House of in Great Britain.

Denmark Queen of, imprisoned (for attempting to poinson the King.) with her paramour, &c.4:52. see index

  • Denmark Queen of, sentenced.4:107.
  • Denmark Queen of, a revolution there, on the same account.4:52.
  • Denmark Queen of, a Fleet to sail there, to see Justice done the Queen.4:101.
  • King George an attempt to shoot him.4:12.
  • King George sometimes interposes in a cri- minal[ criminal]case, before sentence in passed.4:33.

King George his Speech to the Parlia- ment[ Parliament].4:52. see index

  • King George his Speech, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]the Parliament.4:133.
  • King George a smart Letter to him.4:139.
  • King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament]; very insipid; chiefly on the affairs of the East india Company.4:238.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor much blamed for delivering the Castle to the Re- gular[ Regular]Troops: queries propounded to him on that subject, &c,4:47.

Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his Speech to the General Court, will let them set in Boston, if they wont deny the kings Right to remove them by instructions, &c, &c, and purposes the erection of new Courts, &c.4:59. see index

  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor he has done more real hurt to new England, than can be easily imagined.4:61.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his Speech to the General Court when he dissolved them: insists that the King has a right to keep the Court where he thinks proper.4:69.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor Comments on the above Speech: his political character set in an ill light.4:71,4:72,4:73.
  • Richardson Ebenezer, pursued at Philadelphia and drove off.4:388.
  • Richardson Ebenezer, gets back to Stoneham.4:400.
  • Royal Family, an Ac- count[ Account]when they were born, &c,4:58.

Representatives of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, their reply to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]s Speech, refuse to acknowledge the King's right to remove them by Instructions, &c,4:61. see index

  • Representatives of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, their Answer to the Governor Speech, beg that he would remove the Court to Boston, &c4:90.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Ministers of State, their man- dates[ mandates]or orders, not always from the King. &c,4:64. see index

  • Ministers of the congregational perswasion in the Province of Massa.[ Massachusetts]Bay, are men of good characters, and are proper ministers, without ordaination.4:221.
  • Ministers of the Gospel, said to be rulers, &c, and havea right to a negative vote.4:330.
  • Ministers may be dismissed by the Church without any advice of Council, as the reverend Mr. Goss was.4:355.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor much blamed for delivering the Castle to the Re- gular[ Regular]Troops: queries propounded to him on that subject, &c,4:47.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his Speech to the General Court, will let them set in Boston, if they wont deny the kings Right to remove them by instructions, &c, &c, and purposes the erection of new Courts, &c.4:59.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor he has done more real hurt to new England, than can be easily imagined.4:61.

Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his Speech to the General Court when he dissolved them: insists that the King has a right to keep the Court where he thinks proper.4:69. see index

  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor Comments on the above Speech: his political character set in an ill light.4:71,4:72,4:73.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his Speech to the General Court on the opening of it at the Election.4:88.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his reply to the message of the House: tells them he will remove the Court if he can, consistent with his duty to the King, &c.4:90.
  • Juryman, Fined.4:437.
  • Irish House of Com- mons[ Commons]. See Commons House of, in Ireland.
  • Instructions to Governor Try- on[ William Tryon], forbidding him to take any pay from the House of Representatives, &c,4:41.

Instructions from the King, said by Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]to be a part of the Constitution.4:69. see index

  • Instructions spirited ones from the Town of Boston, to their Representatives; take particular no- tice[ notice]of our oppressions, & Govr.[ Governor]Hut- chinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]'s independancy, &,4:83.
  • Instructions to the Represent- atives[ Representatives]of the Town of Roxbury, on the independancy of the Judges.4:189.
  • Instructions to the Representatives of the Town of Cambridge, on the same and other grievances.4:202.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his Speech to the General Court when he dissolved them: insists that the King has a right to keep the Court where he thinks proper.4:69.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor Comments on the above Speech: his political character set in an ill light.4:71,4:72,4:73.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his Speech to the General Court on the opening of it at the Election.4:88.

Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his reply to the message of the House: tells them he will remove the Court if he can, consistent with his duty to the King, &c.4:90. see index

  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his message to the House, desires them to explain something in their message, &c,4:92.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his reply to the message of the House: tells them that he will not remove the Court to Boston, while they dispute the Kings Right, &c.4:Ibid.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor censured for his conduct re- lative[ relative]to his removal of the Court to Bos- ton[ Boston].4:92,4:93,4:96,4:97,4:179.
  • Representatives of the Massachusetts Bay, vid, page4:47, & State of Massachusetts Bay, Assemb- ly[ Assembly]& Congress Provincial, &c [s-shape reference mark]
  • Regulators, the remains of them in North Carolina, submit to Justice, &c,4:73.

Rhode Island People burn the Kings Schooner Gaspee,4:97,4:101. see index

  • Rhode Island news of it arrives in England.4:173
  • Rhode Island Commissioners appoint to enquire into the burning of it; sail; and Ac- count[ Account]of the Judges, &c, relative to that affair.4:202.
  • Rhode Island (a) remove Guns from ye[ the]Forts, &c.4:632.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, a List of their names who voted pro, & Con.4:Ib.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, they remonstrate to the Governor, & Council, against Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], for taking his pay from the King. vid the remonst- rance[ remonstrance].4:452.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, they, and the Council re- solve[ resolve]to adjourn the Superior Court, which the Governor will not assent to.4:453.

Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their Message to the Council, respecting Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]'s taking his pay from the King.4:Ib. see index

  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their petition to the Governor praying him to remove Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]: the whole House wait on him.4:Ib.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, Impeach Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver].4:455,4:458,4:459.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, a List of those who voted pro, & Con.4:459.
  • Denmark Queen of, sentenced.4:107.
  • Denmark Queen of, a revolution there, on the same account.4:52.
  • Denmark Queen of, a Fleet to sail there, to see Justice done the Queen.4:101.

Denmark Queen of, the execution of the sentence there, against the conspirators against the King, &c4:120. see index

  • Dowager Princess of Wales, See Princess Dowager of Wales.
  • Dissenters in America, very candid no persecution there on account of religious Tenets: more liberal in their sentiments, and less disposed to persecute than the Church of England in great Britain.4:148.
  • Darmouth[ William Legge], Lord appointed Secretary of State for the Colonies.4:164.
  • King George an attempt to shoot him.4:12.
  • King George sometimes interposes in a cri- minal[ criminal]case, before sentence in passed.4:33.
  • King George his Speech to the Parlia- ment[ Parliament].4:52.

King George his Speech, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]the Parliament.4:133. see index

  • King George a smart Letter to him.4:139.
  • King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament]; very insipid; chiefly on the affairs of the East india Company.4:238.
  • King George his Answer to the Remon- strance[ Remonstrance], &c, of the city of London, wherein he treats them in a very scurvy manner, and tells them, that they are not serious, &c.4:293.
  • Lucas Charles a pension to his Family.4:52.
  • Letter, concerning the behaviour[ behavior]of high flying Clergymen: and some of their expressions censured.4:23.
  • Letter of Junius Americanus, on Governor Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]s perjury. &c,4:55.

a very smart one to the King.4:139. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • King George sometimes interposes in a cri- minal[ criminal]case, before sentence in passed.4:33.
  • King George his Speech to the Parlia- ment[ Parliament].4:52.
  • King George his Speech, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]the Parliament.4:133.

King George a smart Letter to him.4:139. see index

  • King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament]; very insipid; chiefly on the affairs of the East india Company.4:238.
  • King George his Answer to the Remon- strance[ Remonstrance], &c, of the city of London, wherein he treats them in a very scurvy manner, and tells them, that they are not serious, &c.4:293.
  • King George a Shocking Character drawn of him.4:306,4:745,4:749,4:811,4:971.
  • Falkland Islands ; the Spainards won't[ will not]deliver them up agreable[ agreeable]to Convention.4:19.
  • Falkland Islands delivered up.4:35.
  • Freemasons walk in procession, and hear a Sermon.4:104.

Franklin[ William Franklin]Governor his Speech to the New Jersey Assembly, tell's them the King has made the chief Judge independant, by granting him his Salary, &c,4:141. see index

  • Franklin[ William Franklin]Governor his Speech to the same, chief- ly[ chiefly]on the troubles of America : dislikes the meeting of the Colonies in Congress, &c,4:662.
  • Franklin[ William Franklin]Governor his Answer to the address of Council.4:681.
  • Franklin[ William Franklin]Governor his reply to the address of the House, in answer to his Speech,4:Ibid.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]Impeached by the (King, say) Houses.4:455.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]of South Carolina, his whig charge to the Jury.4:682.
  • Judges appointed in the Room of Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing], resign'd[ resigned].4:11.

Judges a report that they are to have salaries independant of the People: if that is done, America will be completely ruined, and enslaved: our Judges notwithstanding the Governor nominates them by Charter, &c, yet it is much the same as if the King should appoint them.4:141,4:175. see index

  • Judges &c, of the Massachusetts Bay, have salaries from the King: their salaries.4:156,4:452.
  • America : the profits to Great Britain, from her trade.4:516.4:829.
  • America by her trade with Great Bri- tain[ Britain], sacrifices 6000,000. Sterling. per annum.4:1
  • America will soon be independent of Great Britain.4:37.

America of what vast importance to Great Britain : the extent of it: will be the great- est[ greatest]Empire in the World: the King of Great Bri- tain[ Britain]in time it's probable will fix his empire there, &c, and great Britain become dependant on her, &c.4:148. see index

  • America the importance of to Great Britain : the unkindness, and neglect she treats her with.4:159.
  • America would be justified in forming an independent Government, and cutting off her enemies.4:179.
  • America never received any protection from Great Britain, till[ until]last war, and that, she paid amply for.4:661,4:666.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]of South Carolina, his whig charge to the Jury.4:682.
  • Judges appointed in the Room of Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing], resign'd[ resigned].4:11.
  • Judges a report that they are to have salaries independant of the People: if that is done, America will be completely ruined, and enslaved: our Judges notwithstanding the Governor nominates them by Charter, &c, yet it is much the same as if the King should appoint them.4:141,4:175.

Judges &c, of the Massachusetts Bay, have salaries from the King: their salaries.4:156,4:452. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Anniversary of the 14th August, celebrated at Boston.4:988.4:993.
  • Adjournment of the General Court to Boston.4:97.
  • Act, [diamond] a Valuation Act passed.4:117.

Act of Parliament, against burning the Kings Ships, &c.4:176 see index

  • Act of Parliament, called the Tea Act: the preamble to it.4:251.
  • Act of Parliament, Governours[ Goverenors], &c, can only be paid from it.4:380.
  • Act of Parliament, Granting Liberty to the east india House, to export Tea to America, free from duty, &c.4:379
  • Address To the same, on the power of Parliament, &c.4:36.
  • Address To the same, on Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]'s refusing to let the Court meet, &c4:39.
  • Address From the Commons of Geor- gia[ Georgia]to the President.4:95.

Address To the People of America, from an American, urging them to send a Re- monstrance[ Remonstrance]to the King, relative to the Grievances of America, and if he wont[ will not]relieve them, to break off from him, and set up a Common Wealth, &c.4:176. see index

  • Address To Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], draw- ing[ drawing]his political Character, and charging him with aiding Governor Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard]in enslaving the Co- lonies[ Colonies], and that he had a lust of Avarice, and Am- bition[ Ambition], &c.4:246. 4:288. 4:347.
  • Address To the free Electors of the Massachusetts Bay, urging them on their next choice, to choose men that will adpot vigorous measures, that we may be freed from difficul- ties[ difficulties]that we are involved in.4:280.
  • Commisssioners, Adjourn the Court.4:223.
  • Commisssioners, meet again at Rhode Island, and do Business.4:302.
  • Commisssioners, adjourn the Court without day, and end the business.4:317.

Commisssioners, from King Charles visit the Massachusetts Bay Colony: the Court will not acknowledge them, &c.4:202. see index

  • Commisssioners, for Settling the Line between New York, and this Province, return, have agreed, and settled it.4:295.
  • Commisssioners, appinted to settle the American dispute, being Lord & General Howe[ William Howe]: the terms, & c: the negociation came to nothing.4:979.4:1016,4:1019.
  • Commisssioners for Indians.4:800.
  • King George his Speech to the Parlia- ment[ Parliament].4:52.
  • King George his Speech, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]the Parliament.4:133.
  • King George a smart Letter to him.4:139.

King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament]; very insipid; chiefly on the affairs of the East india Company.4:238. see index

  • King George his Answer to the Remon- strance[ Remonstrance], &c, of the city of London, wherein he treats them in a very scurvy manner, and tells them, that they are not serious, &c.4:293.
  • King George a Shocking Character drawn of him.4:306,4:745,4:749,4:811,4:971.
  • King George what his Revenue is,4:306.
  • Representatives of the Pro- vince[ Province]of the Massachusetts Bay, their Answer to the Governor Speech, wherein they define their Constitution very exactly: shew that the Colonies are free States, &c,4:229.
  • Representatives of the Pro- vince[ Province]of the Massachusetts Bay, were unanimous in their Answer.4:228.4:231.
  • Representatives of the Pro- vince[ Province]of the Massachusetts Bay, their Message to the Governor desire to know why he will not sign the Grants made the Judges, &c,4:235.

Representatives of the Pro- vince[ Province]of the Massachusetts Bay, their reply to the Governor Message on the independancy of the Judges, say that Judge who has a regard to his Character, will not accept his pay from the King, &c, &c,4:239. see index

  • Representatives of the Pro- vince[ Province]of the Massachusetts Bay, another to the Governor on the same.4:244.
  • Representatives of the Pro- vince[ Province]of the Massachusetts Bay, their reply to the Governor Speech, respecting repairing his House, decline it.4:246.
  • Representatives of the Pro- vince[ Province]of the Massachusetts Bay, vote the Judge's Salaries.4:223,4:246.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, his reply to the message of the House, excusing his not signing the Grant made to the Judge, &c,4:235.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, an address to him, charging him with aiding Governor Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard]in his en- deavours[ endeavors]to enslave us, blames him much for his Speech to the General Court, asserting the supremacy of Parliament, &c: and charges him with ambition and avarice,4:288,4:347.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, his reply to the answers of both Houses, in answer to his Speech on the supremacy of Parliament over the Colo- nies[ Colonies], &c.4:242.

Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, his Reply to the House tells them that he dont[ do not]know whether the Judges will refuse the pay from the King, or no, &c.4:244. see index

  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, his message to the House: begs, that they would repair the Province House.4:246.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, his message to the House, informs them, that he can't[ cannot]consent to the Grants made the Judges for the Year to come, &c.4:Ibid.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, his reply to the House, refuses to lend the Province Arms, &c,4:252.
  • Votes of the Province of Ma- ryland[ Maryland], to form a Militia.4:641.
  • Votes and recommendations of the Province of New Hampshire, adopt- ing[ adopting]the Proceedings of the Continental Congress, &c, &c.4:680.
  • Vendue of the Ministry.4:470.

Vendue Act of the Massachusetts Bay.4:248.4:318.-Disallowed by the king.4:534. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Rhode Island pass an Act; renouncing the Kings Name in all Processes, &c,4:939.
  • Rhode Island their proceedings, and Resolves respecting the Boston Port Act: &c vote, and choose members for a Congress, &c,4:517. See State of Rhode Island.
  • Resolve's of the Representative of the Massachusetts Bay, on Governor Hut- chinson[ Hutchinson]'s Independancy, resolve by his being independant, that he is not a Governor agreable[ agreeable]to the Charter, &c, &c.4:112.

Resolve's against the declaratory Act, and the Judges taking their pay from the King: say if they take it, they are ene- mies[ enemies]to their Country, &c, &c.4:251. see index

  • Resolve's respecting choosing Com- mittees[ Committees]of Correspondence, &c,4:298.
  • Resolve's against Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], & Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], respecting their Letters, &c,4:309.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Address. Petition, and Remonstrance of the City of London to the King, on their Grievances.4:283 see index

  • Address to Britain, and America ; offers a Plan.4:334. 4:367.
  • Address To the Tea Commissioners, appoint- ed[ appointed]by the east india[ East India]Company to act in America.4:383. 4:386. 4:390.
  • Address of Lord Mayor Bull[ Frederick Bull], to the Livery of London, requesting their votes for a seat in the House of Commons.4:451.
  • London city of: their proceed- ings[ proceedings], when Mr. Townsend[ James Townsend]was chosen[ Lord]Mayor.4:205.

London their address, Petition, &c, to the King on their Grievances.4:283. see index

  • London their proceedings, when Mr. Bull[ Frederick Bull]was chosen[ Lord]Mayor.4:408.
  • London wait upon the King by the Lord Mayor, &c, to present a Petition against the Quebec Bill, which he will not receive.4:553,4:555.
  • London their proceedings in choos- ing[ choosing]a Lord Mayor, &c,4:615.
  • Petition of the Town of Boston, to the Governor on the same.4:176.
  • Petition of the inhabitants of Plymouth, to call a meeting on the danger- ous[ dangerous]times, &c.4:186.
  • Petition of the Town of Mar- blehead[ Marblehead], on the independancy of the Jud- ges[ Judges], and other grievances.4:193.

Petition addresss, &c, of the city of London to the King, on their grievan- ces[ grievances].4:283. see index

  • Petition why not heared: coming from the Colonies.4:359.
  • Petition from the Weavers to the King, shewing[ showing]their distressed condit- ion[ condition], chiefly owing to the contest with ye[ the]Colonies.4:316.
  • Petition of Richard Clarke, and others, Tea Consignees, to the Governor &c,4:419.
  • Roxbury, See Town of.
  • Religious Assemblies in New England, the Number of.4:123.
  • Revenue from America, produ- ces[ produces]nothing to Great Britain.4:261.

Remonstrance, Petition and Ad- dress[ Address]of the city of London to the King on their Grievances.4:283. see index

  • Remonstrance of the Town of Billeri- ca[ Billerica]to Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage], relative to the tarring, &c, a man by the Troops.4:697.
  • Rogers Nathaniel resolves of the House of[ Representatives]of Massachusetts Bay, relative to his Letters.4:309.
  • Rogers Nathaniel sollicits[ solicits]for the place of Secretary, and negotiates with Andrew Oliver therefor[ therefore].4:1181.
  • Whig- definition of one.4:81.
  • Wilkes John, has most votes for Lord Mayor, - his Speech, &c.4:191.
  • Wilkes John, his Speech when he failed in his election of Lord Mayor.4:205.

Wilkes John, his amswer, when he refused to wait on the King, with the London Petition, &c.4:283. see index

  • Wilkes John, summoned to attend the Parliament.4:305.
  • Wilkes John, his Letter to the speak- er[ speaker]of the House, on his being summoned. Ib.
  • Wilkes John, denied Admittance in Parliament.4:316.
  • Justice Greenleaf, how their Commissions run: how made in England.4:Ibid.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]resign.4:11.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]chief of New Jersey made Independant.4:141.

Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]chief of New York has a Salary from the King.4:284. see index

  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], censured by the House of Representatives, as a corrupt Judge, for taking his pay from ye[ the]King.4:449.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]Impeached by the (King, say) Houses.4:455.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]of South Carolina, his whig charge to the Jury.4:682.
  • King George his Speech, when he pro- rogued[ prorogued]the Parliament.4:133.
  • King George a smart Letter to him.4:139.
  • King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament]; very insipid; chiefly on the affairs of the East india Company.4:238.

King George his Answer to the Remon- strance[ Remonstrance], &c, of the city of London, wherein he treats them in a very scurvy manner, and tells them, that they are not serious, &c.4:293. see index

  • King George a Shocking Character drawn of him.4:306,4:745,4:749,4:811,4:971.
  • King George what his Revenue is,4:306.
  • King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament], when he prorogued it.4:351.
  • King George a smart Letter to him.4:139.
  • King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament]; very insipid; chiefly on the affairs of the East india Company.4:238.
  • King George his Answer to the Remon- strance[ Remonstrance], &c, of the city of London, wherein he treats them in a very scurvy manner, and tells them, that they are not serious, &c.4:293.

King George a Shocking Character drawn of him.4:306,4:745,4:749,4:811,4:971. see index

  • King George what his Revenue is,4:306.
  • King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament], when he prorogued it.4:351.
  • King George Speech, substance of.4:472
  • King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament]; very insipid; chiefly on the affairs of the East india Company.4:238.
  • King George his Answer to the Remon- strance[ Remonstrance], &c, of the city of London, wherein he treats them in a very scurvy manner, and tells them, that they are not serious, &c.4:293.
  • King George a Shocking Character drawn of him.4:306,4:745,4:749,4:811,4:971.

King George what his Revenue is,4:306. see index

  • King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament], when he prorogued it.4:351.
  • King George Speech, substance of.4:472
  • King George his Message to the Parliament, on account of the disorders in America, particularly Boston, on Account of the east India Company 's Tea.4:495.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, his original traiterous Let- ters[ Letters]arrives: his speech to the House respect- ing[ respecting]them.4:303.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, his reply to the message of the House on his Letters, refuses to let them see his Copies, &c.4:306.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, resolves against him by the House of Representatives on his Letters, &c,4:309.

Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, remonstrated against by the House, praying the King to remove him forever.4:309,4:317. see index

  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, a smart Letter to him respecting his Letters; charging him as the author of our grievances, &c,4:309,4:316.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, his reply to the message of the Council, desiring to see a copy of his Letters, &c,4:311.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, his message to the House reminds them that they have sat near a month and done nothing, &c,4:312.
  • Oliver Andrew, Lieutenant Governor, House of Representatives, resolve against him, respecting his Letters.4:309.

Oliver Andrew, Lieutenant Governor, Remonstrated against to the King, by the House of Representatives, praying him to remove him forever.4:309,4:317. see index

  • Oliver Andrew, Lieutenant Governor, his Letter to the Secreta- ry[ Secretary], respecting his Letters being set by the Board.4:311.
  • Oliver Andrew, Lieutenant Governor, a Letter against him, by Junius Americanus, on his treachery. &c,4:55.
  • Oliver Andrew, Lieutenant Governor, resolves against him by the Council, respecting his Letters.4:313.
  • Petition of the Town of Mar- blehead[ Marblehead], on the independancy of the Jud- ges[ Judges], and other grievances.4:193.
  • Petition addresss, &c, of the city of London to the King, on their grievan- ces[ grievances].4:283.
  • Petition why not heared: coming from the Colonies.4:359.

Petition from the Weavers to the King, shewing[ showing]their distressed condit- ion[ condition], chiefly owing to the contest with ye[ the]Colonies.4:316. see index

  • Petition of Richard Clarke, and others, Tea Consignees, to the Governor &c,4:419.
  • Petition of the Represent- atives[ Representatives]of the Massachusetts Bay, to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], praying him to remove Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]from the Bench.4:453.
  • Petition of the same body, to the King, praying him to remove Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], &c heated with con- tempt[ contempt], and dismist[ dismissed]: a particular Account of it.4:487,4:488. the substance of the petition.4:486.
  • Writ of Assistance, their nature, and tendency pointed out; an attempt to introduce them in Connecticut : Acts of Parliament establishing them, &c,4:272.
  • Wobourn[ Woburn], see Town of.

Weavers, their Petition to the King4:316. see index

  • Westborough, see Town of.
  • Walley John Reverend installed over the Church in Boston, in the room of Mr. Goss, who was dismist[ dismissed]by the Church contrary to the advice of a Council.4:355.
  • Wells, see Town of
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, send a Message to the Council, on the Letters of Governor Hutchin- son[ Thomas Hutchinson], & Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], &c,4:311.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, send a Message to the Council, tell them, when the Governor &c, Letters are authenticated, that they will furnish the Board with the originals.4:Ib.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their Message to the Governor, in reply to him, tell him, that they ought in faithfulness to the People, pub- lish[ publish]his letters, &c; and that they are the only Judges of the Time they ought to sit, &c,4:312.

Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, they pass a remonstrance, and petition the King, praying him to remove Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], & Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]: their names who voted, pro, &Con.4:317. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • [no preceding index entries]

Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, resolve on the dependancy of the Judges on the King for their pay, &c, declare they ought to be impeached, &c,4:318. see index

  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their message to the Governor because he declined to pass Bills, as the dates &c, were in English.4:321.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their reply to the Governor Speech, justify, wherein their choosing Committees of Correspondence, &c.4:449.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their proceedings against Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], for taking his pay from the King.4:Ibid.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, his message to the House de- sires[ desires]to have attested copies of their resolves a- gainst[ against]him.4:Ib.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, his message to the Council: tax- es[ taxes]them with disrespect, because they would not leave his Letters with him.4:Ibid.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, Resolve's against him by the Council, respecting his Letters,4:313.

Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor, his message to the General Court: wont sign the Bills, because the year of the Kings Regin &c, is in English.4:321. see index

  • King George his Answer to the Remon- strance[ Remonstrance], &c, of the city of London, wherein he treats them in a very scurvy manner, and tells them, that they are not serious, &c.4:293.
  • King George a Shocking Character drawn of him.4:306,4:745,4:749,4:811,4:971.
  • King George what his Revenue is,4:306.

King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament], when he prorogued it.4:351. see index

  • King George Speech, substance of.4:472
  • King George his Message to the Parliament, on account of the disorders in America, particularly Boston, on Account of the east India Company 's Tea.4:495.
  • King George his Speech to the Parlia- ment[ Parliament], after passing the American Bills for altering the Constitution of the Massachusetts Bay, &c.4:553.
  • Pennsylvania House of Representatives, Province of, meet in Convention, resolve to encourage manufact- ures[ manufactures], to abide by the proceedings of the Continental Congress. &c.4:684.
  • Plate, representing Governor Hutchin- son[ Thomas Hutchinson], as a very wicked statesman.4:295.
  • Plate exhibiting a virtuous Patriot, at the house of Death.4:Ibid.

Prussia King of[ Frederick II], grown a great Tyrant.4:410,4:452. see index

  • Portsmouth in Newhampshire[ New Hampshire], see Town of.
  • Prudence, political, what.4:418.
  • Probate Court of, and Court for determining Marriages, and Divorces: the Governor instructed not to put a negative on the determination of the major part.4:445,4:449.
  • Instructions very spirited one from the Town of Boston to their Represent- avies atives[ Representatives], urging them to apply to the other Colonies, &c,4:287.
  • Instructions to the Representatives of the Town of Lancaster, on their Grie- vances[ Grievances], &c,4:291.
  • Instructions to the Representatives of the Town of Andover, on their Grievan- ces[ Grievances], &c,4:322.

Instructions from the King, sometimes made here by the Governors, and then sent home to be adopted to Screen them.4:445. see index

  • Instructions from the Provincial Deputy's of Virginia, to their Members of the Continental Congress.4:560.
  • Instructions from the Provincial Deputies of Pennsylvania, to their Re- presentatives[ Representatives], on the Grievances of America ; and instruct them to choose members for the Continental Congress. &c,4:544.
  • Instructions to the Representatives of the Town of Boston, and Members of the Provincial Congress, &c,4:583.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]resign.4:11.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]chief of New Jersey made Independant.4:141.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]chief of New York has a Salary from the King.4:284.

Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], censured by the House of Representatives, as a corrupt Judge, for taking his pay from ye[ the]King.4:449. see index

  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]Impeached by the (King, say) Houses.4:455.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]of South Carolina, his whig charge to the Jury.4:682.
  • Judges appointed in the Room of Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing], resign'd[ resigned].4:11.
  • Oliver Andrew, Lieutenant Governor, proposes a great alteration in the Council: to have a body of Esquires, &c. out of which the Council to be chosen.4:1171.
  • Oliver Andrew, Lieutenant Governor, says the Colonies must be represented in Parliament.4:1173.
  • Oliver Andrew, Lieutenant Governor, Sollicits[ Solicits]for a pension of £300 p Annum.4:1176.

Oliver Peter, Judge, pron- ounced[ pronounced]Corrupt, &c, by the House of Repre- sentatives[ Representatives]of Massachusetts Bay, for taking his pay from the King.4:449. see index

  • Oliver Peter, Judge, impeachment against him, by the House of Representatives,4:458,4:459.
  • Resolves of the Representatives of Massachusetts Bay, against the independ- ancy[ independancy]of the Judges, &c,4:318.

Resolves against Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], for taking his pay from the King, resolve that he is guilty of Corruption, &c,4:449. see index

  • Resolves that they have done all in their power to remove Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver].4:464.
  • Resolves on being removed to Salem.4:513.
  • Resolves to choose Members for a Continental Congress: on the Bos- ton[ Boston]Port Bill, &c, &c,4:517,4:522.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their reply to the Governor Speech, justify, wherein their choosing Committees of Correspondence, &c.4:449.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their proceedings against Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], for taking his pay from the King.4:Ibid.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, a List of their names who voted pro, & Con.4:Ib.

Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, they remonstrate to the Governor, & Council, against Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], for taking his pay from the King. vid the remonst- rance[ remonstrance].4:452. see index

  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, they, and the Council re- solve[ resolve]to adjourn the Superior Court, which the Governor will not assent to.4:453.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their Message to the Council, respecting Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]'s taking his pay from the King.4:Ib.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their petition to the Governor praying him to remove Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]: the whole House wait on him.4:Ib.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]chief of New Jersey made Independant.4:141.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]chief of New York has a Salary from the King.4:284.
  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], censured by the House of Representatives, as a corrupt Judge, for taking his pay from ye[ the]King.4:449.

Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]Impeached by the (King, say) Houses.4:455. see index

  • Judge Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing]of South Carolina, his whig charge to the Jury.4:682.
  • Judges appointed in the Room of Lynd[ Benjamin Lynde], & Cushing[ William Cushing], resign'd[ resigned].4:11.
  • Judges a report that they are to have salaries independant of the People: if that is done, America will be completely ruined, and enslaved: our Judges notwithstanding the Governor nominates them by Charter, &c, yet it is much the same as if the King should appoint them.4:141,4:175.
  • Judges, Appointed, to enquire into the Burning the Gaspee Schooner, See Commissi- ons[ Commissions].
  • Judges, of the Superior Court of the Massachusetts, raised their salaries.4:223,4:246.
  • Judges, the Governor wont sign ye[ the]grant for their salaries.4:225.

Judges, may be removed by an address of both Houses to the King.4:455. see index

  • Judges, four of them of the Proclamation of the Massachusetts bay, declare they will never take their pay from the King.4:458.
  • Judges, of Admiralty appointed by the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay.4:863.
  • Inhabitants in the Colonies, See Numbers in America.
  • Judges, of the Superior Court of the Massachusetts, raised their salaries.4:223,4:246.
  • Judges, the Governor wont sign ye[ the]grant for their salaries.4:225.
  • Judges, may be removed by an address of both Houses to the King.4:455.

Judges, four of them of the Proclamation of the Massachusetts bay, declare they will never take their pay from the King.4:458. see index

  • Judges, of Admiralty appointed by the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay.4:863.
  • Inhabitants in the Colonies, See Numbers in America.
  • Inhabitants proportion of, who are fight- ing[ fighting]men in any place.4:975.
  • Letter
  • Letter to Collector Harrison, on his absence from his Post.4:454.

Letter from Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], to the House of Representatives, declaring that he will take his pay from the King, &c,4:458. see index

  • Letter From Doctor Franklin, wherein he owns that he procured Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]'s, Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]'s Letters, &c; and sent them to the General Court, because the tend- ency[ tendency]of them were to incense the King, &c, against the Massachusetts Bay, &c,4:460.
  • Letter From John Temple, given an account of the duel fought by him with Mr. Whately.4:464.
  • Letter From a Bostonian, to Mr. Wedderburne, on his behaviour[ behavior]before the council, respecting the petition for removing Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], &c,4:490.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Oliver Peter, Judge, his Letter to the House of Representatives, declares that he will take his pay from the King, as a Judge, &c.4:458. see index

  • Oliver Peter, Judge, not capable to be a Judge of the Court.4:Ibid.
  • Oliver Peter, Judge, Thomas, made Lieu- tenant[ Lieutenant]Governor4:546.
  • Oliver Peter, Judge, his state of the case, rela- tive[ relative]to his resignation as Councellor.4:543.
  • Letter
  • Letter to Collector Harrison, on his absence from his Post.4:454.
  • Letter from Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], to the House of Representatives, declaring that he will take his pay from the King, &c,4:458.

Letter From Doctor Franklin, wherein he owns that he procured Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]'s, Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]'s Letters, &c; and sent them to the General Court, because the tend- ency[ tendency]of them were to incense the King, &c, against the Massachusetts Bay, &c,4:460. see index

  • Letter From John Temple, given an account of the duel fought by him with Mr. Whately.4:464.
  • Letter From a Bostonian, to Mr. Wedderburne, on his behaviour[ behavior]before the council, respecting the petition for removing Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], &c,4:490.
  • Letter from England, extracts from, given a relation of the shocking condition England is in, and the mea- sures[ measures]pursued against America,4:500,4:552.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his reply to the message of the Council respecting the impeachment of Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]: gives his sense of their power by Charter, &c,4:463.

Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his message to both Houses: tells them that their proceedings are a reflect- ion[ reflection]on the King and Parliament, and pro- rogues[ prorogues]them in an unparliamentary manner.4:464. see index

  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor burnet in effigy at Philadelphia4:497.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor the planner of the Bos- ton[ Boston]Port bill.4:Ibid.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor Sails for London.4:508.
  • Agreement of Berkshire County, not to purchase goods.4:536.

Appeal, [diamond] to the King, and Council, by Charter, when it will hold good, &c.4:467. see index

  • Auctioneer put up the Ministry to sale.4:470
  • Annapolis, in Maryland. See Town of.
  • Association of Brigader Ruggles[ Timothy Ruggles], against the Whigs.4:625.
  • King George a Shocking Character drawn of him.4:306,4:745,4:749,4:811,4:971.
  • King George what his Revenue is,4:306.
  • King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament], when he prorogued it.4:351.

King George Speech, substance of.4:472 see index

  • King George his Message to the Parliament, on account of the disorders in America, particularly Boston, on Account of the east India Company 's Tea.4:495.
  • King George his Speech to the Parlia- ment[ Parliament], after passing the American Bills for altering the Constitution of the Massachusetts Bay, &c.4:553.
  • Petition from the Weavers to the King, shewing[ showing]their distressed condit- ion[ condition], chiefly owing to the contest with ye[ the]Colonies.4:316.
  • Petition of Richard Clarke, and others, Tea Consignees, to the Governor &c,4:419.
  • Petition of the Represent- atives[ Representatives]of the Massachusetts Bay, to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], praying him to remove Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]from the Bench.4:453.

Petition of the same body, to the King, praying him to remove Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], &c heated with con- tempt[ contempt], and dismist[ dismissed]: a particular Account of it.4:487,4:488. the substance of the petition.4:486. see index

  • Petition of the City of Lond- on[ London], to the House of Commons, against the Quebec Act.4:554.
  • Petition and Address from the same, to the King, on the same.4:555.
  • Petition to ye[ the]King, from the Conti- ental[ Continental]Congress.4:656,4:791.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their reply to the Governor Message, on his not laying before the Council, their impeach- ment of Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]: they determine that the Governor and Council are a Judi- cial[ Judicial]Court, &c,4:464.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, Lock their door, 'till[ until]they have Finished their business, & pass a resolve respecting their proceed- ings[ proceedings]relative to Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], previous to the Courts being prorogued.4:Ibid.

Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their petition to the King for the removal of Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], & dismist[ dismissed], and treated with great contempt.4:487,4:488. see index

  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their Answer to Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage]'s Speech, complain of being re- moved[ removed]to Salem, &c,4:513.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their proceedings and Resolves on a Continental Congress (choose 5 Members:) on the Port Act: recom- mend[ recommend]to the inhabitants to raise money to defrey the Charges of the Members of the Congress: and to purchase no English Goods, &c, &c,4:517,4:523.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, meet at Salem, the Governor refuses to treat with them: they resolve, and immediately turn them- selves[ themselves]into a Provincial Congress, &c,4:591.
  • King George what his Revenue is,4:306.
  • King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament], when he prorogued it.4:351.
  • King George Speech, substance of.4:472

King George his Message to the Parliament, on account of the disorders in America, particularly Boston, on Account of the east India Company 's Tea.4:495. see index

  • King George his Speech to the Parlia- ment[ Parliament], after passing the American Bills for altering the Constitution of the Massachusetts Bay, &c.4:553.
  • Act of Massachusetts Bay. Vendue Act.4:248.

Act of Massachusetts Bay. disallowed by the King.4:534. see index

  • Act of Massachusetts Bay. or Laws, granting power to Towns to hold meetings, &c.4:264.
  • Act of Massachusetts Bay. or Laws passed by the General Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay ; amongst which are the Tax Act, which taxes the Commissioners as usual: New Vendue Act: Lamp Act, &c.4:318
  • Act of Massachusetts Bay. against retailers, selling misct liquors.4:616
  • [no preceding index entries]

King of France, his Death, and Character.4:538. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Act of Parliament, said to be a Brutal Act, and was planned by Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], here, and the Cabal.4:497.
  • Act of Parliament, Comments on it.4:501,4:502.
  • Act of Parliament, to suppress Riots, and to regulate the Government of the Massachusetts Bay : appoint a Council from England, &c.4:509,4:510,4:532.

Act of Parliament, the King Assents to it.4:546. see index

  • Act of Parliament, called the declaratory Act.4:524.
  • Act of Parliament, a Burlesque one, on the proceed- ings of Parliament relative to America.4:529.
  • Act of Parliament, for providing quarters for Troops in America, called the Billeting Act.4:549.
  • Council of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their message to the Governor, acquaint him that Articles of charge against Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]had been sent up by the House to them.4:463.
  • Council of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their message to the Governor blame him for not laying before the board the impeachment of Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]: insinuate that by Charter they have a right to Try him: and define the power of the board by char- ter[ charter]to set as a Judicial Court, &c, with, or without the Governor.4:463.
  • Council of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their address to Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage], in Answer to his Speech at the opening the General Court, wherein they find fault with Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard]& Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson]'s administrato. and give offence to Gage[ Thomas Gage].4:516.

Council of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, new, appointed by the King. A List of those who were sworn, &c. [diamond]4:549,4:554. see index

  • Council, or House of Lords, may originate most Acts, as well as the House of Representatives, or Commons.4:1074.
  • Council of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, with the Governor, is a Judicial Court, and may remove officers, &c, whether the Governor consent or not.4:463.
  • Councellor Oliver[ Andrew Oliver ], and others, resign; a list of them.4:561,4:563,4:566,4:571.
  • King George his Speech to the Par- liament[ Parliament], when he prorogued it.4:351.
  • King George Speech, substance of.4:472
  • King George his Message to the Parliament, on account of the disorders in America, particularly Boston, on Account of the east India Company 's Tea.4:495.

King George his Speech to the Parlia- ment[ Parliament], after passing the American Bills for altering the Constitution of the Massachusetts Bay, &c.4:553. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • London city of: their proceed- ings[ proceedings], when Mr. Townsend[ James Townsend]was chosen[ Lord]Mayor.4:205.
  • London their address, Petition, &c, to the King on their Grievances.4:283.
  • London their proceedings, when Mr. Bull[ Frederick Bull]was chosen[ Lord]Mayor.4:408.

London wait upon the King by the Lord Mayor, &c, to present a Petition against the Quebec Bill, which he will not receive.4:553,4:555. see index

  • London their proceedings in choos- ing[ choosing]a Lord Mayor, &c,4:615.
  • London their Proceedings, when Mr. Wilkes[ John Wilkes]was chosen[ Lord]Mayor.4:623.
  • London Address the King, in behalf of America.4:742.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Address of the City of London, to the King, against the Quebec Act.4:555. see index

  • Address of the Selectmen of Boston, to Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage], on his Fortifying the Neck.4:571.
  • Address of the County of Suffolk, to Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage], on the same subject.4:577.
  • Address Another.4:Ibid.
  • [no preceding index entries]

King George, his re- ply[ reply]to the City of London 's address against the Quebec Bill.4:555. see index

  • King George, Issues a Proclamation, prohibiting the exploration of warlike stores.4:642.
  • King George, his Speech to the new Parliament: chiefly on Ameri- can[ American]affairs, very high!4:659.
  • King George, Lord Noth acknowledged that he made it.4:663.
  • Petition of the Represent- atives[ Representatives]of the Massachusetts Bay, to Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], praying him to remove Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver]from the Bench.4:453.
  • Petition of the same body, to the King, praying him to remove Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], &c heated with con- tempt[ contempt], and dismist[ dismissed]: a particular Account of it.4:487,4:488. the substance of the petition.4:486.
  • Petition of the City of Lond- on[ London], to the House of Commons, against the Quebec Act.4:554.

Petition and Address from the same, to the King, on the same.4:555. see index

  • Petition to ye[ the]King, from the Conti- ental[ Continental]Congress.4:656,4:791.
  • Petition the King wont[ will not]receive it.4:843.
  • Petition from the Counties of Hampshire, and Berkshire, to the Provincial Congress, for Arms, &c, for the Poor, &c,4:665.
  • Proclamation one, Issued by Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], requiring the inhabitants of Boston &c, in Town meeting to disperse, &c.4:407.
  • Proclamation by Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage], against the Solemn leauge league, and convenant.4:525.
  • Proclamation of Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage], for the encouragement of piety, &c.4:539.

Proclamation of Kings in favor of the Canadians.4:579. see index

  • Proclamation of Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage], discharging the members of the General Assembly's attendance, &c.4:588.
  • Proclamation of Governor Gages[ Thomas Gage]'s, a burlesque.4:612.
  • Proclamation of Ditto, against the Massachusetts Provincial Congress.4:614.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for, of the Massachusetts Bay return home.4:611.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for another, cho- sen[ chosen]by the Colony of Connecticut.4:620.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for another, cho- sen[ chosen]by Massachusetts Bay.4:627.

Congress Continent- al[ Continental], their proceedings relative to sending their Petition &c. to the King.4:624 see index

  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], their Letter to the Ame- rican[ American]Agents, and to those Colonies who did not send Members before.4:624.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for another, cho- sen[ chosen]by the Province of Pennsylvania.4:641.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for another, cho- sen[ chosen]by the Colony of Rhode Island.4:634.
  • Pownal[ Thomas Pownall]Governor, his opinion of the Merchants non import- ation[ importation]agreement.4:526.
  • Pownal[ Thomas Pownall]Governor his Character.4:655.
  • Powder Belonging to the Province, seized by General Gage[ Thomas Gage], which occasions the County of Middlesex to rise. &c,4:563.

Powder and Guns, and all sorts of Ammunition, prohibited by the King's being sent to America.4:629,4:642. See under Gun Powder. see index

  • Provincial Congress of the Massachusetts Bay, See Congress Provincial, &c.
  • Plymouth County meets by their Deputies, on the grievances of America, &c, resolve, &c,4:591,4:605.
  • Preston, See Town of.
  • King George, his re- ply[ reply]to the City of London 's address against the Quebec Bill.4:555.

King George, Issues a Proclamation, prohibiting the exploration of warlike stores.4:642. see index

  • King George, his Speech to the new Parliament: chiefly on Ameri- can[ American]affairs, very high!4:659.
  • King George, Lord Noth acknowledged that he made it.4:663.
  • King George, his Answer to the address of both Houses against America : & his message, say's he will inforce the American Acts.4:706.
  • Proclamation of Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage], discharging the members of the General Assembly's attendance, &c.4:588.
  • Proclamation of Governor Gages[ Thomas Gage]'s, a burlesque.4:612.
  • Proclamation of Ditto, against the Massachusetts Provincial Congress.4:614.

Proclamation Or order of the King, prohibiting the exportation of Warlike stores, &c.4:642. see index

  • Proclamation Issued by Governor Went- worth[ Sir John Wentworth], against those who removed Powder, and Guns from the Forts.4:645.
  • Proclamation or Recommendation of the Provincial Congress of the Massachusetts Bay, for a Fast.4:682.
  • Proclamation of Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage]'s against, Rebellion, &c.4:750.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for another, cho- sen[ chosen]by the Province of Pennsylvania.4:641.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for another, cho- sen[ chosen]by the Colony of Rhode Island.4:634.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for another, cho- sen[ chosen]by the Province of Maryland.4:646.

Congress Continent- al[ Continental], their Petition to the King.4:656. see index

  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], the first Continental one, a free Representation of America : the Characters of those who composed it, &c.4:660.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for another chosen by the Province of New Jersey.4:664.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for another, chosen by the Province of Newhamp- shire[ New Hampshire].4:680.
  • Petition of the same body, to the King, praying him to remove Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], &c heated with con- tempt[ contempt], and dismist[ dismissed]: a particular Account of it.4:487,4:488. the substance of the petition.4:486.
  • Petition of the City of Lond- on[ London], to the House of Commons, against the Quebec Act.4:554.
  • Petition and Address from the same, to the King, on the same.4:555.

Petition to ye[ the]King, from the Conti- ental[ Continental]Congress.4:656,4:791. see index

  • Petition the King wont[ will not]receive it.4:843.
  • Petition from the Counties of Hampshire, and Berkshire, to the Provincial Congress, for Arms, &c, for the Poor, &c,4:665.
  • Address of the Provincial Congress to the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, to the Inhabitants.4:628.
  • Address of the same Body, to the Mi nisters[ Ministers]of the Gospel, desiring them to influence their People to abide by the doings of the Con- tinental[ Continental]Congress, &c4:642.
  • Address From Nov. Anglus[ Novanglus] [ John Adams], in answer to Massachu'tensis[ Daniel Leonard], shewing[ showing]the grievances of A- merica[ America]: who were the Authors of it, &c, &c4:651,4:655,4:660,4:664,4:669,4:673,4:685,4:691,4:699,4:805,4:709,4:713.

Address of the Lords, and Commons, to the King, in answer to his Speech on opening the new Parliament: speak in very high terms, against the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, &c,4:659. see index

  • Address of the Province of New- hampshire[ New Hampshire], to their Brethren on American Grievances, &c,4:680.
  • Address of the Selectmen of several Towns, to Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage], relative to his sending Troops to Marshfield.4:682.
  • Address of the Provincial Congress of the Massachusetts Bay, to the inhabitants, on the present posture of Affairs.4:683.
  • King George, his re- ply[ reply]to the City of London 's address against the Quebec Bill.4:555.
  • King George, Issues a Proclamation, prohibiting the exploration of warlike stores.4:642.

King George, his Speech to the new Parliament: chiefly on Ameri- can[ American]affairs, very high!4:659. see index

  • King George, Lord Noth acknowledged that he made it.4:663.
  • King George, his Answer to the address of both Houses against America : & his message, say's he will inforce the American Acts.4:706.
  • King George, his answer to the address of the City of London : is astonished that they abet the Rebel- lion[ Rebellion]of the Colonies.4:742.
  • Lexington, See Town of.
  • Lynn, see Town of.
  • Lords Hosue of, a protest in it, against passing the Acts for al- tering[ altering]the Constitution of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, &c, &c.4:529,4:552,4:718.

Lords House of, protest against the answer to the Kings Speech, &c,4:659. see index

  • Lords House of, debates in, respecting the opposition of the Americans, &c,4:710.
  • Lords House of, debates in it, on American affairs.4:875.
  • Lords House of, put questions to Governor Penn[ William Penn]: some Lords propose the Petition of the Congress, as a foundation to begin a Treaty on.4:900.
  • Protest against the Boston Committee of Correspondence, &c,4:523.
  • Protest of the Lords, against the Massachusetts Riot Act: and the Act altering the Constitution of the Province.4:529.
  • Protest of the same, against the Act, for the more impartial administration of Justice in the Province of Massachusetts Bay.4:552.

Protest of the same, against the Answer to the Kings Speech, on American affairs, &c,4:659. see index

  • Protest of the same, against the measures relative to the Massachusetts Bay.4:718.
  • King George, his re- ply[ reply]to the City of London 's address against the Quebec Bill.4:555.
  • King George, Issues a Proclamation, prohibiting the exploration of warlike stores.4:642.
  • King George, his Speech to the new Parliament: chiefly on Ameri- can[ American]affairs, very high!4:659.

King George, Lord Noth acknowledged that he made it.4:663. see index

  • King George, his Answer to the address of both Houses against America : & his message, say's he will inforce the American Acts.4:706.
  • King George, his answer to the address of the City of London : is astonished that they abet the Rebel- lion[ Rebellion]of the Colonies.4:742.
  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament, after the commence- ment[ commencement]of hostilities in America, &c,4:773.
  • Impeachment against Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver].4:458,4:459.
  • Impeachment how to be carried on, &c,4:463,4:483.
  • Importation non, See under Non

Jamacia Island of, their House of Representatives present a Me- morial[ Memorial]to the King on the Grievances of America ; pray for a repeal of the Acts,&c,4:693,4:694. see index

  • Johnstone Governor his excellent speech in favor of America.4:729.
  • Johnstone Governor his Speech in favor of America, and against Governor Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson],4:991.
  • Johnstone Governor his Speech, wherein he shews[ shows], that any Fort well managed, will with even a single Gun, dislodge any Man of War, or burn her.4:999.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Petition of the Represent- atives[ Representatives]of the Island of Jamaica, to the King, against the American Acts, &c,4:693,4:694. see index

  • Petition of the city of London, to the King, relative to the American War.4:878
  • Petition of the city of Cork, to the King, in behalf of America, &c,4:1022. See addresses, &c.
  • Princess Dowager of Wales[ Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg], her Death, an Account of her Issue, &c,4:58her character, Funeral, &c, &c, &c,4:58.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], the first Continental one, a free Representation of America : the Characters of those who composed it, &c.4:660.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for another chosen by the Province of New Jersey.4:664.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for another, chosen by the Province of Newhamp- shire[ New Hampshire].4:680.

Congress Continent- al[ Continental], their Proceedings much admired in England : their petition received by the King, who promises to lay it before the Parliament &c. 669.4:696. see index

  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for another chosen by the Province of Georgia.4:707.
  • Congress Continent- al[ Continental], members for another, cho- sen[ chosen]by the Representatives of the low- wer[ lower]counties, in Pennsylvania.4:708.
  • Letter to Gen'ral[ General]Ruggles[ Timothy Ruggles], in reply to his Letter prefixed to his Association.4:644.
  • Letter from the Town of Chelsea to the Boston Committee of Correspondence4:654.
  • Letter from General Lee, to Lord Peircy, respecting the contest between Great Britain and the Colonnnie Colonies.4:684.

Letter from the Agent's to the Speaker of the Pennsylvania House of Assembly, informs him, that the King has graciously received the petition of the Continental Congress.4:700. see index

  • Letter circular one of Lord Dartmouth, to the Governors, to prevent a Continental Congress.4:700.
  • Pennsylvania for the lower Counties, do.4:553.
  • Pennsylvania approve what the Con- tinental[ Continental]Congress did.4:636.
  • Pennsylvania choose Members for a new Continental Congress, &c,4:641.

Pennsylvania their proceedings, and answer to the Governor Speech, wont[ will not]address the King, as the Congress did it before. &c.4:700. see index

  • Pennsylvania for the lower Counties, adopt the proceedings of the Continent- al[ Continental]Congress: choose Delegates for a New Congress.4:708.
  • King George, Issues a Proclamation, prohibiting the exploration of warlike stores.4:642.
  • King George, his Speech to the new Parliament: chiefly on Ameri- can[ American]affairs, very high!4:659.
  • King George, Lord Noth acknowledged that he made it.4:663.

King George, his Answer to the address of both Houses against America : & his message, say's he will inforce the American Acts.4:706. see index

  • King George, his answer to the address of the City of London : is astonished that they abet the Rebel- lion[ Rebellion]of the Colonies.4:742.
  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament, after the commence- ment[ commencement]of hostilities in America, &c,4:773.
  • King George, his Answer to the Petition of the City of London.4:808.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Address of the Lords, and Commons, to the King: say the Massachusetts Bay is in a state of Rebellion: urge for coervice measure, &c,4:710. see index

  • Address of the Representatives of North Carolina in answer to Governor Martin[ Josiah Martin]'s Speech; approve of the Congress, &c,4:733.
  • Address of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress, to the inhabitants of Great Britain, on the commencement of hostilities.4:738.
  • Address to the inhabitants of the Massachusetts Bay, desiring them to lend money.4:741.
  • Chelsea, See Town of.
  • Colden[ Cadwallader Colden], Governor, his Speech to the General Assembly of New York, on the dis- orders[ disorders]of America, hints a dislike of the mode of proceeding by a Congress, &c,4:662.
  • Common Law defined.4:691.

Crisis, an excellent paper published in England, against the King, and ministry,4:740,4:745,4:749,4:755,4:759,4:811. see index

  • Camden Lord[ Charles Pratt], his Speech against committing the Fish, or restraining Bill.4:736.
  • Crown Point, taken by the Americans.4:743.
  • Common Sense, an excellent pamphlet; an extract from it, shewing[ showing]that the Colonies must be independent, &c,4:907.
  • Address of the Representatives of North Carolina in answer to Governor Martin[ Josiah Martin]'s Speech; approve of the Congress, &c,4:733.
  • Address of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress, to the inhabitants of Great Britain, on the commencement of hostilities.4:738.
  • Address to the inhabitants of the Massachusetts Bay, desiring them to lend money.4:741.

Address From the City of London, to the King, in behalf of America.4:742. see index

  • Address From Crises, (the author of,) to the King.4:749.
  • Address of the Continental Congress, to the Inhabitants of Canada, on the taking of Tieconderago[ Ticonderoga ], &c,4:756.
  • Address of the Provincial Congress of New York, to General Washington[ George Washington], on his appointment as General.4:760.
  • King George, his Speech to the new Parliament: chiefly on Ameri- can[ American]affairs, very high!4:659.
  • King George, Lord Noth acknowledged that he made it.4:663.
  • King George, his Answer to the address of both Houses against America : & his message, say's he will inforce the American Acts.4:706.

King George, his answer to the address of the City of London : is astonished that they abet the Rebel- lion[ Rebellion]of the Colonies.4:742. see index

  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament, after the commence- ment[ commencement]of hostilities in America, &c,4:773.
  • King George, his Answer to the Petition of the City of London.4:808.
  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament on the American Re- bellion[ Rebellion], &c,4:867.
  • London wait upon the King by the Lord Mayor, &c, to present a Petition against the Quebec Bill, which he will not receive.4:553,4:555.
  • London their proceedings in choos- ing[ choosing]a Lord Mayor, &c,4:615.
  • London their Proceedings, when Mr. Wilkes[ John Wilkes]was chosen[ Lord]Mayor.4:623.

London Address the King, in behalf of America.4:742. see index

  • London their proceedings relative to petitioning the King, Resolves, &c, respecting his re- fusing[ refusing]to receive it on the Throne, &c,4:800.
  • London their address to the Electors, on American Affairs.4:857.
  • London their address tot he King, on behalf of America.4:956.
  • Address of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress, to the inhabitants of Great Britain, on the commencement of hostilities.4:738.
  • Address to the inhabitants of the Massachusetts Bay, desiring them to lend money.4:741.
  • Address From the City of London, to the King, in behalf of America.4:742.

Address From Crises, (the author of,) to the King.4:749. see index

  • Address of the Continental Congress, to the Inhabitants of Canada, on the taking of Tieconderago[ Ticonderoga ], &c,4:756.
  • Address of the Provincial Congress of New York, to General Washington[ George Washington], on his appointment as General.4:760.
  • Address of the Provincial Congress of the Massachusetts Bay, to[ General]Washington[ Washington], and Lee[ Charles Lee], on their being appointed Generals.4:761.
  • King George, Lord Noth acknowledged that he made it.4:663.
  • King George, his Answer to the address of both Houses against America : & his message, say's he will inforce the American Acts.4:706.
  • King George, his answer to the address of the City of London : is astonished that they abet the Rebel- lion[ Rebellion]of the Colonies.4:742.

King George, his Speech to the Parliament, after the commence- ment[ commencement]of hostilities in America, &c,4:773. see index

  • King George, his Answer to the Petition of the City of London.4:808.
  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament on the American Re- bellion[ Rebellion], &c,4:867.
  • King George, his Answer to the Commons address,4:882.
  • London their proceedings in choos- ing[ choosing]a Lord Mayor, &c,4:615.
  • London their Proceedings, when Mr. Wilkes[ John Wilkes]was chosen[ Lord]Mayor.4:623.
  • London Address the King, in behalf of America.4:742.

London their proceedings relative to petitioning the King, Resolves, &c, respecting his re- fusing[ refusing]to receive it on the Throne, &c,4:800. see index

  • London their address to the Electors, on American Affairs.4:857.
  • London their address tot he King, on behalf of America.4:956.
  • London Grown corrupt, & slavish.4:1054.
  • Address of the Provincial Congress of South Carolina, to Lord Campbel[ William Campbell], & his An- swer[ Answer].4:768.
  • Address of the Continental Congress, to the inhabitants of Great Britain, on the Ameri- cans[ Americans]taking arms, &c.4:775.
  • Address From the same, to the People of Ireland, on the commencement of hostili ties[ hostilities]in america[ America], &c,4:787.

Address Petition, &c, of the City of London, to the King, relative to the civil War in America, &c.4:803. see index

  • Address From General Washington[ George Washington], to the inhabitants of Canada, by General Arnolds[ Benedict Arnold], when he marched there.4:807.
  • King George, his Answer to the address of both Houses against America : & his message, say's he will inforce the American Acts.4:706.
  • King George, his answer to the address of the City of London : is astonished that they abet the Rebel- lion[ Rebellion]of the Colonies.4:742.
  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament, after the commence- ment[ commencement]of hostilities in America, &c,4:773.

King George, his Answer to the Petition of the City of London.4:808. see index

  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament on the American Re- bellion[ Rebellion], &c,4:867.
  • King George, his Answer to the Commons address,4:882.
  • King George, his Answer to the address of City of London : tells them, that he will pursue the most proba- ble[ probable]measures, &c.4:956.
  • Address of the principal inhabitants of Boston, to Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage], on his departure to Great Britain.4:827.
  • Address of the Mandamus Council, to the same, on the same.4:Ibid.
  • Address of the Refugee Tories, to the same, on the same.4:Ibid.

Address of the Delegates of Georgia, to the King, on the distresses of America.4:832. see index

  • Address From the General Officers to the Continental Army at Cambridge.4:843.
  • Address From the City of London, to the Electors of Great Britain, on the af- fairs[ affairs]of America, &c.4:857.
  • Address of the House of Commons, to the King; promise to support him in sub- duing[ subduing]America.4:882.
  • Georgia, Inhabitants of: meet, resolve similar to the rest of America ; but send me no Delegates to Congress.4:580.
  • Georgia, join the Continent, in opposition tot he oppressions of America.4:645.
  • Georgia, meet in Provincial Congress, adopt what the Continental Congress did, with some variation: choose Delegates to meet in Congress, &c.4:707.

Georgia, by their Delegates, address the King in behalf of America.4:832. see index

  • Georgia, transactions of the inhabitants there, in behalf of Liberty, and in their defence: en- gagement[ engagement]there. &c.4:927.
  • Georgia, Congress of, their address to President Bullock[ Archibald Bulloch].4:999. See State of Georgia.
  • Gordon William reverend Installed.4:113.
  • Proclamation of Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage]'s against, Rebellion, &c.4:750.
  • Proclamation of Governor Howe[ William Howe], a- gainst against carrying Money from Boston : to form an Association, &c,4:829.
  • Proclamation of Governor Carleton[ Guy Carleton], declaring Martial Law, &c, in Que- bec[ Quebec].4:834,4:873.

Proclamation of the King, declaring the Americans Rebels.4:840. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], resolve to make money: lay a Plan to call it in.4:837.
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], resolve to have a just, and well authenticated Account of the Hostilities commit- ted[ committed]by the British Troops, &c.4:839.

Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], notify that the King will not receive their Petition of the Congress.4:843. see index

  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], Appoint Gentlman to repair to Canada, to form an Army.4:851.
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], their remarks on the King's Proclamation.4:859.
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], new Members chosen by the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay.4:863.
  • Petition of the City of Lond- on[ London], to the House of Commons, against the Quebec Act.4:554.
  • Petition and Address from the same, to the King, on the same.4:555.
  • Petition to ye[ the]King, from the Conti- ental[ Continental]Congress.4:656,4:791.

Petition the King wont[ will not]receive it.4:843. see index

  • Petition from the Counties of Hampshire, and Berkshire, to the Provincial Congress, for Arms, &c, for the Poor, &c,4:665.
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], resolve to have a just, and well authenticated Account of the Hostilities commit- ted[ committed]by the British Troops, &c.4:839.
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], notify that the King will not receive their Petition of the Congress.4:843.
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], Appoint Gentlman to repair to Canada, to form an Army.4:851.

Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], their remarks on the King's Proclamation.4:859. see index

  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], new Members chosen by the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay.4:863.
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], Establish they pay of Officers, and appoint the General Officers in the Continental Army and publish General Washington[ George Washington]s Commis- sion[ Commission]. 869.
  • Continental, say Congress Continent- al[ Continental], Establish an Hospital, with the Officers pay.4:874.
  • King George, his answer to the address of the City of London : is astonished that they abet the Rebel- lion[ Rebellion]of the Colonies.4:742.
  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament, after the commence- ment[ commencement]of hostilities in America, &c,4:773.
  • King George, his Answer to the Petition of the City of London.4:808.

King George, his Speech to the Parliament on the American Re- bellion[ Rebellion], &c,4:867. see index

  • King George, his Answer to the Commons address,4:882.
  • King George, his Answer to the address of City of London : tells them, that he will pursue the most proba- ble[ probable]measures, &c.4:956.
  • King George, forbid to be prayed for by the Convention of Maryland.4:960. by the Convention of Virginia.4:981. by the Assembly of Rhode Island.4:986.
  • Petition of the Represent- atives[ Representatives]of the Island of Jamaica, to the King, against the American Acts, &c,4:693,4:694.

Petition of the city of London, to the King, relative to the American War.4:878 see index

  • Petition of the city of Cork, to the King, in behalf of America, &c,4:1022. See addresses, &c.
  • Princess Dowager of Wales[ Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg], her Death, an Account of her Issue, &c,4:58her character, Funeral, &c, &c, &c,4:58.
  • Protest, against the result of Council, respecting the reverend Mr. Emerson.4:139.
  • Address of the Delegates of Georgia, to the King, on the distresses of America.4:832.
  • Address From the General Officers to the Continental Army at Cambridge.4:843.
  • Address From the City of London, to the Electors of Great Britain, on the af- fairs[ affairs]of America, &c.4:857.

Address of the House of Commons, to the King; promise to support him in sub- duing[ subduing]America.4:882. see index

  • Address From the Author of Com- mon[ Common]sense, to the Quakers.4:911.
  • Address of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, to General Washington[ George Washington], on the Town of Boston 's being evacuated by the British Troops.4:912.
  • Address of the Selectmen of the Town of Boston, to the same, on the same.4:913.
  • Commons House of in England, debates in, it respecting the Massa- chusetts[ Massachusetts ]bay in particular, and America in general, &c.4:663,4:706,4:710,4:714.
  • Commons House of in England, debates in it, respecting America, and the Friendly terms offered by Lord Chatham, &c4:741.
  • Commons House of in England, debates in it, on American affairs.4:875,4:877,4:881,4:882.

Commons House of in England, their address to the King; promise to support him in subduing the Colonies.4:882. see index

  • Commons House of in England, debates in it, on the American war, and hiring Foreign Troops, &c.4:947.
  • Church, and Congegration, meet- ing[ meeting]in Brattle Street, vote to build a new Church.4:29.
  • Church, and Congegration, Demolish the old one.4:81.
  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament, after the commence- ment[ commencement]of hostilities in America, &c,4:773.
  • King George, his Answer to the Petition of the City of London.4:808.
  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament on the American Re- bellion[ Rebellion], &c,4:867.

King George, his Answer to the Commons address,4:882. see index

  • King George, his Answer to the address of City of London : tells them, that he will pursue the most proba- ble[ probable]measures, &c.4:956.
  • King George, forbid to be prayed for by the Convention of Maryland.4:960. by the Convention of Virginia.4:981. by the Assembly of Rhode Island.4:986.
  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament, stills hopes that, the American Rebels will be brought to a sense of their duty.4:992.
  • [no preceding index entries]

Congress, many an one held in in Britain, who have deposed Kings, and Set up others, &c.4:889. see index

  • Congress Provincial, of the Massachusetts bay formed, and adjourned to Concord.4:591.4:595.
  • Congress Provincial, their message to Governor Gage[ Thomas Gage], on his hostile preparations on the Neck, &c.4:595.
  • Congress Provincial, resolve that no mo- ney[ money]be paid the Province Treasurer, &c,4:Ibid.
  • Resolves that no Military Officer, extort, &c, an Oath from any Person.4:909.
  • Resolves to allow a Free Trade.4:925.
  • Resolves respecting Tea, & what price it ought to be sold for, &c,4:928.

Resolves to take all Vessels, &c, belonging to the subjects of the King of Great Britain, &c,4:930. see index

  • Resolves to give Letters of Marque: and instructions given to Masters of Vessels.4:935.
  • Resolves that the Colonies ought to adopt new Forms of Govern- ment[ Government], and renounce Allegiance to George, 3d.4:945.
  • Resolves relative to the Treatment of Captives, &c.4:959.
  • Act of Massachusetts Bay. Against Treason.4:1063.
  • Act of Massachusetts Bay. against crimes, below Trea- son[ Treason]. [tube]4:1065.
  • Act of the Assembly of Rhode Island, to form their Militia, &c.4:634

Act of the Assembly of Rhode Island, Repealing an Act, securing Allegiance to the King: enact that his name shall not be used in any process, &c.4:939. see index

  • Act, or Law of the Town of Boston, against driving too fast in ye[ the]Streets, &c,4:644.
  • Acts for the regulation of Trade, always submitted to by America.4:667.4:685.4:1228
  • Act of Parliament relative to the calling Town meetings, &c. submitted to, by the Town of Marshfield, and is the first instance of submitting to it in any shape.4:689.
  • Rhode Island (a) remove Guns from ye[ the]Forts, &c.4:632.
  • Rhode Island House of Re- presentatives[ Representatives], adpot the measures recommended by the Virginia House: choose a Committee of Correspondence.4:290.
  • Rhode Island passa Militia Act: vote Members for a Continental Congress did; vote to purchase a large quantity of Ammunition.4:634.

Rhode Island pass an Act; renouncing the Kings Name in all Processes, &c,4:939. see index

  • Rhode Island their proceedings, and Resolves respecting the Boston Port Act: &c vote, and choose members for a Congress, &c,4:517. See State of Rhode Island.
  • Resolve's of the Representative of the Massachusetts Bay, on Governor Hut- chinson[ Hutchinson]'s Independancy, resolve by his being independant, that he is not a Governor agreable[ agreeable]to the Charter, &c, &c.4:112.
  • Resolve's against the declaratory Act, and the Judges taking their pay from the King: say if they take it, they are ene- mies[ enemies]to their Country, &c, &c.4:251.
  • Address From the Author of Com- mon[ Common]sense, to the Quakers.4:911.
  • Address of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, to General Washington[ George Washington], on the Town of Boston 's being evacuated by the British Troops.4:912.
  • Address of the Selectmen of the Town of Boston, to the same, on the same.4:913.

Address of the city of Belfast to the King: beg he would be reconciled to the Colonies, &c.4:945. see index

  • Address Petition, &c, to the King, from the city of London, in behalf of America.4:956.
  • Address proposed in the House of Lords, to the King, on the shameful contract made with the German Princes for Troops, &c,4:960.
  • Address of the Congress of Georgia, in answer to President Bullocks[ Archibald Bulloch]Speech.4:999.
  • Tieconderago[ Ticonderoga ]Stores taken there.4:739.
  • Tories, and Crown point, thoughts of taking it laid aside by the English Troops, who retire.4:1041,4:1056.
  • Test, framed by the Great Assembly of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay.4:949.

Treaty between King George, & Duke of Brunswick realative to sending troops to America.4:951. see index

  • Treaty with France.4:1018, &c.
  • Address of the Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay, to General Washington[ George Washington], on the Town of Boston 's being evacuated by the British Troops.4:912.
  • Address of the Selectmen of the Town of Boston, to the same, on the same.4:913.
  • Address of the city of Belfast to the King: beg he would be reconciled to the Colonies, &c.4:945.

Address Petition, &c, to the King, from the city of London, in behalf of America.4:956. see index

  • Address proposed in the House of Lords, to the King, on the shameful contract made with the German Princes for Troops, &c,4:960.
  • Address of the Congress of Georgia, in answer to President Bullocks[ Archibald Bulloch]Speech.4:999.
  • Address From the Continental Con- gress[ Congress], to the People of Great Britain.4:1204.
  • King George, his Answer to the Petition of the City of London.4:808.
  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament on the American Re- bellion[ Rebellion], &c,4:867.
  • King George, his Answer to the Commons address,4:882.

King George, his Answer to the address of City of London : tells them, that he will pursue the most proba- ble[ probable]measures, &c.4:956. see index

  • King George, forbid to be prayed for by the Convention of Maryland.4:960. by the Convention of Virginia.4:981. by the Assembly of Rhode Island.4:986.
  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament, stills hopes that, the American Rebels will be brought to a sense of their duty.4:992.
  • London Address the King, in behalf of America.4:742.
  • London their proceedings relative to petitioning the King, Resolves, &c, respecting his re- fusing[ refusing]to receive it on the Throne, &c,4:800.
  • London their address to the Electors, on American Affairs.4:857.

London their address tot he King, on behalf of America.4:956. see index

  • London Grown corrupt, & slavish.4:1054.
  • Lunenburg, see Town of
  • Lancaster, See Town of.
  • Address of the Selectmen of the Town of Boston, to the same, on the same.4:913.
  • Address of the city of Belfast to the King: beg he would be reconciled to the Colonies, &c.4:945.
  • Address Petition, &c, to the King, from the city of London, in behalf of America.4:956.

Address proposed in the House of Lords, to the King, on the shameful contract made with the German Princes for Troops, &c,4:960. see index

  • Address of the Congress of Georgia, in answer to President Bullocks[ Archibald Bulloch]Speech.4:999.
  • Address From the Continental Con- gress[ Congress], to the People of Great Britain.4:1204.
  • Address from the same, to the Inhabitants of the Colonies [diamond].4:1213.
  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament on the American Re- bellion[ Rebellion], &c,4:867.
  • King George, his Answer to the Commons address,4:882.
  • King George, his Answer to the address of City of London : tells them, that he will pursue the most proba- ble[ probable]measures, &c.4:956.

King George, forbid to be prayed for by the Convention of Maryland.4:960. by the Convention of Virginia.4:981. by the Assembly of Rhode Island.4:986. see index

  • King George, his Speech to the Parliament, stills hopes that, the American Rebels will be brought to a sense of their duty.4:992.
  • Lords House of, put questions to Governor Penn[ William Penn]: some Lords propose the Petition of the Congress, as a foundation to begin a Treaty on.4:900.
  • Lords House of, protest in it, against the prohibition of commerce, one Colony with another: say it will drive them to independancy.4:931.
  • Lords House of, debates in it, on American affairs.4:956.

Lords House of, a proposal made in it, to address the King on the shameful Cont- ract[ Contract]with the German Princes, &c,4:960. see index

  • Langdon Doctor chosen President of Harvard College.4:537. Installed.4:600.
  • Lee[ Charles Lee]General, an anecdote concerning him.4:622.
  • Lee[ Charles Lee]General arrives at Philadelphia.4:739.
  • Resolves of the Represent- atives[ Representatives]of the Province of Mary- land[ Maryland]: choose Members for a Continent- al[ Continental]Congress.4:531.
  • Resolves choose Members for a new Continental Congress, &c,4:646.

Resolves resolve, that King George shall not be prayed for,4:960,4:981. see index

  • Resolves of the Represent- atives[ Representatives]of the Province of Penn- sylvania[ Pennsylvania], on the Grievances of America.4:544.
  • Resolves to adapt the Resolves of the Continental Congress: to en- courage[ encourage]Manufactures, &c.4:684.
  • Resolves that they are willing the Continental Congress should declare independancy* vid. below.4:968.
  • Resolves to encourage the Making of Flints: and respecting the Marching the Militia of Pennsylvania, & the Jersey 's, &c.4:976.
  • Resolves that they approve of General Washington[ George Washington]s behaviour[ behavior], respect- ing[ respecting]his negociation with Lord Howe[ William Howe].4:982.
  • Resolves disapprove of the Cartel settled by General Arnold[ Benedict Arnold]: are unwilling to abide by it, unless, &c.4:985.

Resolves that Paper Makers be detained: that an exchange be made for Colonel Allen[ Ethan Allen]: and to take all pro- perty[ property]on the Sea, belonging to any sub- ject[ subject]of King George, except Burmudas, and new Providence.4:985. see index

  • Resolves to give encouragement to the Army, and (Army say) Navy, in case any of them are wounded, &c,4:1007.
  • Resolves respecting Post riders, &c.4:1011.
  • Resolves to raise a New Army: proportion it to the different States: propose Land to be given to the Officers, and Soldiers.4:1017.
  • State of South Carolina adopt a New Government.4:947.
  • State of Virginia, adopt a new Form of Government.4:979.
  • State of Rhode Is- land[ Island]Assembly, approve of the declaration of independancy.4:981.

State of Rhode Is- land[ Island]enact, that the King shall not be payed for.4:986. see index

  • State of New Jersey adopt a New Form of Goverment.4:983.
  • State of New Jersey proceedings there of the enemy, and the transactions of our Troops there.4:1053.
  • State of Pennsylvania ; declare what treason is.4:1011.
  • King George, his Answer to the Commons address,4:882.
  • King George, his Answer to the address of City of London : tells them, that he will pursue the most proba- ble[ probable]measures, &c.4:956.
  • King George, forbid to be prayed for by the Convention of Maryland.4:960. by the Convention of Virginia.4:981. by the Assembly of Rhode Island.4:986.

King George, his Speech to the Parliament, stills hopes that, the American Rebels will be brought to a sense of their duty.4:992. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Common Sense, an excellent pamphlet; an extract from it, shewing[ showing]that the Colonies must be independent, &c,4:907.
  • Campbel Col[ Colonel], his Letter to General Howe[ William Howe]on his captivity,4:971.
  • Carlton[ Sir Guy Carleton], Governor Issues a declaration that he will accept of no Flag's from Rebels, or messages, &c, and lets the prisoners go on their parole, &c,4:993.

Cork city of, a petition to the King, relative to the American War.4:1022. see index

  • Christians, their Rights.4:1094.
  • Clarendon Earl of[ Thomas Villiers], Impeach- ed[ Impeached], for introducing an arbitrary Government in the Colonies.4:1082.
  • Charles, and his two Sons, believed by almost all Americans, as worthy of the Block.4:1257.
  • Petition of the Represent- atives[ Representatives]of the Island of Jamaica, to the King, against the American Acts, &c,4:693,4:694.
  • Petition of the city of London, to the King, relative to the American War.4:878

Petition of the city of Cork, to the King, in behalf of America, &c,4:1022. See addresses, &c. see index

  • Princess Dowager of Wales[ Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg], her Death, an Account of her Issue, &c,4:58her character, Funeral, &c, &c, &c,4:58.
  • Protest, against the result of Council, respecting the reverend Mr. Emerson.4:139.
  • Protest against the proceedings of the Town of Marblehead.4:205.
  • Speech spirited one of Al- derman[ Alderman]Bull[ Frederick Bull], on the Treaties for For- eign[ Foreign]Troops to be sent to America.4:960.
  • Speech of President Bullock[ Archibald Bulloch], to the Provincial Congress of Georgia.4:996.
  • Speech his answer.4:1000.

Speech of one of the Depu- ties[ Deputies]of a Province in Holland on a Demand of the British King for Troops.4:1023. see index

  • Speech the first Speech of Governor Levingstone[ William Livingston]to the Assembly of New Jersey.4:1028.
  • Speech of Governor Barnard[ Sir Francis Bernard], extracts from, in[ favor]of the Colonies.4:1217, &c.
  • Spainards, wont[ will not]deliver up Falkland Islands, agreable[ agreeable]to Convention.4:19.
  • Spainards, deliver them up, &c.4:35.
  • Spain how she left her liberties.4:36.

Spain King of, determined to encourage a trade, with the united States of America.4:1052. see index

  • Sheriffs Wilkes[ John Wilkes], & Bull[ Frederick Bull], pass salutary orders respecting prisoners, and admittance into the Courts, &c.4:32.
  • Speech of Mr. Flood in the Irish House of Commons, against Jerry Dyson 's having a pension, &c.4:35.
  • Speech of Colonel Barry in the House of Commons against the minis- try[ ministry], &c.4:56.
  • Militia of the Town of Boston, make a grand Appearance, &c.4:151,4:156,4:302,4:366.
  • Militia in England, how cloath- ed[ clothed], and paid, &c.4:168.
  • Militia may make good Soldiers in a few Months.4:1263,4:1264.

Militia a sort of, compose part of the King of Russia's Troops: he gained most of his victories by a sort of Militia.4:1263. see index

  • Militia of America, may make the best of Soldiers to the amount of 100,000 men in a few Months.4:1264,4:1265.
  • Magna Charta, of great consequence; called the Charter of the liberties of England.4:17.
  • Molineaux William his character defended: thanked by the Town of Boston, for his Fidelity in carrying on the wool- ing[ wooling]manufactory, &c.4:45,4:46.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor censured for his conduct re- lative[ relative]to his removal of the Court to Bos- ton[ Boston].4:92,4:93,4:96,4:97,4:179.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his character as a politician.4:Ibid.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor on his independancy.4:97.

Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his reply to the message of the House about his pay from the King: acknowledges he pays him, &c,4:Ibid. see index

  • [no following entries]
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his Speech to the General Court on the opening of it at the Election.4:88.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his reply to the message of the House: tells them he will remove the Court if he can, consistent with his duty to the King, &c.4:90.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his message to the House, desires them to explain something in their message, &c,4:92.

Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his reply to the message of the House: tells them that he will not remove the Court to Boston, while they dispute the Kings Right, &c.4:Ibid. see index

  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor censured for his conduct re- lative[ relative]to his removal of the Court to Bos- ton[ Boston].4:92,4:93,4:96,4:97,4:179.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor his character as a politician.4:Ibid.
  • Hutchinson[ Thomas Hutchinson], Governor on his independancy.4:97.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, resolve on the dependancy of the Judges on the King for their pay, &c, declare they ought to be impeached, &c,4:318.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their message to the Governor because he declined to pass Bills, as the dates &c, were in English.4:321.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their reply to the Governor Speech, justify, wherein their choosing Committees of Correspondence, &c.4:449.

Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, their proceedings against Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], for taking his pay from the King.4:Ibid. see index

  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, a List of their names who voted pro, & Con.4:Ib.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, they remonstrate to the Governor, & Council, against Judge Oliver[ Andrew Oliver], for taking his pay from the King. vid the remonst- rance[ remonstrance].4:452.
  • Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, they, and the Council re- solve[ resolve]to adjourn the Superior Court, which the Governor will not assent to.4:453.

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This tool searches title information for all of the newspapers and pamphlets included in the collection, as well as additional explanatory notes about particularly complicated pages. Some descriptions of newspaper issues also include summaries of topics covered in the newspaper articles and/or specific subjects, names, and advertisements appearing on the page. This feature is currently available for 25 newspapers and will be expanded as time permits.

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