Diary of Charles Francis Adams, volume 2

Monday June 25th. CFA Monday June 25th. CFA
Monday June 25th.

I employed myself at home during the day, and as Grotius was finished, I sat down to read Coke more constantly. My occupations 140were tolerably regular. In the evening I rode with John, and afterwards played Billiards.

Tuesday. June 26th. CFA Tuesday. June 26th. CFA
Tuesday. June 26th.

Occupations much as usual, my mind is very considerably distracted in a manner which is both new and very unaccountable. I have been studying the reasons of it. In the evening Miss Roberdeau came to spend some time again. We took a ride and afterwards played billiards. A letter from Abby.

Wednesday June 27th. CFA Wednesday June 27th. CFA
Wednesday June 27th.

The round of my occupations is so very monotonous as hardly to make it worthwhile to mention them. Little or nothing distinguished this day from any of the others. I wrote to Abby in the afternoon. Evening as usual.

Thursday June 28th. CFA Thursday June 28th. CFA
Thursday June 28th.

A letter came from George today complaining of an accident which he met with and whining about his general health as an excuse for neglect of writing. This put Madame into a fit of tears and it was not till evening that I discovered she had determined to go on to Boston alone. I was not asked my opinion and did not give any although I certainly had one. Nor could I analyze my mother’s motives for her course. But I certainly felt most prodigiously provoked by George and his nonsense.1 In the evening we had a numerous Company here. It was exceedingly warm and we felt in little disposition to be agreeable. But the evening passed off and we retired in hopes Madame would change her mind.

1.

GWA’s letter is missing. In fact, he seems to have been seriously ill with an abscess (LCA to JQA, 6 July 1827, Adams Papers).

Friday June 29th. CFA Friday June 29th. CFA
Friday June 29th.

Morning occupation as usual. Madame left us today attended only by two Servants. I will not express my sentiments upon this occasion. They are sentiments of deep regret at any rate. The family were quite dull in consequence. The departure will only have the effect of spoiling a portion of the pleasure of the summer here. But I am always of opinion that there are advantages resulting from every thing and I see some in this very case.

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