Diary of Charles Francis Adams, volume 2

Saturday. 30th. CFA Saturday. 30th. CFA
Saturday. 30th.

I remained until quite late at Quincy this morning without doing much, owing to my time being wasted in waiting for my father who rode to town in my gig with me. The weather continued quite warm and our ride being thrown into the heat of the day made it fatiguing. Called at the Office. Fisher and Richardson came in and paid me visits which took the whole of the time allowable to my stay in Boston. Called at Dr. Welsh’s for my father, and carried him with me to Medford. We found assembled the family, consisting of Edward B. 275and his wife, Sidney with his, Chardon, Mr. and Mrs. Everett, Mr. Frothingham and the regular family. Mrs. F. was not able to be there owing to the production of another male animal in human shape, in other words, an infant fifth child.1 We had a pleasant day, Mrs. Everett sat next to me and was agreeable as usual. It is rather singular that those do not unite all the domestic qualities who possess the social ones in their greatest extent. The one however is acquired by habit, the other is a jewel above price. I passed the evening conversing with Abby, though in very low spirits.

1.

Mrs. Frothingham had just given birth to Ward Brooks Frothingham. See Adams Genealogy.

Sunday 31st. CFA Sunday 31st. CFA
Sunday 31st.

My low spirits still continued, not materially decreased by the circumstances that my stomach was somewhat out of order. My father also seemed much out of spirits. The weather continued as warm as ever; I went to Meeting and heard Mr. Frothingham preach. He came from Boston in the morning and went to West Cambridge in the afternoon. His style is not energetic enough, it is the weaving of a mist, signifying little, and merely obscuring the Sun. I did not go in the afternoon nor did I occupy myself usefully. My spirits have been in but poor condition since the agitation of this question about my marriage which is more enveloped in doubt and darkness. Evening, conversation with Abby and afterwards with Mr. Brooks merely on common topics.