Diary of Charles Francis Adams, volume 2

331 Sunday. 4th. CFA Sunday. 4th. CFA
Sunday. 4th.

The weather did not relax at all in the intensity of cold. I suffered very much in dressing this morning. My room happening to be very cold. Attended Meeting in the Morning at Dr. Channing’s. Heard Mr. Gannett preach a Sermon not to my taste. Rode out to Medford as usual. Did not suffer so much from the air as I anticipated, being well protected in every part excepting my hands. Found the family rather dull I thought, at this time. Abby complained of a cold and rheumatism. I passed the time much as usual. Pleasantly enough. Mr. Brooks was pleasant. I like his manner to me much better than I used to.

Monday 5th. CFA Monday 5th. CFA
Monday 5th.

Left Medford quite late this morning, anticipating a cold and disagreeable ride, and as usual not a little attracted by other causes. But I reached Boston very comfortably, the weather having moderated somewhat. The morning was occupied in making payments preparatory to an admission to the Bar. Afternoon, reading Mr. Burke’s Thoughts on French Affairs. He seems to have had his head a little turned by his apprehensions, although I admit that there was some occasion for it. Somehow or other, I caught a violent Cold which prevented my going to the Office in the Evening, so I remained at home and read aloud to the ladies of the family.

Tuesday 6th. CFA Tuesday 6th. CFA
Tuesday 6th.

Morning at the Office, and in the Court of Common Pleas. I was this day admitted to practice as An Attorney in this Court. May it be of service to me! and may my resolutions hold out to make the best of every thing that I can do. For indolence is not my wish and law business is within the reach of the most common abilities. Perseverance conquers all things. Settled my accounts with Forbes and Watson, my principal bills. My father sends me no remittance. Afternoon, Mr. Burke’s Pamphlets on French Affairs. Evening, Dr. Johnson. The weather was foggy but had moderated very much.

Wednesday. 7th. CFA Wednesday. 7th. CFA
Wednesday. 7th.

Morning at the Office. Received a letter from my Father but without a remittance. It was upon the subject of the present troubles which surround him.1 This prevented my doing much in the way of Law business this morning, or I would rather say, Law Study. De-332lightfully mild weather which is a grateful change. Afternoon, Mr. Burke still upon French Affairs. I confess myself tired of the subject. Evening, Mr. Boswell’s Life of Dr. Johnson and a portion of the Tour to the Hebrides, very amusing. Conversation at home until late upon Grammar and Pronunciation.

1.

JQA’s letter brought his son up to date with an account of the latest developments in his war against the old New England Federalists. To the “thirteen confederates” who had demanded an explanation of his charges (see entry for 15 Dec. 1828, and note, above), he replied at length on 30 December 1828, denying their right to be considered representatives of the rank and file of the Federalist party and, therefore, refusing to disclose to them the names of any of the leaders allegedly connected with the 1808 plot to dismember the Union. “It is not improbable that, at some future day, a sense of solemn duty to my country may require of me to disclose the evidence which I do possess, and for which you call,” he concluded. “But of that day the selection must be at my own judgment” (HA, New-England Federalism , p. 46–62). Correctly anticipating further assaults, he renewed his request that CFA collect old pamphlets and newspapers which could help him (JQA to CFA, 31 Dec. 1828, Adams Papers).