Diary of Charles Francis Adams, volume 2

Tuesday. 23rd. CFA Tuesday. 23rd. CFA
Tuesday. 23rd.

Rode to town and went to the Office. Engaged the larger part of the morning in arranging my brother’s and putting my father’s Accounts in some order. Copied the papers relating to administration upon my brother’s estate and made some purchases for the family at Quincy. Afternoon passed in packing up my Clothes at Mrs. Tarbell’s, which I leave today. This took pretty nearly all my available time. I then rode to Quincy with a new horse which pleased me very much. Had much conversation with my father in relation to his prospects in regard to his property. He was very communicative upon the subject of his intentions.1 I hardly know what opinion to form in 394regard to them, but as I feel it to be my duty to make some representation in regard to it, and to follow up a decided course to assist him, I wish as clearly as possible to comprehend his designs.

1.

JQA s record of the conversation disclosed more of his intentions. He made CFA his Boston agent because of his desire “that one of my sons at least should settle in this place of my nativity.” “My first object,” he added, “is to place my property in such a state that I may live with my family without encroaching upon my capital. The next is to build a house here in which my Library, my own manuscript books and papers and those of my father may be deposited” (JQA, Diary, 23 June 1829).

Wednesday 24th. CFA Wednesday 24th. CFA
Wednesday 24th.

Morning, rode to town. Engaged busily all the morning in business belonging to my father’s estate or my brother’s affairs, so that I can hardly be said to have had any for my own. The larger part of the time was occupied in going to the various tenants and making inquiries in regard to the state of the rents. I find them all sadly backward. George, poor fellow, was not fit for the situation, he understood little of business and was not pleased with that. Money was to him, an article which was useful in life without his ever knowing how he might obtain it. His qualities which made him so agreeable a companion, were the ones which incapacitated him for the purposes of active life. In the afternoon, I went to No. 47 Chesnut Street to look at some Furniture which was to be sold tomorrow, some of which is wanted at Quincy. John came to town for the like purpose and I met him at my Office just as it was time for me to go to Medford. Rode to Medford and found Abby as usual. Afternoon and evening agreeable though I was exceedingly fatigued. Mrs. Brooks looks badly.

Thursday. 25th. CFA Thursday. 25th. CFA
Thursday. 25th.

Morning, return to town. Attended the Sale of the Furniture of Messrs. Clark and Dunn and purchased some things which were bargains, others not so much so, the usual luck at Auctions.1 This and the arrangements necessary to remove them took me all the morning and a portion of the afternoon. The rest was occupied in making up agency accounts, and my administration papers. The trial of the case of Farnum vs Brooks concluded today and peace and order will be again restored to the good city of Boston.2 Returned to Quincy and passed the evening in conversation with my father, principally the Controversy3 upon which he still feels sore.

1.

Coolidge & Haskell, auctioneers, announced an assignee’s sale of “Genteel Furniture” at 47 Chesnut Street, the home of John Clark, a dry goods mer-395chant (Boston Daily Advertiser, 25 June 1829; Boston Directory, 1829–1830).

2.

See entry for 16 June, and note, above.

3.

JQA’s disagreement with the “thirteen confederates.” See entries for 7 and 25 Feb., above.