Diary of Charles Francis Adams, volume 8

Monday 8th. CFA Monday 8th. CFA
Monday 8th.

A cold morning with the wind from the Eastward. Day spent in town. Evening at the Mansion.

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My day was not a very profitable one and yet my duties in town required that it should be so spent. I was enabled to finish much of the matter regarding tenants which has embarrassed me of late, and to execute a great number of commissions.

Dined at Dr. Frothingham’s and from thence went to attend a Meeting of the South Cove Corporation. The object was to consider a plan submitted by the Directors for releasing the Company from the great burden of debt which presses upon it. J. Quincy Jr. opened the project which in fact consists of dividing to the Stockholders a sufficient portion of the land to induce them to take up individually their share of the debt. The remainder would then be free from difficulty and divisible or convertible at the first favorable opportunity. The meeting was full and there was much discussion pro and con, but inasmuch as no easy alternative presented itself and the case was pressing the proposed plan was unanimously adopted.

This business is a vexatious one to me because I fell into it against my consent and am now becoming doubly responsible almost against my will. I must change my investments to meet this new aspect of things. The ultimate success of the property I hardly permit myself to doubt, but not through the contracting of double engagements. My anxiety of mind upon pecuniary subjects is such that I dislike the appearance of extended liabilities in any form. And yet to some extent I shall feel obliged to do so. I trust in this as in all other matters to a divine providence which will not desert those who seek to regulate their course with prudence and self distrust.

Home not until after sunset. Nothing material for the evening. Workmen blowing rocks again today.

Tuesday 9th. CFA Tuesday 9th. CFA
Tuesday 9th.

Cold, chilly day. Morning to town. Afternoon at home and also evening.

My father accompanied me to town. I devoted the greater part of the morning to Accounts, particularly as my father called for those which are now back. Finished two, when the time arrived for return.

Afternoon spent partly in overseeing the men dragging out the stone, and in Lucretius, b. 5, 1150–1300, with whom I am more pleased as I go on. We remained at home this evening instead of visiting the Mansion as there was company there.

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