Diary of Charles Francis Adams, volume 2

Monday 20th. CFA Monday 20th. CFA
Monday 20th.

Arose very late owing to the darkness of the morning. It rained very heavily for the first time since my arrival here. Detained at home all day, occupied in very little. A little of Columbus in the morning and the life of Byron in the remainder of the day. Little news of any kind. 298Evening quiet with the family. The political affairs of the day are now rapidly approaching the crisis. I wish it over very heartily.

Tuesday. 21st. CFA Tuesday. 21st. CFA
Tuesday. 21st.

Morning pleasant. After copying a little, passed the morning in great indolence. Went out with Thomas B. Adams to show him some of the Lions of the City. We went to the Capitol Hill and I made a stop with him at Judge Cranch’s for him to deliver some letters. We then walked over the Capitol looking at all things that were to be seen: to me they were familiar, but I was still glad of an opportunity to look at them again, perhaps for the last time. After a considerable examination, we returned, having passed the afternoon pretty completely. After dinner Mrs. Smith, Abby Adams, Thomas and I went down to drink tea with Mrs. Frye. We found Johnson Hellen there. Mrs. Newman from Baltimore is at present on a visit to her. The evening passed quite pleasantly.

Wednesday 22nd. CFA Wednesday 22nd. CFA
Wednesday 22nd.

Morning pleasant. Occupied in copying a little and find that I shall get through with the Vaughan papers during my stay here. Read some of Mr. Burke. Received a letter from Abby which was extremely pleasant and in answering it, John and Thomas interrupted me to go with them fishing. This passed the afternoon. We went to the rocks near Mrs. Frye’s and had pretty good sport. I returned and finished my regular letter to Abby notwithstanding. In the evening we had a pleasant Oyster Supper after which Thomas and I took a long walk. The night was lovely.

Thursday 23rd. CFA Thursday 23rd. CFA
Thursday 23rd.

Morning quite warm. This season is what they call here Indian Summer. At home reading Mr. Burke on the State of the Nation. Passed the afternoon in making an outline of a letter to Mr. Brooks. The Oyster Supper did not quite agree with me. Took a ride with my Mother. A company to dine today. Gov. Cass, Mr., Mrs. and Miss Eliot, Miss Lamb,1 Judge and Miss Cranch, Mrs. Dawes, Mr. and Mrs. Barrel, Dr. Watkins, Dr. Huntt, Mr. Persico,2 Col. Trumbull, Mr. Frye and the family. It was a singular collection but it passed off very well. I sat between Mr. Persico and Dr. Huntt.

1.

Hannah Dawes Eliot, who was shortly to marry Thomas Lamb, of Boston, was accompanied by her parents and by her future sister-in-law (Columbian Centinel, 5 Nov. 1828).

2.

E. Luigi Persico (1791–1860), the 299Neapolitan sculptor who was engaged to execute several pieces for the Capitol (Groce and Wallace, Dict. Amer. Artists ).