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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0009-0014

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-09-14

Sunday 14th.

We arrived at Baltimore at about four o’clock and I dressed immediately to go up and obtain a seat in the Mail for Washington. But I found great difficulty in getting any place at all owing to the number of persons going on, and it was only by taking an outside seat in an extra stage that I managed to go on. Nothing particular happened but in travelling onward I could not help remarking how very much altered was the state of my feelings at this time from any preceding journey in this direction. My interests and associations are now fixed elsewhere and nothing but the remaining term of my father’s Presidency whether short or long gives it any kind of charm. I dressed myself upon my arrival at Gadsby’s1 and walked up to the house.
Found my Mother very much better and sitting up though still extremely weak from the great violence of her attack. Mary, my brother’s wife, very well, Abby Adams, my Aunt and Uncle Smith, my father and John very well. Those compose the family. The two last only arrived yesterday. They all treated me very kindly. I conversed with my Mother until dinner time, and after it, rode with John to my Aunt Frye’s, where they seemed quite glad to see me. But on returning I came near finishing my visit. John’s horse became restless, and I was thrown out in one of his plunges. My head was bruised and my shoulder but luckily with no further damage, which considering { 283 } my very flat and heavy fall, may be esteemed providential. I walked home and retired soon after, being in much pain.
1. Gadsby’s National Hotel, on Pennsylvania Avenue at Sixth Street (Bryan, Hist. of the National Capital , 2:61).