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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0020

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-20

Friday. 20th.

Morning at the Office. And in Court. Heard a case argued of little importance and without affording much instruction. But it is still of service to me to be here as it makes me familiar with practice and with men. Conversation for an hour, with George. Afternoon, finished Smith’s Chapter on the Colonies as a system of policy. Evening at the Theatre. Rob Roy and the Quartette, pieces of very little merit. Madame Feron1 —not pleased with her style of singing. Too artificial. I like art and execution but not alone. It drowns the natural effect of simple sounds when produced incessantly. She did not sing the Soldier { 349 } Tir’d so well as Mrs. Austin. But her voice is sweeter, and her low notes are much more clear and effective. On the whole, not well satisfied particularly as I breasted the heaviest snow storm we have had this winter, on my return. This exertion and a heavy fall which I had put me a little out of spirits.
1. The two operas were Rob Roy MacGregor, or Auld Lang Syne, a musical adaptation of Sir Walter Scott’s novel, by John Davy and Henry Rowley Bishop, and The Quartette, by Charles E. Horn. Madame Elizabeth Feron (1793–1853) was an English singer who had made her first American appearance in 1828 (Brown, History of the American Stage, p. 122).