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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0018

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-18

Tuesday 18th.

This morning marks my twenty second birth day. Much has passed since the last event of the kind, both for good and for evil. I have suffered and I have enjoyed as is the lot of all mortals in this scene of vicissitudes. Our family has had a year of trouble yet sees much to be thankful for. We have descended into the rank of private citizens without regret and lamentation, but the private troubles have been to us both deep and distressing. There has also been pleasure. My brother John has given my Mother an object of interest in his child and a bond in which all the family are united. We have on the other hand lost a member and the young head of the family. My own feelings have been of a mixed character. The first half of the year brought with it much bitterness, disappointment and ill health but the other half has been rapidly paying me by much happiness unalloyed. To the future I decline looking for as that contains many deep and dark spots, I have no fancy to reflect upon their appearance. Enough of this.
Rode to town, the weather dark, gloomy and threatening. At the Office, where I was occupied most of the morning drawing up the deed which Mr. Curtis had given me, but I had no time to finish it. The rain came down in torrents and after having done every thing which was necessary, I left for Quincy. My ride was rainy and disagreeable. I reached there to dinner. My father kindly remembered the day and wished me happiness. I wish it to myself more on his account than my own, for he has drunk bitterness to the dregs. At four, notwithstanding the rain, I started with the little Carriage for Providence. John, our man servant, only with me. The rain was behind us so we suffered but little excepting during a mistake of the road which John made carrying us out of the way for some distance. This delayed us at Walpole until nine o’clock when we reached Fuller’s1 and I then took supper and retired immediately for the night.
1. The Half-Way House in South Walpole was run by Stephen Fuller Jr. (Willard De Lue, The Story of Walpole, 1724–1924, Norwood, Mass., 1925, p. 225).