A website from the Massachusetts Historical Society; founded 1791.
close

Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0028

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-28

Friday. 28th.

Returned to town with Mr. Brooks after writing Mr. Stetson a Note1 to ask him to officiate as the Clergyman. This is not very agreeable to me but I am unwilling to cause any kind of trouble and have therefore consented to be married by a Man for whom I have but little respect. My morning was taken up without my being at the Office much as I was obliged to be in search of the remaining Articles of Furniture for my little Library. I did not succeed however in getting any thing but some Chairs. I then went to see Mr. Cruft about the pictures but could not find him at home. This was a walk for nothing, then to the House where I found that my Carpenter had succeeded in getting the case up, at last, but I regret to think it will not be quite enough. I have however already exceeded my means in this business and must therefore stop.
{ 428 }
Miss Harriet Welsh called to see me and to ask after my mother. I could tell her nothing. She goes tomorrow to Wiscasset and leaves this City no doubt in grief and with regret. I am sorry for her. Change is the spirit of the world. To many it comes in agreeable shapes, to others again it wears a more cloudy aspect. So it is now with her and with me, but the future may pay us both. Returning to the Office, I found that if I wished to get to Quincy I must hurry to reach their dinner. I again went down to see Mr. Sharpe for my Furniture,2 again failed and then started for Quincy. My horse pushed on and I arrived there.
Found that my father had received letters last night from my Mother and John at Philadelphia.3 She was better, and about as well as when I first saw her. May she be better, but futurity presents to me no further interest in her such as the past has been. I have been to her a devoted son and in every thing where I could have attempted to gratify her. She takes but little interest in the connexion which I am forming and which is going to take the place of her own former dues. I regret it, and still more that it has been necessary to take away from me a graceful parting.
The afternoon was rather wasted in looking over my wardrobe and preparing it for removal, and in assorting the Newspapers which have been accumulating ever since I came to Quincy. Evening, Conversation with my father. His expedition to Braintree.
1. Missing.
2. James Sharp, who lived at 426 Washington Street, manufactured ornamental furniture ( Boston Directory, 1829–1830).
3. The letter from JA2 is missing.