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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0009-0002

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-09-02

Wednesday 2d.

Morning, early return to Boston calling upon Mr. Bartlett on the way and obtaining the Medford Certificate. The weather was exceedingly warm, and sultry. I wrote my Journal and walked up to the House to see how it looked. But nothing was changed since my visit of yesterday. The workmen not having as yet arrived. I lounged here for some time, Mrs. Frothingham, Mrs. P. Chardon Brooks, and Miss Phillips having come to do their share towards beautifying. Being tired of Indolence I then went down to take a Bath, and enjoyed a great luxury in a warm one. My system seems to be a little out of order by my trip to New York and I thought this might be a benefit to it. I enjoyed it much. Thence I went to my Office feeling very languid. The heat was greater to my feeling than at any other time this season. The air being a hot South wind.
I went to Quincy to dine, it being the last day upon which I shall probably be there in a similar way. In the afternoon I was occupied in packing my things and making the final arrangements here. I regret a little leaving here and this way of life for with many disadvantages it has some pleasures and not a little Independence. But I have views and objects in life other than this loose way allows, and I have affections which are worth cultivating now if ever. My father may miss me a little but my Company has been but little to him this Summer and he has become so attached to his way of life that it has nothing to require in addition. I copied a letter from him to Col. Knapp1 and performed the few last duties which will fall upon me for the present. Evening, rain and lightning after the great heat, the clouds { 432 } passed however, threatening much but performing little. Conversation with my father—Persico and the ornamenting of the Capitol. Few people in this Country are aware of the fact that he is the source of all that is ornamental in the Statuary sculpture about the Capitol. Persico has done well in executing the ideas not his own but how few here know or would give credit if they did to the source from whence the taste really proceeded.2
1. CFA’s copy of JQA’s letter to Samuel Knapp, 2 Sept. 1829, is in JQA’s Letter-books, Adams Papers.
2. For hints of JQA’s contributions toward the sculptured decoration of the United States Capitol, see his Memoirs, 7:20–21; 8:45–46, 81, 123; 9:193.