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Browsing: Diary of John Quincy Adams, Volume 1


Docno: ADMS-03-01-02-0004-0007-0023

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1782-06-23

23d. Sunday.

In the afternoon went with Mr. D. and Mr. Artaud; to a Garden about 6 wersts out of town, called Jardin de Narischkin belonging to a nobleman of that name, who keeps it open to the publick.1 Went afterwards to a country seat belonging to a gentleman here.
1. Henry Storch portrayed a visit to the Narischkin garden as a popular Sunday pastime of the “higher classes”:
"A friendly invitation, in four different languages, inscribed over the entrance to the grounds, authorizes every one of decent appearance and behaviour, to amuse himself there in whatever way he pleases without fear of molestation. In several pavilions are musicians for the benefit of those who chuse to dance; in others are chairs and sophas, ready for the reception of any party who wish to recreate themselves by sedate conversation after roaming about with the great throng; some parties take to the swings, the bowling-green and other diversions; on the canals and lakes are gondolas, some constructed for rowing, others for sailing; and, if all this be not enough, refreshments are spread on tables in particular alcoves, or are handed about by servants in livery. This noble hospitality is by no means unenjoyed; the concourse of persons of all descriptions, from the star and ribband to the plain well-dressed burgher, forms such a party-coloured collection and sometimes groupes are so humourously contrasted, that for this reason alone it is well worth the pains of partaking once in the amusement" ( Picture of Petersburg , p. 440–441).