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Browsing: Legal Papers of John Adams, Volume 1


Descriptive List of Illustrations
Descriptive List of Illustrations

Descriptive List of Illustrations

[Note: for permissions reasons, not all illustrations from the letterpress volumes are available in this digital edition.]

Descriptive List of Illustrations

 

John Adams, by Benjamin Blyth ||facing page|| 30

Executed in 1766, during one of Adams' visits to Salem, this is the only portrait depicting Adams during his years at the bar when, according to his own later description he looked “like a short, thick, fat Archbishop of Canterbury.” See 1 JA, Diary and Autobiography ix, and vol. 2:106, below.
Courtesy of the Massachusetts Historical Society.
 

View of Boston, by Christian Remick ||facing page|| 31

This portrayal of the landing of the British troops in 1768 shows something of the commercial and maritime aspects of Boston's North End. Paul Revere was the engraver. See Clarence S. Brigham, Paul Revere's Engravings 58–64 (Worcester, 1954).
Courtesy of the American Antiquarian Society.
 

Writ and Account ||facing page|| 62

A fine example of Adams' fee scale, of the writ form he used, and of his occasional collection problems. Note that although the debtor was William Whitmarsh, part of the fee arose from Adams' activity in an action between Isaac and Joseph Tirrell.
From the Suffolk Files, courtesy of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts.
 

John Hancock's Account with John Adams ||facing page|| 63

This is Adams' statement for legal services rendered from 1769 to 1772, set off by two guineas in cash (probably by way of retainer) and a set of the folio volumes of State Trials.
Courtesy of Nathaniel Stein.
 

Handwriting Samples ||facing page|| 126

An unusual example of “real evidence” introduced by the respective parties in King v. Stewart,No. 2. The upper document, introduced by Stewart, is a receipt in his hand; the lower document, introduced by King, is the threatening note.
From the Suffolk Files, courtesy of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts.
 

Record, Superior Court of Judicature ||facing page|| 127

A page from the 1769 volume, folio, showing the beginning of the record in Gill v. Mein,No. 5.
From the Suffolk Files, courtesy of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts.
{ 16 }  

Venire Facias, Superior Court of Judicature ||facing page|| 158

The summons to the constables of Pembroke to cause the selection of grand and petit jurors for the May 1765 Superior Court sitting at Plymouth.
From the Suffolk Files, courtesy of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts.
 

Jury List, Superior Court of Judicature ||facing page|| 158

The complete panel of grand and petit jurors for the May 1765 Superior Court sitting at Plymouth, indicating the veniremen excused, sick, and not selected, as well as the lineup of the two trial juries.
From the Suffolk Files, courtesy of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts.
 

Cambridge in 1775 ||facing page|| 159

This view of the Pitman Diorama in the Widener Library shows three shire towns (court seats): Cambridge—the courthouse being the building with a cupola, across from the church—Charlestown (center background), and Boston (right background).
Courtesy of Harvard University Library.
 

Minute Book, Superior Court of Judicature ||facing page|| 222

Two pages from Minute Book 89, showing the adjournment of the February 1769 term and the opening of the August 1769 term.
From the Suffolk Files, courtesy of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts.
 

Minute Book, Suffolk County Court of General Sessions ||facing page|| 223

Two pages of the Minute Book, covering the opening of the April term, 1769, “the first Sessions in the new Courthouse, in Queen Street,” and showing a sampling of the court's administrative functions.
From the Suffolk Files, courtesy of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts.
 

Coroner's Inquisition or Inquest ||facing page|| 254

The preliminary examination into any unexplained death was the duty of the coroner's jury; the result of its investigation was the inquisition, signed by the coroner and all the jurors. This example, although not connected with Adams' practice, is typical; it concerns Timothy Mirick of Springfield, whose death “by the misfortune of the Bite of a Rattle Snake” in time inspired the ballad “Springfield Mountain.”
From the Suffolk Files, courtesy of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts.
{ 17 }  

Jeremiah Lee, by John Singleton Copley ||facing page|| 255

This Marblehead merchant owned the Merrill, whose insurance furnished the stakes in Bancroft v. Lee,No. 10, and Crowinshield v. Lee, No. 11.
Courtesy of the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford.
 

Samuel Winthrop, by John Singleton Copley ||facing page|| 255

Brother of Harvard's Professor John Winthrop, Clerk of the Superior Court of Judicature, and John Adams' social companion; see 1 JA, Diary and Autobiography 345, 356, 357; 3 id. 299.
Courtesy of the Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University.