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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 2


Search for a response to this letter.

Docno: ADMS-06-02-02-0036

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Tudor, William
Date: 1774-08-28

To William Tudor

[salute] Dr. Sir

I received your obliging Letter at New York, and it was peculiarly acceptable to me and my Companions, and of great Use to Us among our Friends at New York. We all intreat the Continuance of your Favours, you can have no Idea of the Pleasure We take, in the Letters of our Friends and especially in yours because the Contents of it were very usefully particular and interesting. The Generals Character has gained no Accession of Dignity or Honour from his Treatment of your worthy Coll.
I am determined to write no Politicks, because Letters may miscarry. It is Sufficient to Say that our Accounts from every Quarter of the Disposition of the People is very favourable. New York and Philadelphia, Cities, which contain the greatest Numbers of artfull and lukewarm People, are put wholly out of Countenance, by the Spirited Patriotism of all the other Colonies.
In the Course of my Tour, I have had an opportunity of Seeing many Lawyers, of Eminence in their several Countries.—Mr. Paine, and Mr. Seymour at Hartford—Mr. Hosmore at Middleton—Mr. Douglass and even Mr. Ingersoll at Connecticutt—Mr. Smith, Mr. Scott, Mr. Duane, Mr. Jay at New York—Mr. Hood and Mr. Serjeant at the Jerseys1—&c.
{ 134 }
RC (MHi:Tudor Papers); endorsed: “August 28 1774.”
1. For a detailed account of the trip through Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey, see JA, Diary and Autobiography , 2:98–115.