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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 6


Search for a response to this letter.

Docno: ADMS-06-06-02-0004-0002

Author: Brouquen
Recipient: Adams, John
Date: 1778-04-03

Brouquen to John Adams: A Translation

[salute] Sir

You were kind enough to let me anticipate your stopping at the Marquis de Voyer d'Argenson's house, at The Elms, two stages after Cha• { 9 } telereault. I am informing him accordingly. He will be most pleased to meet you since he already knows much about you and, indeed, it would be very difficult for you not to be known. As for me, sir, I have sought this privilege with as much pleasure as eagerness, but so far the only homage I have been able to pay you is through my deep interest in your reputation.1 Receive as well the respect and admiration with which I have the honor to be your very humble and very obedient servant.
[signed] Brouquen2
RC (Adams Paper); docketed in JA 's late hand: “French Letter Bourdeaux 3d. April 1778 3 days after my Arrival at that City.”
1. In view of the numerous instances in which people confused JA with Samuel Adams, the “reputation” to which Brouquen refers may well be that of the latter (see JA, Diary and Autobiography , 2:351–352).
2. Brouquen, who remains an obscure figure, may have been the man addressed by Silas Deane on 20 Feb. as “Monsr. Brouquins, Receiver Genl., Bordeaux” ( Deane Papers , 2:379). He may also, or instead, have been the secretary or Bordeaux agent of Marc-René, marquis de Voyer d'Argenson (1722–1782), military commandant of the department of Poitou (Hoefer, Nouv. biog. générale ). JA accepted the invitation from Brouquen and spent the night of 6–7 April at Les Ormes, the seat of the Marquis. JA describes the Marquis' establishment and the surrounding area graphically in Diary and Autobiography , 2:295–296; 4:40.