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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 11


Search for a response to this letter.

Docno: ADMS-06-11-02-0001

Author: President of Congress
Author: Huntington, Samuel
Recipient: Netherlands, States General of
Date: 1781-01-01

Letter of Credence to the States General of the Netherlands

[salute] High and Mighty Lords

The United States of North America in Congress Assembled impressed with a high sense of the wisdom and magnanimity of your high Mightinesses and of your inviolable attachment to the rights and liberties of mankind and being desirous of cultivating the friendship of a Nation eminent for its wisdom Justice and moderation have appointed the honble. John Adams late a Delegate in Congress from the State of Massachusetts and a member of the Council of that State to be their Minister Plenipotentiary to reside near you that he may give you more particular Assurances of the great respect they entertain for Your High Mightinesses. We beseech your High Mightinesses to give entire credit to every thing which our said Minister shall deliver on our part especially when he shall assure you of the sincerity of our friendship and regard.
We pray God to keep your High Mightinesses in his holy protection.
Done at Philadelphia the first day of January in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and Eighty one and in the fifth year of our Independence By the Congress of the United States.

[salute] Your friends

[signed] Sam. Huntington President
[signed] Attest Chas. Thomson Secy.
MS (Adams Papers); endorsed: “Letter of Credence to the States General, dated 1. January. 1781.”
1. Congress approved JA 's letter of credence on 3 Jan., the date under which it appears in the JCC (19:17–18). The president of Congress sent it to JA as an enclosure in a letter of 9 Jan., below. JA received his letter of credence on 6 April (to the president of Congress, 6 April, below).