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Browsing: Adams Family Correspondence, Volume 1


Search for a response to this letter.

Docno: ADMS-04-01-02-0140

Author: Adams, Abigail
Recipient: Paine, Eunice
Date: 1775-06-03

Abigail Adams to Eunice Paine

[salute] Dear Silvia

So good an opportunity offering, tho I had not wrote before I have detaind the Bearer, just to thank you for your obliging favour, and ask you how you do? I know how much you have sufferd for your Friends, and pitty your distance from them. As news like the Snow Ball, { 210 } allways gathers according to the distance it passes, we were not so much allarmd here as one would have immagined; but at Weymouth they were greatly distress'd for a while. Last Saturday Night we felt all the powers of Sympathy—the continued roar of the cannon predicted many slain upon both Sides.
But thanks be to that Being who hath heitherto coverd the Heads of our Breathren in the Day of Blood and Slaughter, not one man fallen upon our Side, hundreds upon theirs as tis credibly said.1
We must Expect continual allarms, and prepair ourselves for them—if they are affraid our people Will be taking advantages from that circumstance. An intercepted letter from Gage says he has not 36 hundred men in the Town of Boston.—I wait with much impatience to hear from the Congress. Not one word since I heard from New York. Adieu. I will write soon again. Pray remember me to all inquiring Friends, and write me every opportunity. Mrs. Cranch is very sick with the rash. Yours most affectionately,
[signed] Portia
RC (MH); addressed: “To Miss Eunice Paine Taunton.”
1. These were actions in Boston Harbor on 26–27 May. Provincial troops raided Noddle's Island (now East Boston) and nearby Hog (now Breed's) Island, burned British hay stores, drove off and killed a quantity of livestock there, and later blew up a grounded British naval schooner, Diana, in Chelsea Creek. See French, First Year , p. 190–193, 736–737.

Docno: ADMS-04-01-02-0141

Author: Paine, Eunice
Recipient: Adams, Abigail
Date: 1775-06-04

Eunice Paine to Abigail Adams

[salute] My Dear Portia

Yours received last Evening deserves my Early acknowledgment; as a token of your Love, it revived my drooping Spirits; as a Testimony of your Comfortable Existance, it turn'd my heart to Praise; and your kind Promise to write again soon, gives me a pleasing Expectation. I was deny'd a pleasure which I should have made a [merit?] had we received the Packet from Newport a few hours sooner; but Tommy was gone when the Dear Epistle arrive'd which Capt. Beale Brot from New York and left in his trunk, you heard of it I suppose, and I hope to send it in a day or two.1
I am told you look Charmingly, that you have your sister with you, and Enjoy yourself nicely. I rejoyce in your portion and most heartily wish myself near Eno' to Step in and Share the feast of soul. I am wretchedly of[f] here, Books all packt away, Company all Strangers, all Anxious, distress't, if I was writing to Mrs. Cranch I should say all Charlstown folks. I have no support, no Chear up from any o' them. { 211 } I seek retirement, and here in my own Chamber only can feel tolerable. The constant Exercise of my mind here is not friendly to the Body. My Strength wastes and all kinds of activity is Burdensome and I often fear I shall fall a sacrifice to Lord Norths mandates but I determine to try my utmost against him, and if it be possible to get a horse I can ride, once more visit the happy Land.
Four men have Just came on to the Green from Roxbury this day, they bring us accounts of the Deer Island Expedition. Not a Gun fire'd, 500 sheep recover'd, nine Prisoners taken. Amazing. I am lost in Admiration! Also thirteen regulars taken in a Boat up Cambridge River, tamely Surrender'd. I cant Express the Language of my heart but hope to gain Courage from these instances of the Divine favor.—I wonder how Gage and his Counsellors feel. I have heard that the Latter have tho't on the Missasippa (I dont know if tis spelt right) for a retreat at the last Cast—poor wretches I wish they were prepare'd for dissolution. My pen is so intollerable bad I fear you can't Guess out my scrawl. You must Call in Polly Palmers assistance and be assure'd I would do better if I cou'd. I am now holding my akeing head. A Cold oppresses me sorely. I hope yours is Easy and all your little ones well, that your farm is finely flourishing. We were Blest with most refreshing showers yesterday and all nature sparkles here to day. We have numerous favors to rejoyce us, therefore let us Keep up good Spirits. My Love & Duty to All your Good friends. This from your Rusticated
[signed] Silvia
RC (Adams Papers); addressed: “For Mrs: Abigail Adams at Braintree.”
1. This was JA 's letter to AA of 8 May, concerning the delay of which see also AA to JA , 24 May; both are printed above.