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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0007-0006

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-07-06

Sunday 6th.

This day was passed very quietly indeed. I have been obliged to wear thin shoes and silk stockings ever since Thursday as my boots had given way. This made my going to Meeting a disagreeable business, so I declined going. I read a large part of Hutchinson’s third volume of the History of Massachusetts. I think there is much reason on his { 254 } side. A stroll in the afternoon about the grounds in a fit of musing such as often occurs to me but now with more pleasure and less alloy than is usual. I believe myself on the whole in better condition at this time than I have been for years. Genl. Wadsworth of Geneseo and Son1 called. In the evening with Abby. A poor man in the employ of Mr. Brooks was discovered this evening in the Mystic river just below the bridge. Some were with him but he lost his life because they had not courage nor presence of mind.
1. CFA seems to have confused the family relationships here. James Samuel Wadsworth (1807–1864), the future Union general, was studying law in Daniel Webster’s office. His father, James Wadsworth, was not a general, while his uncle, General William Wadsworth, was a bachelor. See entry for 28 June, and note, above; Appletons’ Cyclo. Amer. Biog. ; DAB ; and Pearson, James S. Wadsworth, p. 13.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0007-0007

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-07-07

Monday. July 7th.

Mr. Brooks rode into town with me this morning as he did also on Saturday which I forgot to mention. He treats me very kindly and if I had only a definite idea of his feelings in regard to Abby I should be perfectly satisfied. Office. Received another letter from my Mother in hardly so pleasant a tone as the last. Rode with George to Weston to see about the sale of the hay off the place. This took an amazingly long time, but sold tolerably well. I amused myself with entering into conversation with the different farmers and attempting to extract information on various rustic subjects. My return to Boston was so long delayed that I was compelled to give up the idea of Quincy for the night much to my mortification and annoyance. Remained at the Exchange Coffee House.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0007-0008

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-07-08

Tuesday 8th.

Had but little agreeable rest, the accommodations were so bad and I found myself compelled to dress in my old stock of clothes, and go through the day very dirty. Morning at the Office. Wrote a letter to my father although I have received none from him this week, owing probably to the celebration of the fourth. Read a little of Kent. Wadsworth left us and Emerson is in the Insane Hospital so that we are now reduced to Davis and I. Afternoon, Executive Record. Rode to Quincy and found myself much rejoiced to be again quietly at my room. Took a salt water bath with my Uncle and Thomas. The water was delicious and I felt glad to regain a little of my usual neatness. Conversation.
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