A website from the Massachusetts Historical Society; founded 1791.
close

Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0012-0019

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-12-19

Friday. 19th.

Morning in Court and at the Office. Read the Massachusetts Reports as usual and passed a useful morning. The weather was severely cold but clear and pleasant, otherwise. Abby was in town but I missed seeing her. Afternoon reading Mr. Pitkin, the first years of the Federal Constitution. Evening reading Dr. Johnson’s Life of Frederick of Prussia and Mr. Boswell. The day on the whole very profitably employed. I am better satisfied with my present way of life than I have been with any for some years past. It meets more my idea of what is a man’s duty to himself. My reflections are all agreeable, and though few of the more violent gratifications of life come to distract the equa• { 325 } nimity of my spirits, yet I will willingly forego them to be rid of the distressing excess on the other side. My feelings have undergone a decided change for the better ever since I commenced this Volume.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0012-0020

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-12-20

Saturday 20th.

Morning at the Office. Wrote a short letter to my Mother, but as I have but little to say myself, and she has not lately written to me, my sheet was but half filled. I do not propose to write much more as I have lost my interest very much in affairs there. Made one or two visits to J. R. Otis, and T. Davis, so that I did very little. Afternoon, finished Mr. Pitkin’s history. In the evening, I attended a Moot Court to which I have been lately admitted, consisting of the young Lawyers at the Bar. Heard an argument relating to the validity of judgments of one State in the Courts of another. J. Quincy Jr. and E. J. Lowell.1 It was very well.
1. Edward J. Lowell, an attorney whose office was at 39 Court Street ( Boston Directory, 1829–1830).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0012-0021

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-12-21

Sunday 21st.

Morning attended at Meeting and heard Dr. Channing deliver a Sermon on the substance of natural religion, the unity of God. It was not to me as good as usual. My thoughts were more difficult to control. But some passages seemed eloquent. The reason that I did not like it was that there was a little sectarianism, and not a little weak argument in it in it’s support. This gave me a dislike to it which I could not well get over. After dinner I went to Medford and passed the evening pleasantly as usual.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0012-0022

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-12-22

Monday 22nd.

Morning, returned to Boston. The weather exceedingly cold but clear. I had a tolerably pleasant ride and found a comfortable fire at my Office to gratify me. Read Law much as usual. In the afternoon, looked over a few pages of the Federalist without any interest. This book never could fix my attention. Evening, attended with Mr. Tarbell, at the Meeting House in Federal Street, to hear an address delivered by Mr. Russell on the subject of Infant Schools.1 A new improvement of the present day. I listened without being convinced and understood without being delighted. Read Mr. Webster’s trial.2
1. William Russell, editor of the Journal of Education (Columbian Centinel, 24 Dec. 1828).
2. See entry for 16 Dec., and note, above.
{ 326 }