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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0001-0012

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-01-12

Monday. 12th.

Returned to town this morning. The weather still cold, but much moderated. Morning at the Office. Massachusetts Reports. A long case upon the Law of Insurance. Slight peevishness at dinner, being { 334 } rather troubled with questions. Afternoon, finished Mr. Burke on French Affairs and with the subject, ends the Copy of his Works which I have. Evening, finished the Tour to the Hebrides which has interested me much. I admire it as a travelling sketch very much. The grandiloquence of Johnson is not generally popular at this day, but there is a philosophical tone attending his reflections, to me far more than equal such an objection.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0001-0013

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-01-13

Tuesday. 13th.

Morning at the Office. Massachusetts Reports. I was occupied some time in hunting about the Town for some Coal, which is rather scarce. Found some for my Office at last. Read over the case upon Insurance, and examined some of the special Statutes of the State. In the afternoon, commenced reading Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations which I propose to study with attention.1 It is quite interesting. Evening, Dr. Boswell and Johnson’s smaller Works, particularly his Taxation, no Tyranny, which is flimsy.
1. A set of The Whole Works of Adam Smith, 4 vols., London, 1822, is in the Stone Library. JA’s copies of Smith’s Wealth of Nations, one published in London, 1778, 2 vols., and a French edition published in Yverdon, 1781, 6 vols., are in the Boston Public Library ( Catalogue of JA’s Library , p. 232).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0001-0014

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-01-14

Wednesday. 14th.

The day was mild and rainy, which kept me at the Office employed almost constantly. This may be said to have been a well occupied space of time. The morning in examining some principles of Insurance Law, the afternoon in studying Adam Smith and the evening in reading Mr. Boswell. But upon such exertions, little occurs to remark, excepting that I find my principal difficulty consists in not being able to retain enough of what I read.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0001-0015

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-01-15

Thursday. 15th.

The uniformity of a studious life is proverbial. I have little or no account to give of myself excepting that I was occupied all day in my various studies. A mild rain kept me securely in my Office without interruption. In the evening, I remained at home, being a little alarmed at a pain in my breast and shoulder which worried me. The re-action of the cold weather.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0001-0016

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-01-16

Friday. 16th.

This was a lovely day and the softness of the air relieved me con• { 335 } siderably from my pain which was still however, somewhat sharp. Morning passed in reading the Massachusetts Reports, and finished the Collection of Statutes of the State from which I have gained some information. Called upon Davis and spent half an hour with him in conversation, but felt dissatisfied afterwards at the waste of time. Afternoon, Adam Smith from whom I have already gained some ideas. I went to the Theatre this evening to hear Dr. Arne’s Opera of Artaxerxes. Mrs. Austin and Mr. Horn.1 I was abundantly pleased. The former sings very well. The latter is not so highly gifted in voice. On the whole, I have seldom been better satisfied at the Theatre. The Soldier tir’d, and the Quartett of Mild as the moonbeams were exceedingly pleasing.
1. Mrs. Austin, an English singer, and Charles E. Horn, an English actor, were appearing in the opera by Thomas Augustine Arne (Ireland, Records of the N.Y. Stage, 1:545–546; Brown, History of the American Stage, p. 185).