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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0016

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-16

Monday. 16th.

Morning at the Office. Received a pleasant letter from my Mother enclosing a present of a ten dollar bill. This was unexpected and hardly agreeable, for I know she has little and that I should be the one to give. I confess it is a relief though I might easily go on without it. But in accepting it, I shall put a stop to any thing similar in future. Perhaps a time may come when I can return it with interest. Passed a part of the morning in the Court of Common Pleas and George talked away the remainder. Afternoon pleasantly with Abby. I cannot help feeling a wish that ought not perhaps to be indulged, that the engagement was nearer to it’s close. But patience, three months have already { 348 } passed of the additional probation. Evening at the Office, reading Pope. Mr. Fletcher this day became a fellow boarder with me.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0017

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-17

Tuesday. 17th.

Morning at the Office and in Court of Common Pleas. Little of any consequence occurred. I am trying to pursue my simple course as well as I can. Had a client this morning through the kindness of Mr. Tarbell. Small debts to collect. Thus went the morning. Afternoon, engaged in reading Adam Smith which Abby’s departure from town enables me to resume. Evening, reading Pope—Eloisa to Abelard. A beautiful letter, if we examine the manner and the versification but something too sensual. I also read many of his smaller Poems.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0018

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-18

Wednesday 18th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. Three days have been passed in a single case of Leonard Foster against the City. It was so dull I could not stay. Pleas of land are dry things to argue upon. The rest of the morning passed in Law. Afternoon, Adam Smith, Chapter on Colonies. Evening, Pope’s Essay on Man. A style of Poem which does not interest me much. The day spent usefully but not without tedium. I feel the want of good society.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0019

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-19

Thursday. 19th.

Morning at the Office. Reading Law but not with any interest. The multiplicity of subjects distracts my attention and the dryness of detail worries my patience. Walked into Court, found the Supreme Court sitting to hear motions. Afternoon, Adam Smith upon the Colonial System, quite interesting but difficult. Evening, Pope Essays and Epistles.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0020

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-20

Friday. 20th.

Morning at the Office. And in Court. Heard a case argued of little importance and without affording much instruction. But it is still of service to me to be here as it makes me familiar with practice and with men. Conversation for an hour, with George. Afternoon, finished Smith’s Chapter on the Colonies as a system of policy. Evening at the Theatre. Rob Roy and the Quartette, pieces of very little merit. Madame Feron1 —not pleased with her style of singing. Too artificial. I like art and execution but not alone. It drowns the natural effect of simple sounds when produced incessantly. She did not sing the Soldier { 349 } Tir’d so well as Mrs. Austin. But her voice is sweeter, and her low notes are much more clear and effective. On the whole, not well satisfied particularly as I breasted the heaviest snow storm we have had this winter, on my return. This exertion and a heavy fall which I had put me a little out of spirits.
1. The two operas were Rob Roy MacGregor, or Auld Lang Syne, a musical adaptation of Sir Walter Scott’s novel, by John Davy and Henry Rowley Bishop, and The Quartette, by Charles E. Horn. Madame Elizabeth Feron (1793–1853) was an English singer who had made her first American appearance in 1828 (Brown, History of the American Stage, p. 122).