A website from the Massachusetts Historical Society; founded 1791.
close

Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0013

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-13

Friday 13th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. Little or nothing going on and I feel excessively tired of lounging. No letters from home yet. Nothing remarkable took place of any kind. My time is taken up pretty much. In my attendance at Court I am surprised at the absence of every thing { 356 } like agreeable speaking at our Bar. I am aware of the defect, but whether I could do better is a very doubtful point with me. I hope to attempt it at least. In the evening, I paid attention to Mr. Pope.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0014

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-14

Saturday. 14th.

Received a long letter from my father this morning, giving his account of the new administration. I was much entertained with it, though its tone from some unaccountable reason or other contributed to depress my spirits considerably. I did not remain in Court this morning and therefore occupied myself in my room as well as I could. Afternoon, wrote a letter to my Mother though she has not sent me a line for a month. Then took a walk which was not very agreeable from the severe cold. The weather continues uncommonly harsh for the season. Evening, Moot Court. No argument, and adjourned for the Season.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0015

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-15

Sunday. 15th.

Morning cold. Attended divine Service at the Church on Federal Street and heard Mr. Gannet deliver a tolerably good Sermon upon Prejudices. It suited me on the whole much better than any I have heard from him. After dinner I started for Medford. I reached the Turnpike in pretty good condition and had just reached a Snow bank when my Axle gave way, which put a stop to my proceeding. After some trouble I obtained another Chaise and went on. I thought myself lucky in getting off so cheap. I felt grateful to Heaven though some people think a special Providence is the creation of a vain spirit. I do not. I reached Medford rather later than usual, and spent the rest of the day much as usual.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0016

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-16

Monday 16th.

Morning cloudy. Returned to town rather late in order to give time for my Gig to be repaired. I found it ready at Charlestown. Misfortunes however never come single. As I was passing a truck my wheel came too near and turned me over on the pavement without any ceremony. I was not hurt and went on. But I have cause to thank heaven again that I was quit with the fright. My life might have paid the forfeit of my imprudence, though I really did not see what occasioned the shock. But the roads are very dangerous and I feel little or no desire to see more of them than I can help. I felt my bruises all day however and the thing affected me with low spirits. I did little or nothing in the { 357 } morning and in the afternoon, wrote a letter to my father. Evening at home reading the Disowned.1
1. A novel by Bulwer-Lytton, London, 1829.