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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


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Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0022

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-22

Friday 22nd.

Returned to town with Mr. Brooks and Abby. The weather was delightful and the softness of the air spread an agreeable influence over my feelings, which they needed very much. At the Office I was exceedingly disappointed at not finding any letters from home and began to think they had given me up. The morning was passed in a lazy way. Richardson called and sat an hour but I was exceeding dull. Afternoon reading Clarendon which interested me very much, particularly in the account of the civil war when it turned against the king. Took a walk. My system feels the effect of Spring here very much. But I had a better appetite this evening than for a week past. Went to see Miss Harriet Welsh who gave me some News regarding the arrangements of the family and that John and his wife were to come on.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0023

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-23

Saturday. 23rd.

Morning at the Office. Occupied in writing as usual and preparing my room for establishing myself. It looks very handsome but has cost me more than I had intended that it should. The weather was very warm indeed. I went to Medford with Mr. Brooks. Found P. Chardon Brooks and his wife there. I have not seen her before for a long time. She looks ill. The family are very much alarmed at the condition of Mrs. Brooks the elder, and justly so. Her health is now very alarmingly affected as I have too much feared it would be. Abby’s spirits are correspondingly affected, much to my regret. I hope much still. For the idea of the loss of her is too painful. She has always had to me the kindness of a Mother. I have never experienced any other feeling. Abby had a head ach and [was] unwell.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0024

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-24

Sunday. 24th.

The day was beautiful. One of those lovely ones which we have when the new approach of Summer throws every thing like vegetation out in the most brilliant colours. When the whole Country shows forth with vivid and brilliant green, and the air is soft and delightful to second the effect. I went to Meeting in the morning and heard a certain Mr. Gannet whom I did not like at all.1 Mrs. Everett and Miss Phillips at dinner. Mrs. Brooks very unwell. Abby also unwell until evening when she became better and was with me.
1. Presumably Thomas B. Gannett, a Congregational minister in Cambridge ( Mass. Register, 1829, p. 113).
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