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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0006

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-06

Saturday. 6th.

Morning at the Office. Engaged in writing as usual. I did not reform this morning, but passed it nearly all in reading the Memoirs of Grammont, very witty but very licentious. J. Eckley1 called upon me this morning and gave me notice that he had left the room above mine in this building and he paid me to the date for the rent. He seemed to think that George had thought of his fate some time and told me an anecdote of his [Eckley’s] insisting upon a receipt at the last Quarter which he had not done usually. It turned out luckily this time. But I do not think his idea has any foundation. That he [GWA] was in circumstances, where death or great trouble of mind were alternatives is however certain. This is a question which now can be explained by no human power, but my own impressions are derived from a careful perusal of his papers wherein nothing of the kind seems apparent. On the contrary, many references to the future. He was in the habit of committing the feeling of the moment so { 386 } much to paper, that I cannot help thinking this notion would now and then casually escape him.
I went to Medford with Mr. Brooks, to keep Abby Company as I thought she was alone, but I found Mrs. Brooks and the family had returned from their short excursion, not in the best condition. But I enjoyed myself very much.
1. Joseph Eckley, of 23 Court Street ( Boston Directory, 1828).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0007

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-07

Sunday. 7th.

The day which commenced with clouds and a little rain cleared off remarkably fine. I attended Divine Service all day and heard Dr. Richmond1 preach two Sermons of a very quiet, peaceable kind. He also dined with us. He is a clever man. Little of any remarkable kind happened. I was on the whole very happy. Although now my feelings are not altogether free from care, yet it is not sufficient to deprive me of any enjoyment, and my situation sometimes makes me feel melancholy from the idea that it is only a little too happy. That I am hardly deserving of so much and such long continued favour. My life has been hitherto for the most part an unclouded one. My troubles have been caused by myself and in reviewing the past, I cannot help being a little surprised to notice how many false notions, occasioned most generally by excessive prosperity, have led me astray, and have caused a penance often more severe in appearance than the original offence, but the lessons have not been useless as I hope. For they have been much reflected upon.
1. Abel Richmond, the Congregational minister at Halifax, in Plymouth county ( Mass. Register, 1827, p. 112).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0008

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-08

Monday 8th.

Returned to town with Mr. Brooks, weather showery but quite mild. Arrived at the Office, and found a letter from my father giving me some more definite information in regard to the future.1 I am therefore now inclined to think there is some probability that they may come on Saturday. My morning was wasted. I spent much time in writing my Index, this part of which I am anxious to conclude. Thos. O. Brackett called upon me on the subject of a Note due by my brother to him,2 to inquire if any arrangement had been made to meet it. I told him, I was in expectation that my father would soon be here when I would see about it. Also Josiah Quincy who came to make some inquiries, regarding some busts which have { 387 } arrived for my father, which I am unable to give any directions about. He informed me of the engagement of my cousin Elizabeth C. Adams to Mr. John M. Gourgas of Quincy,3 which at first I doubted, but hearing it afterwards confirmed, I was very glad of it. The match is respectable. After dinner, I finished the History of Clarendon, which has given me much pleasure. I like the style and the sentiment generally, though subject to exception. Evening, rain, at home.
1. JQA announced that he and LCA were leaving Washington on 8 June and expected to arrive in Quincy on 13 June. “On returning to Quincy,” he added, “I propose giving as much attention to my own Affairs, as I can; and they will require a great deal” (JQA to CFA, 3 June 1829, Adams Papers).
2. Thomas O. Brackett was a messenger at the Traders’ Bank ( Boston Directory, 1833). See entry for 23 July, below.
3. John M. Gourgas Jr. was a lawyer and a justice of the peace in Quincy (JQA, Diary, 18 June 1829; Mass. Register, 1832, p. 83). However, Elizabeth Coombs Adams never married.