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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0018

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-18

Saturday 18th.

Delayed very considerably by my father in order to copy certain letters which he wished me to dispatch. I then rode to town and passed the morning in looking over the accounts and Inventory of my brother’s effects to a final settlement. Mr. Joshua Coffin, a Client of mine1 called upon me to inform me that he could not pay me today, which is the universal cry. Boston is and has been in great distress, the pressure has been very great all round and it is difficult to collect debts for others or for one’s self.
At two, my father called and I drove his carriage to Medford to { 405 } dine there. The Brooks family and Mr. Stetson composed the Company. The dinner was therefore large—Chardon, his wife and Mrs. Everett being the only absentees. It was also pleasant, more so than any I have had for my recollection of [others?] was so little agreeable that I felt glad that during the last year I had been excepted. They were to me immense bores and ever since last winter when we silently came to an understanding about that, I have enjoyed myself infinitely more. But after dinner, I was suddenly seized with a violent pain apparently in the Kidney so far as I could judge from the effect it produced upon my urine. I felt alarmed for I have had some slight apprehensions of the gravel already. It made me sober for the remainder of the day. I felt in no humour to entertain a large panel of Company who came in the evening and so after only bowing to Miss Davis of New York and recognizing Mrs. Keating of Philadelphia, I left them to make the best of themselves, and even after they left, Abby complained heavily of my coldness.
1. Joshua Coffin lived in Williams Court ( Boston Directory, 1829–1830).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0019

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-19

Sunday 19th.

At home all day. Heavy rain fell in the morning. I did not attend divine service, principally because I was not asked and a little on account of natural indolence. I seized the opportunity of the day however to read the North American Review in the last Number, some of the Articles of which are good, especially one upon Elocution, which gratified me extremely.1 The tone and spirit of this article are better than those which we find in general in this publication which has been tamed down to the most stupid of milk and water. In the evening with Abby. Some Company came and among others, two Mr. Angiers,2 who sang a few simple songs tolerably well. They are apparently very well satisfied with their style and probably will remain so until they learn a better [one].
1. Orville Dewey’s “Principles of Elocution,” North American Review, 54:38–66 (July 1829).
2. John and Luther Angier (Brooks, Medford , p. 501).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0020

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-20

Monday 20th.

Morning to town with Mr. Brooks and Abby. The day was misty and damp, the wind being east, but it cleared off pleasantly before night. I was busy at the Office during the morning. Thomas B. Adams called in and passed some time with me. He has just arrived having been at New York long enough to alarm his family considerably.1 In { 406 } consideration of this, I thought I would take him to Quincy early. I succeeded however in getting through with and returning my Inventory of George’s effects to the Probate Court and the Appraisal so that I have that off my mind. The next thing will be to remove them from their present situation. I do not know how that will go. Rode out of town at four and reached Quincy shortly after five, just as my father was about taking a ride. I went with him to Mount Wollaston and had a pleasant conversation upon the beauty of the Country which did shine forth on this afternoon with great brilliancy. Family pride does strongly centre in him now. It has become an absorbing passion. Evening, Conversation—Economy.
1. JQA obtained a furlough for his nephew from his army station at Fort Pickens, South Carolina, and the young man spent much of the summer aiding JQA (Bemis, JQA , 2:186).