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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0022

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-22

Wednesday. 22nd.

Morning to town, weather exceedingly warm. I went into the Common Pleas for a few moments to look after my case which appears pretty safe. Then to Dr. Welsh’s as I had directed a man to come for Newspapers, in order to have them bound, which will make some number of Volumes. Having got rid of them, I went to Miss Oliver’s, { 407 } a tenant of mine to discuss the matter of repairs and a new Lease all which was done. They take a Lease for two years and I agree to paper and paint their rooms, with some other necessary repairs. On the whole, as Rents are falling, I think my bargain a good one. Returned to the Office, wrote a short Note to Abby in reply to one of her’s.1 She wants me to go to Medford tomorrow instead of today as she has her Medford friends, as I suppose a kind of valedictory. I must go, but on the whole I am very glad to get rid of this business so cheap. I have been here now nearly two years and have been exposed as a show at Medford very little. Afternoon, quiet at my room, for once read a little of the Spectator, and some Musical anecdotes, and resumed my Index not touched before since my father arrived. Evening to Quincy. A little fretful and something low spirited. Conversation with my father—Dr. Watkins’ case.
1. Both missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0023

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-23

Thursday 23rd.

Morning to town. Occupied during the morning in copying some Executors papers for my father, in making a settlement with T. O. Brackett upon George’s Note for One hundred dollars with interest from the third of March which I paid, then went to Hancock Street where I made my arrangements with Miss Oliver and concluded the lease. Ordered Hollis to make some small repair that was required on it and then went to Mr. Foster’s and ordered a paper for them in this way getting through the business. Mr. Curtis called upon me about the expedition to Weston and I fixed Tuesday for it. This consumed the morning and I then rode to Medford. Found Mr. and Mrs. Frothingham and Miss Mary B. Hall at dinner. Mrs. Brooks is sick, and gets no better. I am distressed for the consequence and Abby was evidently much depressed by it. Evening, a Medford party, a thing highly distressing to me, but I got through with it better than I expected. I forced myself through the form of introduction in many cases and so saved myself the trouble of being a post all the evening. But it was fatiguing and did not pay [for] itself.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0024

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-24

Friday 24th.

Returned to town this morning, and passed it as I usually do in the performance of a multiplicity of little things no one of which was of great consequence yet all needing attention. It is quite surprising to perceive how many little duties accumulate upon one without his being sensible of it. In like manner in the afternoon, I was writing to { 408 } all the different individuals connected with my various duties as Agent and Administrator, dunning letters, for money. One agreeable thing however occurred, Mr. Coffin paid me a fee which is the first professional money I have touched since May, though I have done some business since. My head was a little out of order, and I felt nervous. Saw Mr. Kinsman and consulted him about a Note from a man by the name of Williams to my late brother. I have not yet made up my mind whether to prosecute. Rode out of town with Abby Adams. She has passed a few days in Boston and returns with a Cold. Evening at Quincy. Col. Josiah Quincy and his brother in Law Greene1 paid a visit. The latter rather silly. Conversation prosy, and I was so sleepy as to be glad to go to bed.
1. Benjamin Daniel Greene, Harvard 1812, married Margaret Morton Quincy (Edmund Quincy, Josiah Quincy , p. 450). See Adams Genealogy.