A website from the Massachusetts Historical Society; founded 1791.
close

Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0028

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-28

Tuesday 28th.

Arose early this morning in order to start with my father for Weston. He having fixed this day to go and see the farm which is there in his possession, and the gift of Mr. Boylston. We called at Mr. Curtis’ for him and arrived at Weston before eleven, it being twenty miles at least. The farm appears in tolerable condition since the tenants undertook it, and though it is pretty much a dead weight upon his hands, all he would wish would be that it did not run him in debt. After going over it and seeing the ordinary condition in which it is, we returned so as to reach Quincy by half past three o’clock. The day was favourable to our horses, it being cloudy and with appearance of rain. Passed an hour in the garden looking at the peach trees, the appearance of { 410 } which is really disheartening. And my father although a fine theorist has not the least practical and useful knowledge in the world. My time is so taken up as to make me unable to attend to it. So the garden is likely to go to ruin. Attempted a little of Bishop Burnet without success. William E. Foster brought his sister out here, Elizabeth,1 who remains on a visit to Louisa C. Smith. Mr. Coggins, a man from West Chester, Pa. called to see the House and my Father. Curiosity, but he seemed unassuming so it pleased me to indulge him. Evening, fatigued and went to bed very early.
1. They were children of James H. Foster (JQA to LCA, 31 July 1829, Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0029

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-29

Wednesday 29th.

Morning to town, threatening a warm day but without being so. My time was taken up in looking over the papers of my brother and in destroying all those which are of little or no use. He managed to collect and preserve every thing relating to himself from his earliest years and the mass now shows his industry ill regulated as it was. He was a very extraordinary young man, had he possessed but a single quality which I can without much vanity lay claim to, he would have been excelled in life by few. My particular forte in me is of but little use, for I have not his accomplishments to push forward with it.
Having been invited to day to dine with Mr. Everett I went out and found there Mr. Brooks and Abby, Col. Barnard of Rochester1 and Mr. Sparks. The dinner was tolerably pleasant, and Mr. Everett quite easy and agreeable. I should like very well to become a little more acquainted with him. After remaining there until after seven, I drove with Abby to Medford. The Evening passed as usual. Little or nothing remarkable.
1. Daniel Dewey Barnard (1796–1861), a Rochester, N.Y., lawyer who had just served one term in Congress and had been defeated for reelection ( DAB ).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0030

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-30

Thursday. 30th.

Returned to town bringing Abby with me as far as Charlestown. The weather which looked threatening in the morning became more so until we were deluged with torrents of rain. I employed the morning in drawing up my accounts for the month and also in making some disposition of a few loose things which trouble me. I am continually finding such. I got rid of a dunning Note to Mr. Alden Bradford,1 and dispatched a letter to John, enclosing a Note of one Williams who has gone to Baltimore and may be caught there. In { 411 } the afternoon, I went to Hancock Street to see Miss Oliver who sent for me without any definite reason but to beg more repairs, rather unreasonably as I thought, so I left her immediately. Then to Dr. Welsh’s where I was engaged all the rest of the afternoon in making a disposition of George’s books. Then to Quincy. It rained again during the evening. My father seemed dull and out of spirits. He complained of headach, and seemed more discouraged than I have yet seen him.
1. Alden Bradford (1765–1843), Harvard 1786, an historical writer and editor and from 1812 to 1824 Secretary of the Commonwealth, lived at this time on Summer Street ( DAB ; Boston Directory, 1829–1830). For the consequences of CFA’s letter, see entry for 5 Aug., below.