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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


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Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0014

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-14

Friday 14th.

Morning to town. Mr. Frothingham came in with me and we had much conversation upon many subjects, in most of which I found our notions agree considerably. Discussing the character of Mr. Everett, I saw clearly that we both understood his character. But I felt unwilling to go very much into the expression of my opinions. Mr. Everett has been friendly to me, and it is very silly for me to hazard his kindness and turn it into enmity of a most disagreeable description. At the Office. Nothing remarkable. Dismissed my new Office boy in disgust. Up at the house where I wasted an hour pleasantly with Abby, but did nothing. Called to see my Carpenter but could not find him. My bookcase lags. Then to the Office and out of town. Pleasant dinner at home and discussion about Wine in which I found I knew very little about it. Walk into the town to see about certain bottles, but I could not obtain any. My father promises me some fine Madeira if I set about it. Dropped in to see my Uncle Thomas and his family. Spent half an hour there in conversation about immaterial things, obtained a Volume of my set of Voltaire which has been there since last year and returned home to tea. So fatigued this evening that I could not sit up beyond nine o’clock, being another case of overfatigue. My father was interesting too, upon the English Novelists.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0015

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-15

Saturday. 15th.

We were visited early this morning with the most severe thunderstorm that I have heard or seen for many years. It was longer and heavier than usual, remaining over us for more than two hours and with incessant flashes of lightning. One house was struck in the town and a fire was visible in the distance. The bell of the Meeting house began to ring and the fury of the storm, the quietness of the Country visible in the strong glare of the light when it poured from the Clouds, with the melancholy but alarming tone of the bell, presented a scene equal to the strongest imagination. I was sleepless for three hours and arose still tired and exhausted. To Boston. Morning at the Office, excepting when I was engaged in a number of commissions given me for the morning, purchasing Carpets and other things for the House at Quincy. Mr. Curtis called upon me, and gave me a deed to draw for the Estate of Mr. Boylston at the same time retaining me as Conveyancer in general which is a good place. Dined in town. Afternoon rather wasted. Why I do not know, but I feel now too much disarranged to do much. To Medford. Found Abby and the family well. { 419 } Pleasant Evening. Abby was affectionate and I enjoyed myself altogether very much.