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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0025

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-25

Tuesday. 25th.

Morning to town in the Carriage as I wished to have it repaired and have one of the horses attended to, his feet being in bad condition. This made me very late. I found that Abby was in town this morning and therefore went up directly to the House to see her, where I remained until she left town with her father. I had much conversation with her upon the present state of our affairs and also upon the arrangements for our marriage. It is now coming on rapidly and I feel at this moment a little qualmish about it. May God protect me for I am now so in the Web of my own weaving that my own indiscretions will bring misery upon more than myself. I will however hope for better things. There is hope and it is my stay. I love Abby too much to be altogether without apprehension.
Returned to the Office and after dinner, wrote my Journal for a number of days past, then Called to see Blake who is to be my first Groomsman, and made arrangements with him, as to what it would be necessary for him to do. Not much as I hope, for I do not now feel any { 426 } desire to make display. Our family is now situated very differently from what it has been, and my spirits if they were supported before, have seen enough now since my Journey to New York, to show how little in accordance gaiety is with our feelings and situation. I then drew up my father’s accounts. Thus passed the day. No letters in the evening from my Mother or John so I returned to Quincy late.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0026

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-26

Wednesday. 25th [i.e. 26].

Morning to town but rather late owing to some conversation with my father which detained me. He is now pursuing the study of the History of this Country very assiduously, and he asks me to assist him in the mechanical part of preparing the manuscripts. I am perfectly willing to do so, but cannot help thinking that my time is of more value to me than the product which this will bring.
Occupied in town, first in writing my Journal, next in copying for my father sundry letters and papers connected with his own affairs and those of the Executors of Mr. Boylston. I felt so unwell that I thought I would take no dinner but simply subsist upon six oysters as a luncheon. My bowels not being perfectly in order. In the afternoon I went to the House and superintended the moving of my own books from the Office, which are more in number than I had expected and which will not at any rate I am fearful, go into the space I have devoted for them. But I was so exceedingly unwell during the whole afternoon that I could do nothing more than just to lay them in confusion upon the floor, and trust to a better opportunity. Besides my Carpenter has been exceedingly slow about the matter and has not yet made the last Bookcase, which provokes me exceedingly. I returned to the Office and from thence rode to Quincy after finding that there were again no letters from any of the family. I felt so unwell all day that I began to be apprehensive of a fit of sickness so I kept fast.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0027

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-27

Thursday. 27th.

Morning to town, Conversation with my father upon his property. Many very heavy calls upon it just at present. Then upon my Marriage. He made me a present this morning of three portraits. One of my Grandfather painted by Stuart and exceedingly valuable, and those of my father and Mother by the same artist but not so good.1 I was surprised and pleased. They are now in the possession of Mr. Cruft and I must attend to their being shortly transferred.
Then I rode to town. At the Office. Found there Mr. Conant from { 427 } the farm at Weston, who came to tell me that he was apprehensive he should be unable to keep it on his lease.2 I regretted this very much and conversed with him much. He appeared discouraged and said the farm would be likely to run him in debt. It was always a matter of apprehension to me that I should find it so with my father. But I tried to encourage him by telling him that he now saw the worst side and that it would improve. He left me doubtful as to what he intended to do. I feel as if this was going to be a trouble to us.
Then came Mr. Farmer, who went over a long and disgusting detail of old affairs in attempting to clear himself which I did not believe he could do. What the purpose of it was I cannot say but having found that I was not likely to give way to extortion, he changed his ground and tried apology. I told him I wished to be rid of the business as soon as possible. My poor brother had involved himself beyond redemption among a parcel of very indifferent characters. Thus my morning was wholly taken up, and after seeing Mr. Degrand upon some investment my father wished to make, I went to see Mr. Brooks, and decided upon going out to see Abby at any rate to day. I therefore went before dinner with him. Found Abby as usual and passed a very pleasant afternoon and evening with her as usual. Conversation about the future and our prospects.
1. Gilbert Stuart’s celebrated portrait of JA in old age, 1823 (now owned by C. F. Adams of Dover, Mass.), and his matching portraits of JQA and LCA painted in 1818 (now owned by Mrs. Arthur Adams of Charles River Village, Mass.).
2. Amory and Silas Conant leased the farm at Weston for $125 a year (JQA, Diary, 28 July 1829; CFA, Accounts as Manager of John Quincy Adams’ Finances, 1828–1846, p. 31, M/CFA/3, Adams Papers, Microfilms, Reel No. 297).