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Browsing: Diary of John Quincy Adams, Volume 1


Docno: ADMS-03-01-02-0007-0009-0015

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1785-07-23

23d.

After breakfast I went to see Coll. Monroe, and Mr. Hardy, of the Virginia delegation. Call'd upon Mr. Fontfreyde. Lounged about untill near two o'clock, and then return'd again to N (189) where the gentlemen of the Virginia delegation lodge. Mr. Gerry, Mr. King, Mr. Monroe, Mr. Hardy, Mr. Smith,1 and myself, went all in the president's Carriage, to General Knox,2 who lives about 2 miles out of town. There was a considerable company at dinner. Miss R. Sears, was remarkable among the Ladies, and was exceedingly pretty. She has lately been ill, and is a little pale, but had she sufficient colour, she would I think be a compleat beauty.
Mr. Hardy, advised me to spend sometime in Virginia, with Mr. Wythe,3 who has form'd a sort of a law academy, which, he as well as Mr. Jefferson, and the president think a most usefull institution. Mr. Hardy wishes that there may be much intercourse between the different States, in order to increase, our Union. And for that purpose he thinks that it would be very useful for the youths of one State, to be educated in another.
Went in the Evening to the Coffee house and at about 9 o'clock returned home.
{ 294 }
1. Probably Melancthon Smith, New York delegate, 1785–1788 ( Biog. Dir. Cong. ).
2. Henry Knox had been appointed by the congress in March secretary at war, in which position he continued to serve until the formation of the government under the federal constitution ( DAB ).
3. George Wythe, judge of Virginia's chancery court, was appointed in 1779, while Jefferson was governor, to the first chair of law in America, at William and Mary College (same).

Docno: ADMS-03-01-02-0007-0009-0016

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1785-07-24

24th.

Went in the forenoon to St. Paul's church and heard Mr. Doughty preach a sermon upon a text in Corinthians, concerning the knowledge of ourselves. He spoke to the general satisfaction of the Congregation. I afterwards went with the Captain on board our packet, and dined there. Saw Mr. B. Jarvis1 who invited me to go over next Sunday to Long Island. We went and engaged a Phaèton at Brooklyn, a small town on the island, opposite to N. York. Return'd to the City, and drank tea with Mr. Smith. Walk'd with Mr. Jarvis, on the batteries, till about 9 o'clock.
1. Benjamin Jarvis was the brother of Charles Jarvis and Mary (“Polly” ) Jarvis Bowden, mentioned in later entries (entries for 31 July, 16 Aug., below).

Docno: ADMS-03-01-02-0007-0009-0017

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1785-07-25

25th.

Waited upon Major L'Enfant in the morning; gave him a Letter for le Chevalier d'Antroches. The President dined at the french Consul's on Long Island. I went in the afternoon to see Mr. Salvius, and found the officers of the packet with him. Called upon Mr. Jay who was not at home.

Docno: ADMS-03-01-02-0007-0009-0018

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1785-07-26

26th.

I stroll'd about the town almost all the forenoon; dined with Coll. Monroe, and Mr. Hardy, from Virginia. Mr. A. Lee left town in the afternoon. I walk'd with Mr. Gerry and Mr. King till 7 o'clock, when I went and called on Mr. Mölich who returned last evening from his trip into the Country. Sat with him till about 9.

Docno: ADMS-03-01-02-0007-0009-0019

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1785-07-27

27th.

Breakfasted with Mr. Gerry in Company, with Mr. Söderström the Sweedish Consul at Boston who arrived here lately. Went with Mr. Mölich and visited Mr. van Berkel, and { 295 } Mr. Le Roi; Dined at Mr. Ramsay's in Company with Mr. Gardoqui, Mr. Randon, General Howe, General Knox, Miss Susan Livingston for whom I had a Letter, and several other persons. Miss L. appears to me to be a great talker, but says very little. Somewhat superficial, if I am not mistaken; which must always be pardoned in a Lady. Miss Marshall, is much more pleasing to me. Perhaps I judge wrong. Major L'Enfant is a true frenchman. I don't know what to make of Don Francisco.
It was between five and six o'clock, when we sat down to dinner, and it was near nine, before I came away.