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Browsing: Diary of John Quincy Adams, Volume 1


Docno: ADMS-03-01-02-0007-0010-0004

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1785-08-04

4th.

The british Packet sailed at about 10, in the morning. The weather was rainy, so I did not go out till almost noon. I then went with Mr. Harrison, and was by him introduced to Mrs. Swift and Miss Riché, from Philadelphia. Dined at Mr. Osgood in a pretty large Company. Young Mr. van Berkel said his Sister had arrived, somewhat sooner than he expected she would. The minister is gone to Philadelphia, to meet her, and she is expected here to-morrow or the next day. I made a very foolish mistake at dinner. At about 6 ½ in the evening, I went to drink tea with Mrs. Sears. There was a numerous Company. Miss Riché sung and Miss Eccles play'd on the harpsicord: the first sings with much grace, though she has not a clear nor a strong voice; and what I admire her for, is that she sings without requiring to be { 298 } urged as some Ladies do: for I prefer hearing a person sing ill if it is requested, than to hear a good song extorted from any one. “One fond kiss before we part” is a favourite song with Miss R. and she sung one of her own Composition, the words of which appeared very pretty. Miss Eccles, plays the best on the harpsichord, of any Lady in Town: I don't know of ever having heard any person who consider'd music only as a diversion, perform better. She has certainly acquired great perfection in the art.

Docno: ADMS-03-01-02-0007-0010-0005

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1785-08-05

5th.

I went and spent some time with Mr. Fontfreyde, in the forenoon. Dined with a large Company at the President's. It was his musical day, for once a week, he has Company, some of whom sing after dinner. Mr. Young, Mr. Livingston, Mr. Sayre,1 Mr. Read2 and General Howe, all sung. The first is the best singer, but I was wishing to be gone, for a long time after dinner. It was however between 7 and 8 o'clock before we could get away. We then went, and drank tea, with Miss Eccles, who again play'd admirably well upon the harpsichord. Miss Riché sung again the two songs, she favoured us with last evening: she sung so prettily that when I return'd home, instead of continuing my Satirical lines,3 I immediately began upon the most insipid stile of panegyric: but a few days will cure me.
1. Possibly Stephen Sayre, a New York merchant and banker, who was a diplomatic agent in Europe during the Revolution ( DAB ).
2. Possibly Jacob Read, a delegate to the congress from South Carolina, 1783–1786 ( Biog. Dir. Cong. ).
3. Not found.

Docno: ADMS-03-01-02-0007-0010-0006

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1785-08-06

6th.

Visited young Mr. Chaumont in the morning, who arrived a few days since from Philadelphia. I went with him to introduce him to the delegates from Massachusetts but they were gone upon Long Island, and are not expected back untill Monday. Dined at the president's in Company with Coll. Cropper from Virginia. In the afternoon Mr. Harrison went to accompany the Ladies, an employment of which he and they are very fond. I went and spent part of the evening with the officers of the packet; went on board and supped with them; after supper Mr. Le Bel and Mr. Le Breton came as far as shore with us.
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