A website from the Massachusetts Historical Society; founded 1791.
close
-
The Adams Papers Digital Edition is undergoing active maintenance while we work on improvements to the system. You may experience slow performance or the inability to access content. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. We will endeavor to return to full capabilities as soon as possible.

Browsing: Diary of John Quincy Adams, Volume 1


{ 397 }

Docno: ADMS-03-01-02-0008-0002-0001

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1786-02-01

Wednesday February 1st. 1786.

Slept none last Night. Felt unwell all day. Went in the evening to Mr. White's but nobody was there: from thence to Mr. Duncan's where I found Mr. Thaxter, and the young Squire, about as opposite to each other as North and South. Mr. Duncan, talk'd a great deal about paper money times, and the amazing depreciation, of that Currency. Went from thence in to Mr. Osgood's, where there was all Mr. White's family. Says Mr. W. we have not seen you, before, this month. I said I had been at his house last week. But that was not this month. This was wit. Spent an hour with Mr. Thaxter at his office. Studied none in the Night.

Docno: ADMS-03-01-02-0008-0002-0002

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1786-02-02

2d.

Lecture day. Mr. Adams, Mr. Allen, and Master Parker,1 dined here. I did not go. In the afternoon Eliza, finally came, and intends to stay here, as long as she remains in Haverhill; I imagine we shall both leave town about the same time. Mr. Thaxter came and spent an hour here in the Evening, which he seldom does, as he is a little too closely engaged in other business. He often reminds me of the lines in the Conquest of Canäan quoted, in page 240, of this volume.2 They are I think very applicable to him.
1. Presumably Daniel Parker, the Haverhill schoolmaster.
2. See entry for 28 Dec. 1785 (above).

Docno: ADMS-03-01-02-0008-0002-0003

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1786-02-03

3d.

Drank tea at old Mrs. Marsh's. Mr. and Mrs. Shaw have, a very high opinion of this Person; and I believe a just one. She appears to me, to be ting'd with Superstition, but of such as can do no harm in the world, and may be greatly conducive to her own happiness. Was about an hour at Mr. White's, and afterwards at Mr. Duncan's; a numerous Company there. Mr. Moores, and Ab: Duncan came and spent the remainder of the Evening here. Felt low spirited but tickled my spleen, by reading Young's 6th. Satire in the love of Fame.1
1. “On Women” (Edward Young, Love of Fame, The Universal Passion, In Seven Characteristic Satires, London, 1728).
{ 398 }