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Browsing: Diary of John Quincy Adams, Volume 2


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Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0001-0009-0022

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1786-10-22

22d.

Mr. Tread well, preach'd in the forenoon from Matthew XI. 15 “he that hath ears to hear, let him hear;” and in the afternoon from Psalm IV. 4. commune with your own heart. Mr. T. appears to be a sensible man; but by no means a good speaker. In common conversation his voice, and manner of speaking is agreeable; but if he begins to pray or to preach, he immediately assumes a most disgusting cant. He spent the evening here; and talk'd of his Son, who is at college, in the junior class. He appears to have juster ideas of him, than parents commonly have of their children.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0001-0009-0023

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1786-10-23

23d.

Mr. Cranch went this morning to Boston. His Son, went with him, and will proceed to Haverhill, for his Sister Lucy. Leonard and Peggy White, return'd to Boston. Thayer one of Charles's classmates, dined here, and after dinner they both set off to go to Scituate. Thus from a numerous company, we are all at once reduced to a very small party; I went down in the afternoon to the library. Miss Betsey Apthorp spent the evening here.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0001-0009-0024

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1786-10-24

24th.

Went down to my uncle Adams's in the afternoon, and spent a couple of hours. Finished reading Burlamaqui, upon natural and political Law. I am much pleased with the principles established by this author. The stile of the english translator is not agreeable.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0001-0009-0025

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1786-10-25

25th.

Thayer and Charles returned from Scituate this afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Hilliard came to pass the night here. Mr. H appears much more to advantage in private conversation than he does in the pulpit. He appears to be a very sensible man.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0001-0009-0026

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1786-10-26

26th.

We have been left alone again this day. Mr. and Mrs. Hilliard went away this morning. I employ most of my time at present in reading the Abbé Millot's elements of history.1 They are well written but very concise. He is quite philosophical: in some pas• { 119 } sages perhaps too much so. At least he calls in question many historical facts; without sufficient reason, I think. His reflections which seem to form the greatest part of his work, are for the most part just, and display, much humanity, which is an essential requisite in a historian.
1. Claude François Xavier Millot, Elemens d'histoire générale..., 9 vols., Switzerland, 1778. JQA 's copy, at MQA, was purchased in 1781.