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Browsing: Diary of John Quincy Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0002-0008-0014

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1787-08-13

13th.

I intended to have gone this day to Newbury-Port, but the weather was so excessively warm, that I determined this morn• { 275 } ing to omit going, till to-morrow. I paid a visit to Judge Sargeant in the forenoon and spent a couple of hours there. Conversed upon political subjects. Saw Mr. Thaxter a few minutes. After dinner I went with Mr. and Mrs. Shaw, to see my classmate Eaton, but he was not at home. On our return we stop'd at Parson Adam's, but neither was he to be found so that we then came home, and I passed the evening with my uncle.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0002-0008-0015

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1787-08-14

14th.

It was so warm again this day, that I did not set out from Haverhill, till between 3 and 4 in the afternoon. On the road I met at different times Mr. Tappan, Stedman and Thompson, and Tom Hooper. I arrived at Mr. Tufts's in Newbury-Port, just before sun-set. I did not enter the town with the most favorable impressions: about three weeks hence I am to become an inhabitant of the place; without friends or connections, I am to stand on my own ground, and am in all probability To live here three years; whether agreeably or, not time only must discover; but the presages within my breast are not such as I should wish realized.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0002-0008-0016

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1787-08-15

15th.

In the forenoon I went to see Mr. Parsons, and inform'd him that I should probably attend at his office in about three weeks: Stedman and Thomson are there now, but the former of these will leave the office, by the latter end of next month. My classmate Putnam has applied for admission, and intends, I am told to enter the office in November. Two at once would be full sufficient, but if there are half a dozen it cannot be helped. I went accompanied by Stedman, and paid a visit to Miss Jones, the young lady who was at Mr. Wiggles worth's when Bridge, and I boarded there, last winter. She looks very unwell, and they fear she is in a consumption.
Dined at Mr. Tufts's, and soon after dinner I went to see my friend and Classmate Little. I found Thomson there, but he soon after proceeded on his way to Wenham. We had several smart showers in the course of the afternoon. Just before dark I returned to Mr. Tufts's at the port. In the evening, between 9 and 10, we had a very heavy shower, with a violent gust of wind.
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