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Browsing: Diary of John Quincy Adams, Volume 2


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Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0002-0010-0016

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1787-10-16

16th.

We rose at about nine o'clock. Dr. Kilham, was just going to take his seat in the Stage for Boston. The Dr. represents this town in the genl. Court; and goes to Boston now, to attend at the Session, which opens to-morrow. I was at the office in the forenoon, but could not attend much to any study. I took a walk with Townsend. Return'd again to the office, and just as I had got ready to sit down to business, in came W. Cranch and Leonard White from Haverhill: who insisted upon it that I should go there with them this afternoon; and in such a positive manner that I could not deny them. They dined with me at my lodgings, and at about four in the afternoon, we all mounted our horses for Haverhill. The wind was very high, and scattered the dust so much that the riding was very disagreeable. We drank tea at Russell's, and were almost half an hour crossing the river, though the wind had considerably abated. At about seven we got to Mr. Shaw's house. Miss N. Quincy, and Miss B. Cranch came in from Mr. Duncan's soon after. Mr. James Duncan, invited, W. Cranch and me to dine with him to-morrow. The troop of horse, of which he is 1st. lieutenant are to parade in the morning, and he makes an entertainment for them.
It was past 11 this evening when we retired.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0002-0010-0017

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1787-10-17

17th.

This day a regiment of foot, and a troop of about 60 horse-men paraded, and were review'd by Genl. Titcomb. The weather was rather disagreeable, though not so windy as it was yesterday. One of the foot companies was drest in the rifle uniform. That of the horse was red faced with green: the horses in general were good, but the company has not been formed long, and are not yet perfect in their exercices. We dined at Mr. Duncans. I chatted with Mr. Symmes upon the new Constitution. We did not agree upon the subject. While we were talking Mr. Bartlett came in, and was beginning to attack me. I told him I wish'd to change the subject; as I felt utterly unequal to the task of opposing two persons of whose judgment I had so high an opinion, as Mr. Symmes and Mr. Bartlett. Bartlett laugh'd and said I was very polite. “Adams,” says Symmes, “you shall go home with me, and take a bed to-night.” And I found that France is not the only Country where Yorick's secret 1 has its influence. We walk'd up the hill { 305 } where the regiment was parading in the afternoon; but the weather was so cold that I return'd back some-time before they finish'd. The general was drest and mounted rather shabbily: he has never been employd in military life; and nobody knows how he came to be a major general.
Pass'd part of the evening at Mr. White's.
Found Mr. Allen, and Mr. Tucker at Mr. Shaw's: they staid till about 9 o'clock; and then return'd to Bradford.
1. That is, flattery (Laurence Sterne, A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy, in Works, 10 vols., London, 1788, 5:210).