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Browsing: Diary of John Quincy Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0002-0010-0017

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1787-10-17

17th.

This day a regiment of foot, and a troop of about 60 horse-men paraded, and were review'd by Genl. Titcomb. The weather was rather disagreeable, though not so windy as it was yesterday. One of the foot companies was drest in the rifle uniform. That of the horse was red faced with green: the horses in general were good, but the company has not been formed long, and are not yet perfect in their exercices. We dined at Mr. Duncans. I chatted with Mr. Symmes upon the new Constitution. We did not agree upon the subject. While we were talking Mr. Bartlett came in, and was beginning to attack me. I told him I wish'd to change the subject; as I felt utterly unequal to the task of opposing two persons of whose judgment I had so high an opinion, as Mr. Symmes and Mr. Bartlett. Bartlett laugh'd and said I was very polite. “Adams,” says Symmes, “you shall go home with me, and take a bed to-night.” And I found that France is not the only Country where Yorick's secret 1 has its influence. We walk'd up the hill { 305 } where the regiment was parading in the afternoon; but the weather was so cold that I return'd back some-time before they finish'd. The general was drest and mounted rather shabbily: he has never been employd in military life; and nobody knows how he came to be a major general.
Pass'd part of the evening at Mr. White's.
Found Mr. Allen, and Mr. Tucker at Mr. Shaw's: they staid till about 9 o'clock; and then return'd to Bradford.
1. That is, flattery (Laurence Sterne, A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy, in Works, 10 vols., London, 1788, 5:210).

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0002-0010-0018

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1787-10-18

18th.

We dined this day at Mr. Bartlett's. Captain Wier, was there, and Miss S. McKinstry, who is upon the point of being married to Major Starke, and Miss Barrell, a young Lady from Boston whose countenance indicates misfortune. She had a lover, who forsook her upon discovering that she had not a fortune as he had expected. Townsend came into Town yesterday with Miss P. Greenleaf; and return'd this afternoon to Newbury.
The young ladies drank tea at Judge Sargeant's. I spent the evening till between 8 and 9 o'clock at Mr. White's.
I had in the course of the day, and have had every day since I came here a great deal of conversation with Mr. Shaw concerning Sam Walker, who still persists in declaring himself innocent, though every one who is acquainted with the circumstances, must be as fully convinced of his guilt, as if he had seen him do the deed himself: Mr. Shaw was much afflicted. He had great expectations from Walker, who had been his pupil, and whose reputation would in some measure have reflected honour upon his instructor. But “how art thou fallen Lucifer, son of the morning”!1
1. A partial rendering of Isaiah, 14:12.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0002-0010-0019

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1787-10-19

19th.

W. Cranch, and the two young ladies set off this morning for Boston. The weather is much milder for them than it has been for several days past.
I spent the forenoon with Mr. Thaxter at his office. He is to be published1 next Sunday.
{ 306 }
Dined at Mr. Shaw's. Just after dinner Mrs. Allen came in from Bradford, and inform'd us of Deacon Smith's death.2 He died on Tuesday morning. The news came by Dr. Williams, who lodg'd at Bradford last night.
Between 3 and 4, I set out to return home, and overtook, F. Bradbury and Winslow in a chaise going the same way. At about half past five I got home; and went and pass'd the evening with Townsend. Amory is quite unwell. Return'd this day from Portsmouth.
1. That is, his marriage banns with Elizabeth Duncan, of Haverhill, were to be published.
2. Deacon Isaac Smith, of Boston, JQA 's great-uncle, who died on 16 Oct.