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Browsing: Diary of John Quincy Adams, Volume 2


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Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0003-0008-0006

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1788-08-06

6th.

Putnam went last week to Danvers, and return'd this forenoon. He brought me a Letter, which came from Townsend,1 enclosing one for Mrs. Hooper. Amory it seems has suddenly determined to open an office in Salem; and has already put his determination into execution. He had concluded to take a trip, either to Georgia, or Carolina; but upon being informed that Pickman had altered his scheme; he thought it would be best to try his fortune first in this part of the Country. I went in the evening with Thompson, up to Mrs. Atkins's. I told them that Townsend was coming here next week. Becca said she hoped he would make himself welcome by bringing Jo. Hooper with him: it was conjectured while Townsend lived in this Town, that he had a partiality for this lady. He frequented the house very much; and there appears now a coolness in them bordering upon the resentment of disappointment. Mrs. Atkins said that a man must generally be a good judge of his own compositions, and ask'd me if I was of that opinion; I was not and endeavoured to avoid answering directly; but she would not suffer it; and I was finally obliged to agree, to the truth of her observation; protestando to myself that it was only from complaisance to a Lady, that I agreed; which will always excuse a little self-denying as Hudibras calls it.
1. Letter not found.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0003-0008-0007

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1788-08-07

7th.

Thompson did not attend this day at the Office. Phillips called to see us this afternoon. He has been to Portsmouth, and is now upon his return to Boston: he expects to read law in Mr. Dawes's office. I walk'd into Newbury this evening with Stacey. The evenings grow long to my great regret. At present I can employ the evening from dusk till nine o'clock in walking; and as I am not over fond of visiting, this is the most agreeable, as well as to me the most useful method of spending my Time. I am not upon familiar terms in one house in Town; and upon the cold formality of ceremony, with which all my visits must be accompanied, I confess I wish not to be extensively acquainted.
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