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Browsing: Diary of John Quincy Adams, Volume 2


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Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0003-0008-0013

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1788-08-13

13th.

Mrs. Emery who has been very ill these four or five weeks, died last night, leaving to the wide world two orphan children, who three years ago had the fairest prospects of sharing a fortune of ten thousand pounds sterling; but who in consequence of Mr. Tracy's misfortunes, are now almost destitute of support.
I walk'd in the evening with Stacey and Little. Stacey left us. We met Putnam walking with some young Ladies. I joined them, and pass'd the remainder of the evening at Mr. Frazier's. These young Misses have assumed an importance rather above their years, and to the trifling conduct and conversation of childhood, unite the punctilious formality of riper years. I receive not much satisfaction in their company, and as they are handsome, I had rather look at them for five minutes than be with them five hours. Putnam is not so difficult to please. He can conform to their manners, and enter into all their debates: he is consequently a favourite.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0003-0008-0014

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1788-08-14

14th.

This was a day of humiliation and prayer at Mr. Carey's: on account of his sickness; and to implore the assistance of providence in choosing a colleague to supply his place. Mr. Webster of Salisbury preached in the forenoon; and performed very well. But Dr. Tucker in the afternoon was very interesting and pathetic; in showing how good and pleasant a thing it is for brethren to dwell together in unity. I attended Mrs. Emery's funeral. Mr. Andrews made the prayer; and performed even better than was expected. I passed part of the evening with Townsend; called at Mr. Tufts's, to see Mrs. Shaw; but she was gone out. Mr. Shaw called to see me in the morning. They came in town last night.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0003-0008-0015

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1788-08-15

15th.

I called in at Mr. Tufts's to see Mrs. Shaw this morning. I found old Mr. Carter there. Geneological as usual. I dined at his house, with my friends from Haverhill. He asked me to return to tea: I excused myself. He said that tippling business would be going on, every afternoon at six o'clock; if I would call there, I should be welcome. I returned to the Office but felt so much dis• { 443 } sipated, that I could not attend with much application. We met this evening at Stacey's lodgings. Townsend went away just before Sun-set. Lincoln1 a classmate of Thompson's, pass'd the evening with us. Though a young preacher, he is not so rigid in his principles as many others are. In the close of the evening we took a walk.
1. Rev. Henry Lincoln, minister at Falmouth, Mass. (History of the Town of Hingham, 4 vols, in 3, Hingham, 1893, 2:467).