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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 7


Search for a response to this letter.

Docno: ADMS-06-07-02-0130

Author: Schweighauser, John Daniel
Recipient: Franklin, Benjamin
Recipient: Lee, Arthur
Recipient: Adams, John
Date: 1778-11-07

J. D. Schweighauser and Others to the Commissioners

[salute] Honbl: Gentlemen

The repeated Captures of American Vessells, many of which notwithstanding the Convoys we have had off this Coast have been taken the day after their Separation, and the Knowledge obtained by Our Enemies of the time of Our Vessells sailing, which induces them to cruize at a greater distance to watch the Moment that the French Frigates part from their Convoy, incline us to wish for more effectual Protection.
In Addition to these Reasons we beg leave to represent, That many American Gentlemen, Several of whom are in the Publick Service and have already experienced the Horrors of an English Prison and others more Than Once taken on their Passages from hence to America and carried to England, propose to embark on board the present Outward bound Vessells: And as well on their Account as the Importance of the Supplies these Ships will carry to Our Country we trust your Endeavours will be joined to ours to obtain from the Minister of the Marine a sufficient Convoy for the whole Voyage.
With a View of giving you as little Trouble as possible we have written to Monseiur de Sartine,1 and We request you to use your Interest at Court to enforce our Petition.2
The Ships here and at Rochelle to the Number of Twelve or more will be ready in the Course of the present Month, by the End of which we hope the desired Convoy may be directed to arrive here.
We have the Honour to be with great Respect Honble. Gentlemen Your most Obedient & most humble Servants
[signed] J. D. Schweighauser Agent of the United States of America
[signed] Matthew Mease
[signed] Jno. Gilbank
[signed] William Haywood
[signed] John Lloyd
[signed] Nics. Martin
[signed] Ebenr. Atwood
[signed] Peter Collas
[signed] John Spencer
[signed] Jno. Grannis
[signed] Joseph Belton
[signed] Jos. Wm Spencer
[signed] Joseph Hill Jennings
[signed] Richd. Grubb
[signed] Alexr. Dick
{ 201 }
[signed] Phil Rd. Fendall
[signed] Danl. Blake
[signed] Clemt. Smith
[signed] Joshua Johnson
[signed] Matt: Ridley
[signed] Jona. Williams
[signed] Cha: Ogilvie
[signed] J. Grubb
[signed] Josiah Darrell
[signed] Cyprn. Sterry
[signed] Wilm Jenney
[signed] Christopher Bassett
[signed] Robert Ewart
[signed] Jno. Tyler
[signed] Daniel Kenney
[signed] Stephen Johnson
RC (PPAmP: Franklin Papers); docketed: “Letter, from Several Gentlemen at Nantes, for Convoy, ansd.”; in another hand: “Nov. 7. 1778.”
1. With the exception of William Haywood, all the subscribers below also signed the letter to Sartine of 7 Nov., and were joined by T. Blake, John Bondfield, Robert Elliot, John Ross, and Branford Smith (Arch. de la Marine, Paris, 82, vol. 413).
2. In their reply of 11 Nov., the Commissioners thanked the subscribers and promised to apply immediately to Sartine for a convoy ( LbC , Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-06-07-02-0131

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Williams, Jonathan
Date: 1778-11-08

To Jonathan Williams

[salute] Dear Sir

I have received your obliging Favour of the 27 of October,1 and am very much obliged to you for the Trouble you have taken, in sending me the Rum.
I have not yet received it, but as soon as it comes, I will send a Dozen to Dr. Bancroft and a Dozen to Mr. Alexander as you desire: But I must decline accepting the Remainder as a Present, for obvious Reasons, one among others is that there is no Justice in your putting yourself to the Expence of my Maintenance here, whatever occasion I may have for the Charity of my Friends at home. Please to draw upon me for the Expence of this Spirit, and your Bill shall be paid at sight. I am, with much Esteem, your humble servant
1. Not found, but see Williams to JA , 12 Nov. (below).

Docno: ADMS-06-07-02-0132

Author: Franklin, Benjamin
Author: Lee, Arthur
Author: Adams, John
Author: First Joint Commission at Paris
Recipient: Gilbank, John
Date: 1778-11-10

The Commissioners to John Gilbank

[salute] Sir

We have received your Letter of October the sixth, and wish it was in our Power to do more for officers in your situation than We do, altho that amounts in the whole to a large sum. But as We have al• { 202 } ready lent you as much Money as We have <lent> 1 been able to lend to other officers of your Rank and in your Circumstances, <it is not in our Power> 2 we cannot without a blameable Partiality <to> lend you any more. We, are, sir your most obedient humble servants3
1. The following four words were interlined by Benjamin Franklin.
2. The following two words were interlined by Benjamin Franklin.
3. On 12 Sept. the Commissioners had ordered that 360 livres be paid to Gilbank (vol. 6:360). Their refusal to provide additional funds was not unusual, for on 11 Nov. ( LbC , Adams Papers) they wrote an almost identical letter to Capt. William Hamilton and Lt. John Welch who, through payments approved on 30 Sept. and 10 Oct., had together received 1,032 livres (vol. 6:361).